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Wedding Video question...

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
when you're doing a wedding video, how much of the main parts of the reception should you show? If you're showing the first dance do you show the whole dance or just parts of it? same for other parts of the reception??
post #2 of 17
Ask your client.
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post #3 of 17
Agreed. You want to make something they want, but with a few extras to make them really happy they asked you.

It aso might depend on how much footage you have, how many cameras, and how long they want the final video to be. Photos can be worked in well, too. You could also make several short films and include them on one DVD. Make sure to add chapter markers and a list of them on the menu, so that people can quickly locate the scene they are trying to tell people about at dinner.

If you are using iMovie and want to snaz the movie up, use some of the plug-ins available from GeeThree.com. They even have one that allows you to mix four cams, so you can really do some cool stuff depending also on what time frmae you have for production.

Before doing any work on such a valuable project, back-up the video on an external hard drive and keep the original tapes in a safe place. The couple should get the originals when you are done.

If you put a little work into it, you can really make a nice project and make the couple happy. Good luck.

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

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Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply
post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally posted by Bergermeister
If you put a little work into it, you can really make a nice project and make the couple happy. Good luck. [/B]

To be honest, it sounds like he hasn't done this before. Should the newlyweds entrust him to video what will be one of the most important events in their lives?
post #5 of 17
Give him a break. For all we know he's doing it pro bono for a sibling's wedding or something. I suggested to ask the client because the song may have uber-special meaning to the couple and they'd want the whole moment captured. It may not be a big deal to them and, to conserve space on the DVD or keep a good "flow" going, abridging the first dance would be fine.
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post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally posted by ThinkingDifferent
To be honest, it sounds like he hasn't done this before. Should the newlyweds entrust him to video what will be one of the most important events in their lives?


You have to start somewhere I guess.

My wife and I are starting up a wedding video business at the moment. While I have had plenty of shooting, editing and graphics experience, we have never done a wedding so we are doing a close friend's for free (she was just going to get her uncle to do it on his Hi-8 piece of crap so what we do should be better than that!)

It really comes down to using your head/common sense and asking the couple a ba-zillion questions on what they want/expect.... then adding a few extras along with it to really wow them.

Then.... just shoot, shoot, shoot and then shoot some more so you have plenty of material at the end to create a timeless piece for the happy couple.

b.
"The world is all that is the case"
~ Ludwig Wittgenstein
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"The world is all that is the case"
~ Ludwig Wittgenstein
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post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 
Okay.
I made a wedding part, a reception part and a recap part.
the wedding part has all the important parts of the wedding but it's not so long that it's a bore to watch.
Then I took the important parts of the reception (Intros, first dance, father/daughter, mother/son, best man toast, bouquet, garter, cake cutting) plus the congrats by guests...and then some dancing...
The recap is about 3-4 minutes so that if they dont want to show the whole deal they can at least watch the recap and get it done quick...

Oh yeah, I have done this before and I just wanted to ask around to see how other people did it...and yes, the people liked the work I did for their weddings so I can be trusted...Hahahahahahaha...
post #8 of 17
The best part of my own wedding video was a slideshow of photos of the development of my wife's and my love together, with kind of a "Ken Burns" effect laid over the song we picked for the video, which was "We've Only Just Begun" by the Carpenters. It was the opening sequence of the video. Almost too easy to do nowadays, I expect it still has the desired effect (although I haven't watched the video since we split, of course).

From that the video went on to footage of the Chinese style wedding day.
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally posted by tonton
The best part of my own wedding video was a slideshow of photos of the development of my wife's and my love together,

Is this available on pay per view?
post #10 of 17
I take it you are committing the final cut to DVD (not tape) for the couple? It's worth noting that standard DVDRecordable media has a typical life span of two to fifteen years at very best. With this in mind it may be a good idea to run off a copy using a preservation disc like new Kodak - LINK HERE - just in case.

These discs have guaranteed data life integrity of 80-100 years.
May be a good investment for their children.
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally posted by MiMac
These discs have guaranteed data life integrity of 80-100 years.

Good luck finding a DVD player that still works in 80 years.
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post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally posted by MiMac
These discs have guaranteed data life integrity of 80-100 years.
May be a good investment for their children.

Does the guarantee take inflation into consideration?
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally posted by CosmoNut
Good luck finding a DVD player that still works in 80 years.

Or a video player for that matter.

There is something about books and their longevity that many of us geeks forget from time to time.

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply
post #14 of 17
I have only done this for nieces and nephews, They already had pro's doing what they wanted. Therefore I made the movies the way that I liked it. For me this limits most dances from 2 - 3 minutes, depending on their ability. All of the vows and the rest is slideshows unless something fun happens with the cake. Don't forget to get the right music.

reg
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally posted by CosmoNut
Good luck finding a DVD player that still works in 80 years.

That is not the point (and might not be the case). If one is going to archive this important video then you have to choose some kind of currently available media do you not?

Tape would be foolish. There's more chance of getting video off the DVD in 80 years than a brittle tape. What would you suggest?
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally posted by MiMac
There's more chance of getting video off the DVD in 80 years than a brittle tape. What would you suggest?

Oh, DVDs are as good of an option as any nowadays. I have a core issue with wedding videos in the first place. For the money that people spend, as much work goes into it, and as little as people will actually want them I don't think wedding videos are worth it. I've been asked by MANY couples to do a video for their weddings and I refuse each time.

Photography -- especially candid stuff -- is most desirable in my book, and I'm a professional video producer! You can hang a picture on a wall, set it on a desk, put it in a scrapbook, and have it essentially forever without having to plug it in, convert to the newest format, etc.
Living life in glorious 4G HD (with a 2GB data cap).
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Living life in glorious 4G HD (with a 2GB data cap).
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post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally posted by CosmoNut
Oh, DVDs are as good of an option as any nowadays. I have a core issue with wedding videos in the first place. For the money that people spend, as much work goes into it, and as little as people will actually want them I don't think wedding videos are worth it. I've been asked by MANY couples to do a video for their weddings and I refuse each time.

Photography -- especially candid stuff -- is most desirable in my book, and I'm a professional video producer! You can hang a picture on a wall, set it on a desk, put it in a scrapbook, and have it essentially forever without having to plug it in, convert to the newest format, etc.

Granted, most people watch their wedding video a few times then store it away. It will only be their children who may have any interest in it after many years. And there lies the inherent problem of choosing what media/format type to store memories with. I'd agree that photographs are a great way to remember the day and have better longevity but to be able to view a moving picture is also special.

Ever evolving formats are always going to be a problem though i'm sure that when a 'better' format of video player comes along then the owner of such an important video will/should convert it to the newer media to protect their investment.
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