or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mac Hardware › Future Apple Hardware › Intel reveals plans for forthcoming notebook chips
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Intel reveals plans for forthcoming notebook chips

post #1 of 38
Thread Starter 
Intel Corp. has just released plans for its mobile computing platform through the second quarter of 2007, which will include a new notebook processor with an 800MHz front-side bus.

According to a report by the microchip hounds at DailyTech, the world's largest chipmaker will introduce its next-generation of its "Merom" notebook processor -- the successor to the Yonah chip found in Apple Computer's current line of Intel Macs -- in two waves or "refreshes."

The first is expected to appear in August as part of Intel's existing "Napa" Centrino platform. It will be based on the company's 65-nanometer process and run on a 667MHz front-side bus. Intel previously announced that it will market these chips under the "Core 2 Duo" brand.

A second refresh of the Core 2 Duo Merom chip will reportedly show up in the second quarter of 2007 as part of Santa Rosa Centrino, the successor to Intel's Napa Centrino platform. This chip is said to sport an 800MHz front-side bus and add a new socket design called "Socket P."

Merom will initially be made available in five different variants ranging from 1.66GHz dual-core to 2.33GHz dual-core. The low-end model will cost approximately $209 while the high-end 2.33GHz chip will initially fetch $637. A mid-range 2GHz model will come in just shy of $300.

The first wave of Merom chips are expected to begin making their way into Apple's high-end MacBook Pro notebooks this fall as part of a seasonal refresh just prior to the holiday shopping season.
post #2 of 38
Now this is what I've long been waiting for, a true 64-bit processor to go with the existing OS it was designed for.
post #3 of 38
"Intel partners have confirmed to us that the Merom processors will require a BIOS update for the notebook when upgrading from a Core Duo Yonah system."

So maybe iMac and Mac Mini owners won't be able to just drop them in after all?
post #4 of 38
What does this mean for the MacBook? When does everyone think the MacBook will have these new chips? (Core 2 Duo)

Knowing Apple they will artificially separate the MacBook Pro and MacBook, and make the MacBook wait half a year. Or perhaps not. Seems like they are updating quicker now, keeping in line with Intel. That would be awesome if they finally catch up with the rest of the industry and update more frequently, and keep up with Intel. New MacBooks in the Fall? Hmm to wait or not to wait...
"Overpopulation and climate change are serious shit." Gilsch
"I was really curious how they had managed such fine granularity of alienation." addabox
Reply
"Overpopulation and climate change are serious shit." Gilsch
"I was really curious how they had managed such fine granularity of alienation." addabox
Reply
post #5 of 38
I think only the MBP will have merom in the initial launch. After the next refresh I see low end merom chips coming down into the MB.

Basically Apple has to keep the same clock speed or consumers get confused. Apple marketing is likely loathe to explain why a 1.66Ghz Merom is faster than a 1.83 Yonah based book. Thus they'll wait until they can get a 2Ghz or better merom at the right price and use it.

I hope the Macs don't require an update. I'd love to upgrade my mini to merom when the price is right.

I'm not overly concerned about the FSB increase either. That'll of course help memory performance but what's exciting is moving for a 3 issue core to 4 issue and doubling the L2 cache. Sweeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeet.
He's a mod so he has a few extra vBulletin privileges. That doesn't mean he should stop posting or should start acting like Digital Jesus.
- SolipsismX
Reply
He's a mod so he has a few extra vBulletin privileges. That doesn't mean he should stop posting or should start acting like Digital Jesus.
- SolipsismX
Reply
post #6 of 38
Is the lack of mention of iMac chip updates a bad sign?
post #7 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by Tux Kapono
Now this is what I've long been waiting for, a true 64-bit processor to go with the existing OS it was designed for.

You must misunderstand the situation. MacOS X has been designed for 32 bit systems. 10.4 had some 64-bit stuff grafted on for UNIX processes, but no GUI app could be a 64-bit app. Perhaps you're talking about Leopard (10.5)?

In addition, there is no benefit to 64-bit for most uses in a laptop, which is what Merom is targeting, since no Mac laptop yet can hold more than 4GB of RAM. Although, unlike with the PowerPC, there is some performance benefits to the 64-bit extensions.
post #8 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by austere
Is the lack of mention of iMac chip updates a bad sign?

Probably not. Merom would be a natural for the next iMac. It's 64-bit (markitechture) and has a Thermal Design Power of 35 watts so cooling wouldn't be too difficult. I'm thinking Merom and the iMac will definitely hook up.
He's a mod so he has a few extra vBulletin privileges. That doesn't mean he should stop posting or should start acting like Digital Jesus.
- SolipsismX
Reply
He's a mod so he has a few extra vBulletin privileges. That doesn't mean he should stop posting or should start acting like Digital Jesus.
- SolipsismX
Reply
post #9 of 38
Why would the MacBooks get the Merom Chips? They are a Consumer notebook. The 32 bit chip is plenty considering they keep up with the current G5s even in FInal Cut pro. This seems like "the grass is always greener" infused with a little "what have you done for me lately" mac user complex. There is no "artificial" line between the MacBook and the Pro. It is and looks like there will and should be a big distinction between the two since they are made for different users, not just for different wallets. I would love to get everything you get in a Pro in the cost and package of a MacBook, but then why have a Pro line? I would love to have a Quad in the price and the package of a mini, but then why have a Powermac line? There needs to be a distinction because they are made for two different markets. They should Keep the Yonahs for the Consumer line and the Merom/Woodcrest for the pro not for some artificial profit margin, but to keep the consumer products more affordable and so the product lines don't cannibalize each other. If you want more power pay for it. We don't want what happened to the powerbooks when the iBooks had virtually the same chip then powerbooks were considered slow and a waste of money.
It's only after you've lost everything that you're free to do anything.

Tyler Durden | Fight Club
Reply
It's only after you've lost everything that you're free to do anything.

Tyler Durden | Fight Club
Reply
post #10 of 38
Yonah really is going to top out at 2.4Ghz or so and that'll come by next year so the majority of laptops will eventually migrate over to Merom. Eventually you'll see pricing parity between the two and it'll make sense to use Merom for all but the lowest end laptops.

In the meantime Merom will indeed provide that differentiation between consumer and pro for 6-9 months in the Apple arena.
He's a mod so he has a few extra vBulletin privileges. That doesn't mean he should stop posting or should start acting like Digital Jesus.
- SolipsismX
Reply
He's a mod so he has a few extra vBulletin privileges. That doesn't mean he should stop posting or should start acting like Digital Jesus.
- SolipsismX
Reply
post #11 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by hmurchison
Probably not. Merom would be a natural for the next iMac. It's 64-bit (markitechture) and has a Thermal Design Power of 35 watts so cooling wouldn't be too difficult. I'm thinking Merom and the iMac will definitely hook up.

Those are pretty convincing reasons it's coming, but I guess the worry, as always, is when.

When Apple introduces a new chip generation in one product line do they generally update a few others at the same time or within a month thereafter?
post #12 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by hmurchison
Yonah really is going to top out at 2.4Ghz or so and that'll come by next year so the majority of laptops will eventually migrate over to Merom. Eventually you'll see pricing parity between the two and it'll make sense to use Merom for all but the lowest end laptops.

In the meantime Merom will indeed provide that differentiation between consumer and pro for 6-9 months in the Apple arena.


Very well stated.



"Think Alike... BE Different!"
never say never!
Reply
never say never!
Reply
post #13 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by NVRsayNVR
Very well stated.



"Think Alike... BE Different!"

Hey! Gig Harbor in the house! I love that area man. Boy it's gotten spendy though
He's a mod so he has a few extra vBulletin privileges. That doesn't mean he should stop posting or should start acting like Digital Jesus.
- SolipsismX
Reply
He's a mod so he has a few extra vBulletin privileges. That doesn't mean he should stop posting or should start acting like Digital Jesus.
- SolipsismX
Reply
post #14 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by hmurchison
Basically Apple has to keep the same clock speed or consumers get confused. Apple marketing is likely loathe to explain why a 1.66Ghz Merom is faster than a 1.83 Yonah based book.

Soooo..........

Skip the "why" and offer up a rough multiplier: Given the same clock (say 2.0 Ghz), how much faster is Merom than Yonah?

Followup: how application/task specific is this speed increase?

To my mind, if the speed difference between equally clocked Yonah & Merom machines is fairly easily noticed by an experienced user in an Apple Store playing around for a while, the problem will take care of itself to a certain degree.

gc
post #15 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by GordonComstock
Soooo..........

Skip the "why" and offer up a rough multiplier: Given the same clock (say 2.0 Ghz), how much faster is Merom than Yonah?

Followup: how application/task specific is this speed increase?

To my mind, if the speed difference between equally clocked Yonah & Merom machines is fairly easily noticed by an experienced user in an Apple Store playing around for a while, the problem will take care of itself to a certain degree.

gc

At the same clock you should see a %20 increase in performance with Merom over Yonah. Twice the L2 cache is going to help but really it's the extra issue in the core. Netburst and even the AMD chips are all 3-Issue cores. It's like tossing a few more buckets on a Watermill the rotation speed doesn't change(Mhz) but what you can carry during that rotation does.

I've heard that it takes about a %10 increase in CPU power to notice a change. Sounds plausible and if so Merom will indeed be noticably faster.
He's a mod so he has a few extra vBulletin privileges. That doesn't mean he should stop posting or should start acting like Digital Jesus.
- SolipsismX
Reply
He's a mod so he has a few extra vBulletin privileges. That doesn't mean he should stop posting or should start acting like Digital Jesus.
- SolipsismX
Reply
post #16 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by Booga
In addition, there is no benefit to 64-bit for most uses in a laptop, ...

Other than the fact that twice as much data is processed in one instruction? Or that a single instruction can access a larger scope of registers?
Cat: the other white meat
Reply
Cat: the other white meat
Reply
post #17 of 38
I think he means most common consumer uses. iChat and itunes won't necessarily be revolutionized on the MacBook by this, but Final cut studio might. In that situation who would be benefiting?
It's only after you've lost everything that you're free to do anything.

Tyler Durden | Fight Club
Reply
It's only after you've lost everything that you're free to do anything.

Tyler Durden | Fight Club
Reply
post #18 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by Splinemodel
Other than the fact that twice as much data is processed in one instruction? Or that a single instruction can access a larger scope of registers?

The second point is valid in x86 (but not in PowerPC) 64-bit, which I mentioned. The first point, however, doesn't make much difference. "Twice as much data" when you're talking about integers or fixed-point usually *really* means more precise or more range of data. Most image processing goes through the SIMD or floating point units, or even the GPU, these days anyway. What's left going through the integer unit is usually your basic computations.

What does that leave you? It means that you can represent and operate on integers greater than 4294967296 in a single instruction. On the other hand, it means you often have to load twice as much data which are often just zeros. Thus, it tends to often be a little slower because it's rare to need numbers more than 4 billion.

All this stuff is pretty basic computer science and has been gone over in the forums extensively. But basically, in general, 64-bits means "slower" for any task that doesn't need the extra range. x86-64 recovers and exceeds (slightly) the performance because of the extra registers, but don't expect much.
post #19 of 38
Any advice for a college student needing a new laptop...I mean...notebook? At first glance it seems like waiting for the new chip might not be worth it. The upgrade doesn't seem to be huge, especially for everyday tasks, and by the time its in the macbook pros it might be too late (after mid-august).
post #20 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by Homestar06
Any advice for a college student needing a new laptop...I mean...notebook? At first glance it seems like waiting for the new chip might not be worth it. The upgrade doesn't seem to be huge, especially for everyday tasks, and by the time its in the macbook pros it might be too late (after mid-august).

I will tell you what the common advice is. If you need a computer now, get what meets your needs. If you sit and say, "Oh, I'll wait for the next revision," you will be constantly waiting for the Next Great Thing.

If you need a notebook, here is the buying guide that I have helped people with:

1) What is the physical size you are wanting?

2) How much expandability do you need/want?

3) How fast do you need/want it?

If you need something small and compact, the MacBook is the way to go. Expandability: MacBook Pro. If neither of those are all that important, go test one of each of the model out at your local Apple Store, and get the one that best "fits" you.

I hope this helps!!

-- Mike Eggleston
-- Mac Fanatic since 1984.
-- Proud Member of PETA: People Eating Tasty Animals
-- Wii #: 8913 3004 4519 2027

Reply

-- Mike Eggleston
-- Mac Fanatic since 1984.
-- Proud Member of PETA: People Eating Tasty Animals
-- Wii #: 8913 3004 4519 2027

Reply
post #21 of 38
Helps a ton, thanks a lot. My needs are not very specific except I want the best I can buy now that will last me 4+ years through college (if thats possible). I definitely want the macbook pro, just not sure if waiting for the next chip upgrade will be within the time period where I can get it or will be worth it anyways. Thanks again.
post #22 of 38
If you can wait I would buy after Apple releases the Merom MBP and then pick up a Yonah MBP for what will probably be a savings of a few hundred dollars. You really dont need any more power than what Yonah packs for 99.9% of what you need to do.
post #23 of 38
yep I cant see you getting your hands on the Merom powered MBP before September. So if thats too late I'd consider buying soon, after all they have just been updated again.
BTW, people with access to pre-release ES versions of Merom chips have already dropped it straight into an intel Mac mini and it works perfectly without a BIOS update. see page 5 of this thread http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/...t=91459&page=5
so upgrading an iMac or Mac mini will be possible, however the notebooks have their CPU's soldered onto the MB so no go there.
Idiot, slow down....

- The Tourist, Radiohead
Reply
Idiot, slow down....

- The Tourist, Radiohead
Reply
post #24 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by hmurchison
Hey! Gig Harbor in the house! I love that area man. Boy it's gotten spendy though

YEP... In da how!

But then again... everything's spendy these days most everywhere. It is worth living out here though with the simplicity of life and all but it is super BORING. Glad to have my puter's to keep me in touch with the outside world and once in a while I jump over to Seattle to root for my Seahawks. Go baby!


"Think Alike... BE Different!"
never say never!
Reply
never say never!
Reply
post #25 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by hmurchison
Yonah really is going to top out at 2.4Ghz or so and that'll come by next year so the majority of laptops will eventually migrate over to Merom. Eventually you'll see pricing parity between the two and it'll make sense to use Merom for all but the lowest end laptops.

In the meantime Merom will indeed provide that differentiation between consumer and pro for 6-9 months in the Apple arena.

I agree, but I don't agree with those who think the best chips shouldn't be in a MacBook. There are many other differentials beyond chip speed that separates the two lines. The low-end MacBook should have the cheapest, useful cpu, but why not put a Merom in the high end if you can charge more, even as BTO if necessary so that the brain dead don't get confused in the Apple Store.

I have never believed that cpu speed should separate a consumer or a pro laptop. What should be the difference is in connectivity, PCI slots, resolutions, size, durability and bundled software perhaps. I know many people who would get a black MacB with a fast processor and guess what they could make the margin the same as a MBP and so cannabalizing sales would not be an issue. More selection would actually help Apple see what the market REALLY demands and make adjustments more timely and at greater detail.
The Mother of all flip-flops!!
Support our troops by educating yourself and being a responsible voter. Democracy and Capitalism REQUIRE Intelligence and Wisdom if they are to be worth a damn beyond...
Reply
The Mother of all flip-flops!!
Support our troops by educating yourself and being a responsible voter. Democracy and Capitalism REQUIRE Intelligence and Wisdom if they are to be worth a damn beyond...
Reply
post #26 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by Homestar06
Helps a ton, thanks a lot. My needs are not very specific except I want the best I can buy now that will last me 4+ years through college (if thats possible). I definitely want the macbook pro, just not sure if waiting for the next chip upgrade will be within the time period where I can get it or will be worth it anyways. Thanks again.

5.5 years ago, I bought the first generation PowerBook G4 400MHz Titanium. I used it my past five years of college daily for all of my websurfing, apple mail, iChat, Golive (which was sluggish), iTunes, Word/Excel/Powerpoint. I also occasionally use the CS2 suite, although batch processing and more intense stuff was done on my Quicksilver 867 G4. With 768MB RAM in the PowerBook, it did the job way better than I expected.

I only carried it with me to class daily during the last year and a half, and I decided then, that my next computer would not be a 15" because something smaller would be so much easier to balance on my lap or those small desks while still using a notebook at the same time.

I urge you to think about these things when deciding on your college laptop purchase (will you bring it to class, or will it primarily sit on your desk back at the dorm/apt?)

I just ordered up a 2.0 White MacBook (adding aftermarket 2GB RAM and 120GB SATA drive) even though I think it is still slightly heavier and larger than I'd like, just because I've been waiting for a good PB 12" upgrade for a year and a half, and it looks like one won't come soon.

I really needed a new laptop, as I now have 4 years of graduate school in front of me. If Apple comes out with a convertible tablet 12-13" sized laptop under $2,000 with the features of the MacBook (and hopefully a dedicated GPU and aluminum casing), the MacBook will be on Ebay faster than you can say "HALLELUJAH!"
post #27 of 38
maybe i am the only one to care but the current aluminium design of the macbook pro and the previous powerbook g4 hasn't changed drastically for over three years. i know that the macbook pro is slimmer and wider, but it still looks the same really. i recently sold my beloved black powerbook g3 and i am planning to farewell my 17' iMac G4 by the end of this year as well and head over to macbook pro land. hopefully adobe cs3 is not too far off then, but i hope that the speed increase of merom will help make rosetta apps a bit zippier.

i got very excited when the black macbooks came out, and would absolutely love a new macbook pro design as well. isn't it time for a refresh? i originally thought the change to intel would have been the perfect time to changeover the look of the pro laptops as well. not that i mind the current design, but a macbook pro in a new case design would definitely make me more excited about laying down a few grand rather than getting the same old powerbook design.

now a black macbook pro would be something... do you think the macbook pro design will get a refresh soon or not for a long time?
post #28 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by hwaechter
now a black macbook pro would be something... do you think the macbook pro design will get a refresh soon or not for a long time?

I wonder, what would a MBP look like as a black, brushed metal. From what I can see in my head, pretty darn sexy.

-- Mike Eggleston
-- Mac Fanatic since 1984.
-- Proud Member of PETA: People Eating Tasty Animals
-- Wii #: 8913 3004 4519 2027

Reply

-- Mike Eggleston
-- Mac Fanatic since 1984.
-- Proud Member of PETA: People Eating Tasty Animals
-- Wii #: 8913 3004 4519 2027

Reply
post #29 of 38
It's only after you've lost everything that you're free to do anything.

Tyler Durden | Fight Club
Reply
It's only after you've lost everything that you're free to do anything.

Tyler Durden | Fight Club
Reply
post #30 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by websnap
Wonder no more

shame though that the keyboard, ports and drive slot are still silver though...
post #31 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by hwaechter
shame though that the keyboard, ports and drive slot are still silver though...

Funny that lots of people are complaining about the MacBook coming in only white or black without an aluminum option, and it goes the other way with the MBPs only available in aluminum.
post #32 of 38
IMO a bigger deal than the processor is the second Merom generation SantaRosa chipset's support for 802.11n WiFi. Downloading a 1/2 hr HD video in 45 seconds rather than 10 minutes (802.11g) or 45 minutes (802.11b) going to mean more to many ordinary notebook users than a Photoshop transform dropping from 6 seconds to 4.
post #33 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by OccamsAftershave
IMO a bigger deal than the processor is the second Merom generation SantaRosa chipset's support for 802.11n WiFi. Downloading a 1/2 hr HD video in 45 seconds rather than 10 minutes (802.11g) or 45 minutes (802.11b) going to mean more to many ordinary notebook users than a Photoshop transform dropping from 6 seconds to 4.

That's an understatement and I agree. If Apple would allow the wireless connection to initialize at the login screen when doing a fresh boot. I could permanantly ditch the wires.
Hard-Core.
Reply
Hard-Core.
Reply
post #34 of 38
But seeing that virtually noone has that kind of bandwidth to serve you... 802.11n is cool, and I look forward to it, but last I checked, even a T3 is 30Mb/ sec, and 802.11g is 54Mb. Do you have even a T3?
post #35 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by 1337_5L4Xx0R
But seeing that virtually noone has that kind of bandwidth to serve you... 802.11n is cool, and I look forward to it, but last I checked, even a T3 is 30Mb/ sec, and 802.11g is 54Mb. Do you have even a T3?

Home networking is what I am referring too.
Hard-Core.
Reply
Hard-Core.
Reply
post #36 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by natec


I just ordered up a 2.0 White MacBook (adding aftermarket 2GB RAM and 120GB SATA drive) even though I think it is still slightly heavier and larger than I'd like, just because I've been waiting for a good PB 12" upgrade for a year and a half, and it looks like one won't come soon.

which aftermarket drive?? and then what did you do with the native hd?? how hard/easy was it.

if easy then you'd suggest buying the smallest drive and adding your own?? how did you transfer from the origianal hd to the new one?? i'd sure like one of those perpendicular drives in my mb or mbp i'll get this winter
I APPLE THEREFORE I AM
Reply
I APPLE THEREFORE I AM
Reply
post #37 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by NOFEER
which aftermarket drive?? and then what did you do with the native hd?? how hard/easy was it.

if easy then you'd suggest buying the smallest drive and adding your own?? how did you transfer from the origianal hd to the new one?? i'd sure like one of those perpendicular drives in my mb or mbp i'll get this winter

I got the Seagate Momentus 5400.2 series 120GB SATA drive. Model ST9120821AS. I paid $175 shipped i believe, from computergiants.com, but since then they have drastically raised the price, and it took them 4 days to ship my drive, and only then because i called and nagged them about 4 times in one day I think, so I don't recommend them.

A quick search of some shopping sites yielded this list of stores and prices.
http://geek.pricegrabber.com/search_...terid=10598364

The actual install of the drive is the EASIEST of any ever that I've done on Apple's Laptops (and I've done their Pismo G3 PowerBook, Wallstreet G3 PowerBook, Titanium G4 PowerBook, and iBook G4).

It literally takes 5 minutes. You just remove the L-shaped bracket that covers the ram slots in the battery bay (3 screws, they stay in the bracket). Grab the little plastic tab and pull out the hard drive (it's in a little carrier). Remove the 4 torx-8 screws on the carrier to remove the stock drive and screw your new drive in. Slide the whole carrier back into the drive slot and replace the L-Bracket.

So I suggest buying the smallest (60GB) stock drive you can and installing the largest one you can afford afterwards. As for transfering the data, I hadn't really installed anything on my stock macbook drive, so i took the opportunity to do a clean install from Apple's install CDs. That way I was able to customize the installation and not install the iWork trials, office trials, and the 2GB of languages I wouldn't use.

Then I manually copied over my data and some preferences and keychains from a firewire backup of my old laptop (but very few preference files so that I could have the cleanest newest install possible- my old laptop had been through about 4 migrations of old computers and still had hundreds of classic programs that I never used anymore at all and I didn't even want to copy them over).

If you want to keep your stock drive as a backup drive (or keep a fresh clean install on it in case you need to send your computer to apple for repair- that way you can just throw the stock drive back in and not worry about them reformmating or seeing your private data) the cheapest way to plug it in would probably be this: http://www.newertech.com/products/pr...univ_adptr.php

I just received a non-branded version of this exact same cable setup and it worked for my stock 60GB drive perfectly, and it will also let me plug in a bare 5.25" DVD-Burner or 3.5" desktop IDE drive as needed. It's not really portable, since the bare drives aren't protected in a case, but it's good for quick and dirty drive recoveries or backups.
post #38 of 38
After reading that I want to puke. I go out and buy a MBP after waiting for a 12" iBook update and then Apple goes and makes changing the HDD like wiping your butt comparted to my MBP. You figure they would make it that easy on the pro line instead.

Here's to thinking different!

Quote:
Originally posted by natec
I got the Seagate Momentus 5400.2 series 120GB SATA drive. Model ST9120821AS. I paid $175 shipped i believe, from computergiants.com, but since then they have drastically raised the price, and it took them 4 days to ship my drive, and only then because i called and nagged them about 4 times in one day I think, so I don't recommend them.

A quick search of some shopping sites yielded this list of stores and prices.
http://geek.pricegrabber.com/search_...terid=10598364

The actual install of the drive is the EASIEST of any ever that I've done on Apple's Laptops (and I've done their Pismo G3 PowerBook, Wallstreet G3 PowerBook, Titanium G4 PowerBook, and iBook G4).

It literally takes 5 minutes. You just remove the L-shaped bracket that covers the ram slots in the battery bay (3 screws, they stay in the bracket). Grab the little plastic tab and pull out the hard drive (it's in a little carrier). Remove the 4 torx-8 screws on the carrier to remove the stock drive and screw your new drive in. Slide the whole carrier back into the drive slot and replace the L-Bracket.

So I suggest buying the smallest (60GB) stock drive you can and installing the largest one you can afford afterwards. As for transfering the data, I hadn't really installed anything on my stock macbook drive, so i took the opportunity to do a clean install from Apple's install CDs. That way I was able to customize the installation and not install the iWork trials, office trials, and the 2GB of languages I wouldn't use.

Then I manually copied over my data and some preferences and keychains from a firewire backup of my old laptop (but very few preference files so that I could have the cleanest newest install possible- my old laptop had been through about 4 migrations of old computers and still had hundreds of classic programs that I never used anymore at all and I didn't even want to copy them over).

If you want to keep your stock drive as a backup drive (or keep a fresh clean install on it in case you need to send your computer to apple for repair- that way you can just throw the stock drive back in and not worry about them reformmating or seeing your private data) the cheapest way to plug it in would probably be this: http://www.newertech.com/products/pr...univ_adptr.php

I just received a non-branded version of this exact same cable setup and it worked for my stock 60GB drive perfectly, and it will also let me plug in a bare 5.25" DVD-Burner or 3.5" desktop IDE drive as needed. It's not really portable, since the bare drives aren't protected in a case, but it's good for quick and dirty drive recoveries or backups.
Hard-Core.
Reply
Hard-Core.
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Future Apple Hardware
AppleInsider › Forums › Mac Hardware › Future Apple Hardware › Intel reveals plans for forthcoming notebook chips