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What's your (longest) uptime?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I just decided to check mine - you just type the word uptime into the terminal. Normally I don't care about this sort of thing but I just felt like it today.

It's currently 42 days on my Mac Mini. Not too bad considering what I throw at it.

What's the longest uptime people have had?

Thank goodness for unix, OS 9 would've been lucky to get through a working day.
post #2 of 18
Quote:
Originally posted by Marvin

Thank goodness for unix, OS 9 would've been lucky to get through a working day.

you misspelled hour.

BTW: uptime of 22 days on my mini...damnd point release that auto reboots!
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You can't quantify how much I don't care -- Bob Kevoian of the Bob and Tom Show.
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post #3 of 18
My G5 is a server so it os always on, but I restart for software updates.
So, whatever length of time between software updates is my uptime.
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post #4 of 18
My moms PC was on for 34 days, until it decided it wanted updates, downloaded them, and restarted all by its self.
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post #5 of 18
A month or two at most.
post #6 of 18
Depends on whether software update is bouncing in my dock...
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"In a republic, voters may vote for the leaders they want, but they get the leaders they deserve."
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post #7 of 18
My up time is currently... 6 minutes.
post #8 of 18
My varies depending on dosage.
post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 
My Mini is still going at 54 days now. I don't need anything fixed with the 10.4.7 update so I might be able to push it a bit longer.
post #10 of 18
195 days, on an AL Powerbook. My wife restarted because she couldn't get on the web, but it was the router that was in need of a re-boot. Who knows how much longer it wouldv'e gone.

2nd best was 113 days on a Quicksilver.

Average is a couple weeks to a month.

Do what you will, but harm none.

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Do what you will, but harm none.

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post #11 of 18
Why would you want to keep your computer on 24/7?

Unlike Windows, Mac OS X starts very quickly.

When I'm not using it durring the day or while I'm sleeping, I just turn it off.
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Why would you want to keep your computer on 24/7?

Unlike Windows, Mac OS X starts very quickly.

True, however, also like unlike windows, OS X doesn't really slow down if you leave it running either.

For me I simply love that I can open my laptop, or move the mouse on my G5 and be working in a matter of seconds.

I have begun to rely on the fact

There is nothing worse than having a flash of inspiration for a project but loosing the incentive while you wait to boot up.

For me, all three of my mac's run pretty much 24/7 (albeit mostly in standby) and only really ever reboot to install updates

As for my record... well my mom's eMac ran for almost 9 months without a reboot, cause i was away from home for that time, and she was too scared to install software updates.

I got home and the thing was still running fine, although i had several hundred meg of updates to install... so that was fun
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally posted by icfireball
Why would you want to keep your computer on 24/7?

Unlike Windows, Mac OS X starts very quickly.

When I'm not using it durring the day or while I'm sleeping, I just turn it off.

Yeah, but computer sleep time counts as "uptime" as well. So, rather than shutting down, if you just slept the machine, you would have high uptimes too.
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PM G5 Dual 2.0GHz, 2GB RAM
PB G4 1.67GHz, 1.5GB RAM
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post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally posted by drumsticks
Yeah, but computer sleep time counts as "uptime" as well. So, rather than shutting down, if you just slept the machine, you would have high uptimes too.

This is true...

But sleeping the computer does require some energy.
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally posted by icfireball
This is true...

But sleeping the computer does require some energy.

About 1% of battery power per hr. on a Powerbook. Not enough to concern yourself with, unless you're one of those people who unplugs their TV when they're not watching it.

& roughly 2 minutes from a cold start to a fully functional login, vs instant on at the tap of a spacebar, or the lifting of a lid, I'd say sleep is much more convenient. I don't miss rebooting my computer every day in the same way that I don't miss listening to the modem song.

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Do what you will, but harm none.

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post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
bitesizepancakes
For me I simply love that I can open my laptop, or move the mouse on my G5 and be working in a matter of seconds.

Yep, that's why I do it too. I also have my TV guide on it so it's there when I need it.

Plus, I think booting and restarting wears out your hardware more than keeping it running. I imagine it follow a similar principle to a light bulb which is most likely to blow when it's being switched on/off.
post #17 of 18
Last login: Tue Jun 27 10:40:19 on console
Welcome to Darwin!
"blah blah'"s-Computer:~ "blahblah"$ uptime
9:21 up 6 days, 22:42, 2 users, load averages: 0.39 0.60 0.71
"blah blah'"s-Computer:~ "blahblah"$


1) What's the $ mean, in my user ID. (It's not part of my ID.)
2) Why are there 2 users, when I'm the only one logging on to my computer?
3) That's lousy up-time! I was up for months, until recently, when I had 2 or 3 crashes with-in a week.
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally posted by Ptrash
1) What's the $ mean, in my user ID. (It's not part of my ID.)

That's part of the prompt. The root user usually has a "%" prompt, whereas others usually have a "$" prompt.

Quote:
2) Why are there 2 users, when I'm the only one logging on to my computer?

The other user is you, too, only graphically. You can see further information about this using "w" or "who"; either will give you a list of logged-in users. Those with "console" are graphically logged in; those with "p(n)" or "tty(n)" are in textual terminals.
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