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The next iMac - Page 5

post #161 of 177
Also, Microsoft charges for file/print, mail, streaming server, etc. And customers are looking for a less costly to implement and support option.

I know, I used to sell Microsoft crap into corporate and government accounts for years and the customers would always complain about Microsoft ripping them off.
post #162 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank

So working in a Photo lab makes you an expert?

Hmmm.....

Well, let's see how much of what you said doesn't hold water. Just my 2 cents.

1. Apple currently sells Xserves to plenty of Fortune 1000 companies and many are waiting for the Intel Xserves to be released.
2. Oracle Database and 10G apps run on Xserves.
3. Apple does have user installable service parts for their Xserves.
4. Plenty of high end Enterprise apps run on xserves including Remedy, SAP, and others that Enterprise Customers need.
5. They don't need the security software like the others since you can lock down an Xserve so it doesn't get hacked into. There is a White Paper issued by the CIA. Oh, the CIA doesn't use Windows from my understanding. It isn't secure.
6. Plenty of abilities out there and it is always going to get better.
7. The Roll Out strategy of having computers for three years is not what companies do since the others are always changing their systems around just like Apple. Some may have these requirements, but not ALL. Computer technology doubles every 18 months.
8. Apple does support older computers. AppleCare is a three year service contract.
9. Apple does have a Consulting Services. http://www.apple.com/services/consulting/
10. What Audio Company did you work for?

Apparently, you didn't understand my bio.

And you really don't know what you are talking about.
post #163 of 177
Really? Wow.
What about my email doesn't make sense? Please be specific.
post #164 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank

Really? Wow.
What about my email doesn't make sense? Please be specific.

First, I didn't "work" in a photo lab. I owned a commercial photo lab that employed 75 people. I also set up graphics departments in large corporations. I've been involved in this industry for a long time.

The audio company, which I was a partner in, was Magnum Opus, which we sold to JBL in 1982.

You can find the information I posted from Info World, or ComputerWorld if you bothered. Industry publications are always much better for this than enthusiast web sites, and your own desires.

We have discussed these matters several times here over time. What I said is well understood.

Apple has little interest in going into the large corporate market They've said so publicly several times. Starting with Job's remark that "The enterprise is not our customer".

It's known by Apple's marketing and focus, that the market for their servers is in a vertical application, that is, companies, schools, and government agencies that already use their machines for Apple's traditional purposes. They would be interested in using their servers as well.

This is not to say that there aren't some companies out of those areas of focus that would not use their machines.

But, surveys published in the two journals I mentioned show that there is little interest in the larger corporate world for Apple equipment. I'm not thrilled about that, but it's the truth. You can look it up.
post #165 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross

First, I didn't "work" in a photo lab. I owned a commercial photo lab that employed 75 people. I also set up graphics departments in large corporations. I've been involved in this industry for a long time.

The audio company, which I was a partner in, was Magnum Opus, which we sold to JBL in 1982.

You can find the information I posted from Info World, or ComputerWorld if you bothered. Industry publications are always much better for this than enthusiast web sites, and your own desires.

We have discussed these matters several times here over time. What I said is well understood.

Apple has little interest in going into the large corporate market They've said so publicly several times. Starting with Job's remark that "The enterprise is not our customer".

It's known by Apple's marketing and focus, that the market for their servers is in a vertical application, that is, companies, schools, and government agencies that already use their machines for Apple's traditional purposes. They would be interested in using their servers as well.

This is not to say that there aren't some companies out of those areas of focus that would not use their machines.

But, surveys published in the two journals I mentioned show that there is little interest in the larger corporate world for Apple equipment. I'm not thrilled about that, but it's the truth. You can look it up.

I just wish the iMac would get a refresh so I could go ahead and order one. I don't really need one but I am ready to get out of my G5 20" 1st gen. iMac bad. Not sure why though.

If the iMac goes Conroe, here I come new iMac. Unless the rumors star blazing that the iMac will get a quad core by Christmas.
Hard-Core.
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Hard-Core.
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post #166 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by aplnub

I just wish the iMac would get a refresh so I could go ahead and order one. I don't really need one but I am ready to get out of my G5 20" 1st gen. iMac bad. Not sure why though.

If the iMac goes Conroe, here I come new iMac. Unless the rumors star blazing that the iMac will get a quad core by Christmas.


Well, if the MacBook Pro gets the Mermom chip, maybe the iMac will get the desktop version. I seemed to have read that the current Intel iMacs have the processor on a socket so that they new chip can be plugged in for a cheap and easy upgrade without buying a new computer.

Historically, Apple has updated with speed bumps about every 6 to 9 months, just like the industry, so it is about 9 months since the iMac Intel came out, so I think we are probably due for an upgrade soon. When? Only Apple knows for sure. In the mean time, sit back an enjoy what you have.
post #167 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank

Well, if the MacBook Pro gets the Mermom chip, maybe the iMac will get the desktop version. I seemed to have read that the current Intel iMacs have the processor on a socket so that they new chip can be plugged in for a cheap and easy upgrade without buying a new computer.

Historically, Apple has updated with speed bumps about every 6 to 9 months, just like the industry, so it is about 9 months since the iMac Intel came out, so I think we are probably due for an upgrade soon. When? Only Apple knows for sure. In the mean time, sit back an enjoy what you have.

This brings up a question in me. The Merom is a drop in replacement for the Yonah, but Conroe is not. Anyone know what the upgrade path past Conroe/Merom would be? There any future drop in replacements planned past Core 2 Duo? I ask not to forgo a potential upgrade now for one later, but if Conroe can be further upgraded past Merom in the future, it would be an argument for Conroe rather then Morem in the iMac.
post #168 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross

First, I didn't "work" in a photo lab. I owned a commercial photo lab that employed 75 people. I also set up graphics departments in large corporations. I've been involved in this industry for a long time.

The audio company, which I was a partner in, was Magnum Opus, which we sold to JBL in 1982.

You can find the information I posted from Info World, or ComputerWorld if you bothered. Industry publications are always much better for this than enthusiast web sites, and your own desires.

We have discussed these matters several times here over time. What I said is well understood.

Apple has little interest in going into the large corporate market They've said so publicly several times. Starting with Job's remark that "The enterprise is not our customer".

It's known by Apple's marketing and focus, that the market for their servers is in a vertical application, that is, companies, schools, and government agencies that already use their machines for Apple's traditional purposes. They would be interested in using their servers as well.

This is not to say that there aren't some companies out of those areas of focus that would not use their machines.

But, surveys published in the two journals I mentioned show that there is little interest in the larger corporate world for Apple equipment. I'm not thrilled about that, but it's the truth. You can look it up.

Well, I hate to say it melgross, but Magnum Opus wasn't that big of a deal in the Audio World for Audio Enthusiasts which is why they got sold off. I know the Audio market pretty well, so don't even get me started on that.

Second, 75 people in a photo processing plant is NOT a big company. In addition, Apple currently sells to MANY large corporations and they have been getting the Xserves, Xraids, and other computers into Corporate America.

I know plenty of people that work at apple, Dell, etc. that sell to the Fortune 1000 crowd, and Dell is scared of Apple as they lose deals to Apple all of the time.

Oracle 10G is Enterprise level apps and they have been running on Apple Xserves for a while. So has SAP, which is what all of the big manufacturing companies use, and they run on Apple.

Go back to enjoying your retirement and stop talking about the Enterprise market. Things are changing very rapidly and the new Xserves are going to sell quite well.
post #169 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdcfsu

This brings up a question in me. The Merom is a drop in replacement for the Yonah, but Conroe is not. Anyone know what the upgrade path past Conroe/Merom would be? There any future drop in replacements planned past Core 2 Duo? I ask not to forgo a potential upgrade now for one later, but if Conroe can be further upgraded past Merom in the future, it would be an argument for Conroe rather then Morem in the iMac.

I believe Kentsfield, the quad core conroe, is a drop in replacement for conroe.
post #170 of 177
There is much debate between the Conroe and the Mermom (mis-spelled on purpose). :-)

Whichever they use, I am sure will be fine. Apple seems to be making some great machines and will continue to do so. I wouldn't worry, we will all find out soon enough.
post #171 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by backtomac

I believe Kentsfield, the quad core conroe, is a drop in replacement for conroe.

Know what the path is for Merom? Since Conroe leads to Kentsfield then I think the argument would be that the Conroe is almost a lock -- easy upgrades/speed bumps down the road. Now, if Merom has a similar structure then that changes things.
post #172 of 177
I've been asking for a quad core, 3 GHz, 16G RAM, 10K RPM 250G drive, Firewire 1600, all of the pro apps in a 17 inch Powerbook case for $1000. I guess I'll just have to wait.

LMAO!
post #173 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank

Well, I hate to say it melgross, but Magnum Opus wasn't that big of a deal in the Audio World for Audio Enthusiasts which is why they got sold off. I know the Audio market pretty well, so don't even get me started on that.

Second, 75 people in a photo processing plant is NOT a big company. In addition, Apple currently sells to MANY large corporations and they have been getting the Xserves, Xraids, and other computers into Corporate America.

I know plenty of people that work at apple, Dell, etc. that sell to the Fortune 1000 crowd, and Dell is scared of Apple as they lose deals to Apple all of the time.

Oracle 10G is Enterprise level apps and they have been running on Apple Xserves for a while. So has SAP, which is what all of the big manufacturing companies use, and they run on Apple.

Go back to enjoying your retirement and stop talking about the Enterprise market. Things are changing very rapidly and the new Xserves are going to sell quite well.

You do know very little.

There wasn't much of an "enthusiast " market in 1982. we sold the company because robert, the gentleman who started it was retiring, and we didn't want to run it. JBL wanted our patent portfolio, and professional customer list. I doubt that you even heard of the company, much less know anything else about it from what you just said.

Again, you're not paying much attention to what I'm telling you, so you can continue to ramble on about this if you like.
post #174 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross

You do know very little.

There wasn't much of an "enthusiast " market in 1982. we sold the company because robert, the gentleman who started it was retiring, and we didn't want to run it. JBL wanted our patent portfolio, and professional customer list. I doubt that you even heard of the company, much less know anything else about it from what you just said.

Again, you're not paying much attention to what I'm telling you, so you can continue to ramble on about this if you like.


melgross,

I answered to all of your concerns as to why YOU think Apple is not in the Corporate world. You have not answered in response with any detail, so you might want to rethink your position.

Have a nice day.
post #175 of 177
just to let you know, the NEW model for lots of corporate accounts is to change out 1/3 of their installed base every year with the latest model.

I used to work for GE in the late 90's. Have you heard of them? they were having LOTS of problems implementing Windows. I worked in an office with both macs and pcs and it took minutes to get the macs on the network and it took hours to get the PCs.

Since Apple has now completed the first stage of the final transition to Intel, the Corpoerate world is going to start looking at Apple. There are a lot of Fortune 500 companies that are purchasing lots of macs instead of PCs. I won't tell you whom because it is none of your business.
post #176 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank

just to let you know, the NEW model for lots of corporate accounts is to change out 1/3 of their installed base every year with the latest model.

I used to work for GE in the late 90's. Have you heard of them? they were having LOTS of problems implementing Windows. I worked in an office with both macs and pcs and it took minutes to get the macs on the network and it took hours to get the PCs.

Since Apple has now completed the first stage of the final transition to Intel, the Corpoerate world is going to start looking at Apple. There are a lot of Fortune 500 companies that are purchasing lots of macs instead of PCs. I won't tell you whom because it is none of your business.

Your posts are idiotic.
post #177 of 177
This is a TRUE story. Back in 1999, GE put in a large order for Dell, and they sent the shipment back because DELL screwed up the order. DELL screws their accounts all of the time. They just got sued, again, for shipping systems that were less than what the customer ordered. They do it all the time. DELL is the 4 letter word of the computer industry. LOL. Just look at their earnings. They are making a very loud sucking noise right now. :-)
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