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Apple introduces $899 education iMac

post #1 of 94
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Apple on Wednesday introduced a new $899 configuration of the 17-inch iMac designed specifically for education customers.

The computer features a 1.83 GHz Intel Core Duo processor, a built-in iSight video camera and iLife '06, the next generation of Apple's award-winning suite of digital lifestyle applications.

Apple said the 17-inch iMac for education is available immediately and will replace the eMac, its last CRT based computer, providing students and teachers everything they need to learn and create in today's digital classroom, all in the ultra-efficient iMac design.

"The iMac is ideal for the space saving needs of both the classroom and the dorm room with the entire computer built right into a two-inch thin display," Apple said. "The iMac design has continuously improved generation after generation, resulting in increased material efficiency, decreased packaging mass and volume, and decreased energy consumption -- all of which lead to a smaller environmental footprint."

Featuring a 17-inch widescreen LCD display, the iMac for education includes a Combo drive for burning CDs and reading DVDs, 512MB of 667 MHz DDR2 SDRAM memory expandable up to 2GB and hard drive storage capacity up to 160GB.

Every iMac also includes a built-in iSight video camera for video conferencing out-of-the-box using Apple's iChat AV, or recording a video podcast or iMovie using iLife '06.

Providing the latest in high-performance connectivity options, the 17-inch iMac for education includes built-in 10/100/1000 BASE-T Gigabit Ethernet for high-speed networking, built-in AirPort Extreme 802.11g WiFi for up to 54 Mbps fast wireless networking, a total of five USB ports (three USB 2.0) and two FireWire 400 ports.

Designed with today's digital classroom in mind, every iMac comes with iLife '06, the next generation of Apple's award-winning suite of digital lifestyle applications featuring iPhoto, iMovie HD, iDVD, GarageBand and iWeb, a new iLife application that makes it super-easy to create amazing websites with photos, blogs and Podcasts and publish them on .Mac for viewing by anyone on the Internet with just a single click. Every iMac also comes with the latest release of the world's most advanced operating system, Mac OS X version 10.4.6 "Tiger" including Safari, Mail, iCal, iChat AV, Front Row and Photo Booth, running natively on the Intel-based desktop.

Pricing & Availability

The 17-inch iMac for education is available immediately for education customers through the Apple Store for Education or by calling an Apple education sales representative at 800-800-APPL.

The eMac will no longer be in production and is available for purchase while supplies last through the Apple Store for Education or by calling an Apple education sales representative at 800-800-APPL.

Apple will showcase the 17-inch iMac and its complete line of products and solutions for education at the National Educational Computing Conference in San Diego, California from July 5-7, 2006.

The 17-inch 1.83 GHz iMac, for a suggested education price of $899 (US), includes:
17-inch widescreen LCD display;
1.83 GHz Intel Core Duo processor;
512MB of 667 MHz DDR2 SDRAM expandable to 2GB;
24x Combo drive;
Intel GMA 950 graphics;
built-in iSight video camera;
built-in AirPort Extreme wireless networking;
80GB Serial ATA hard drive running at 7200 rpm;
mini-DVI out (adapters for DVI, VGA and Composite/S-Video sold separately);
built-in stereo speakers and microphone; and
Mighty Mouse and Apple Keyboard.
Build-to-order options and accessories include up to 2GB DDR2 SDRAM, 160GB Serial ATA hard drive, iWork '06 (pre-installed), Apple Remote and Apple USB Modem.
post #2 of 94
Oh God, the entire article is an email link!

But that iMac looks pretty bang for your buck. I like.

Edit: Didn't see the intergrated graphics...Not for me then.
post #3 of 94
This makes the price of the mac mini look horribly overpriced! Hopefully this system will eventually be available to everyone, as it is a great value.
post #4 of 94
Good to see you can copy and paste, effective journalism.

Apple Press Release
post #5 of 94
Quote:
Originally posted by jaydfwtx
This makes the price of the mac mini look horribly overpriced! Hopefully this system will eventually be available to everyone, as it is a great value.

It is available to almost anyone.
If you have kids in school or college then you can purchase from the education store.
If you take 1 class at your local community college, you can purchase from the education store.

This is a great value and making a similar configuration available to the general public would be a great move.
I agree, I think we are going to see the mini drop in price.
post #6 of 94
Indeed - that's a lot of bang for buck. I wonder why there no Superdrive BTO, though.
Now running on a 20" aluminium iMac (Fall 2008), as well as a Macboook Pro 13" (mid 2009) and an iPhone.
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Now running on a 20" aluminium iMac (Fall 2008), as well as a Macboook Pro 13" (mid 2009) and an iPhone.
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post #7 of 94
Important to remember that if they sold this to the general public, it would probably be priced at $999 - the $899 is the edu price, and the existing imac models are $100 cheaper for edu buyers.

Still, even at $999 it seems like it would get a few sales. They would definitely need to bump the specs/decrease the price on the mini though.
post #8 of 94
If this isn't an indication that the Mac Pros will be quad across the line (or at the very least the mid and top config), I don't know what is.

I mean, who the heck would pay 2000 for a 2.3 or 2.6 Conroe without a monitor when you can get a very respectable 1.8 Yonah for 900 *with* monitor. Sure...integrated graphics, no expandability, etc. but still...there's a limit to the bullcrap Apple can feed pros.
post #9 of 94
Not on Europe yet.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #10 of 94
Why would anyone (with edu access) buy a freaking mini with prices like this for the much better outfitted eMac?

Will they actually lower the mini price too?
post #11 of 94
Top of the line Mini is $779...or you can get this very similarly equipped eMac for $899...hrm....
Thats a little over the price you'd pay for a keyboard and mouse, and all you lose is the Superdrive...
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15" MBP 2.53GHz Mid 2009, 4GB RAM, 640GB HD, sux0rz GF9400, 10.6.x...wish I had the money for a new 15" with the 1680x1050 display...sigh.
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post #12 of 94
Quote:
Originally posted by halo1982
Top of the line Mini is $779...or you can get this very similarly equipped eMac for $899...hrm....
Thats a little over the price you'd pay for a keyboard and mouse, and all you lose is the Superdrive...

And you gain a monitor.

Mini price has got to come down.
post #13 of 94
WOW. This is a really, really nice deal. I've been waiting for a new config to come out at WWDC to buy for my mum that's not too expensive but now I think I might buy this instead. The only thing that's holding me back is the possibility of a new Nano before the free nano education deal expires in September.

I think that it's more likely the mini specs will go up than that the price will come down. IMO the mini was overpriced even compared to the regular iMac when you factor in the cost of monitor, keyboard, mouse, etc.
post #14 of 94
The edu mini price is irrelevant IMO #1 it's a much newer product, and design than this iMac. It is also a discounted price for an actual product. This product is specifically designed for education, and is priced within the parameters of Apple's entire scholastic plan. Which would include mass sales into the pricing equation. The Mini was not intended for this nor was it priced in such a manner. Also, this iMac design is almost EOL IMO and the parts, manufacturing costs, etc. etc. etc.... have probably become far less expensive than they were when it was originally introduced. Now take out the graphics card, integrate it, and viola. The new eMac. Priced accordingly.
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post #15 of 94
Quote:
Originally posted by umijin
Why would anyone (with edu access) buy a freaking mini with prices like this for the much better outfitted eMac?

Will they actually lower the mini price too?

mini for the living room, mini for the car, mini for a server that hides away without a head (monitor). lots of uses.
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post #16 of 94
So what's the big difference from a normal iMac here..?
Is it the Intel GMA 950 graphics that makes it cheap and somewhat dull?
I guess it's good enough for schools, and that's great.
post #17 of 94
I think that unless a school was doing a lot of video editing this would be an excellent machine. I'm sure there are some teachers who visit the forum who can comment on typical usage of computers in class.
post #18 of 94
You newbies need to show a wee bit more respect. Add a bit more "content" yourselves before chiding AI. 8)

Nice unit but I'm thinking that next years iMac Edu is going to be nice if it has Conroe and a 20" version for $1299. I'll accept GMA X3000 integrated graphics but me personally I'm not buying another GMA 950 based unit. Nice price though and ready for the BtS buying frenzy
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post #19 of 94
Quote:
Originally posted by palegolas
So what's the big difference from a normal iMac here..?
Is it the Intel GMA 950 graphics that makes it cheap and somewhat dull?
I guess it's good enough for schools, and that's great.

Just looking at the simple specs under the pricing at the store...

17" 1.83 GHz Duo and 17" 1.83 GHz Duo (same)
$899 edu vs. $1199 edu/$1299 standard
80 GB HDD vs. 160 GB HDD
Combo Drive vs. Dual-Layer Super Drive
Intel GMA Graphics (64 MB shared) vs. ATI x1600 (128 MB dedicated)
No Bluetooth vs. Bluetooth
No Remote vs. Apple Remote

Does that account for $300?
post #20 of 94
Looks nice. May actually pick one up with my student loan. But I don't start school till the end of September. Hopefully the free nano deal is still going by then. But I doubt it.
post #21 of 94
Quote:
Originally posted by macbear01
Does that account for $300?

Yes it does!
post #22 of 94
i'm surprised that to put more distance between the other products that it didn't have a 15" screen.
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post #23 of 94
Quote:
Originally posted by NOFEER
i'm surprised that to put more distance between the other products that it didn't have a 15" screen.

Probably cheaper to stick with a 17" for manufacturing purposes. This is one of those machines that's not supposed to fit into their tidy consumer lineup. It's entirely for education purposes alone.
post #24 of 94
Quote:
Originally posted by macbear01
Just looking at the simple specs under the pricing at the store...

17" 1.83 GHz Duo and 17" 1.83 GHz Duo (same)
$899 edu vs. $1199 edu/$1299 standard
80 GB HDD vs. 160 GB HDD
Combo Drive vs. Dual-Layer Super Drive
Intel GMA Graphics (64 MB shared) vs. ATI x1600 (128 MB dedicated)
No Bluetooth vs. Bluetooth
No Remote vs. Apple Remote

Does that account for $300?

No, it accounts for $400 to most people and then $300 educationally.

I think many of you are missing the point here. Apple is really cutting their margin out on THIS MACHINE alone to provide the education market a very inexpensive alternative. They may reduce the price of the Mac Minis, who knows, but I highly doubt this will be available to the public like the eMac was. We'll all just have to suck it up and move on with our lives.
post #25 of 94
Quote:
Originally posted by palegolas
So what's the big difference from a normal iMac here..?
Is it the Intel GMA 950 graphics that makes it cheap and somewhat dull?
I guess it's good enough for schools, and that's great.

It's not just good for schools. It's great for Mac based small businesses with a few low level admins whose work is primarily email, Word, and the web. I've got three eMacs that are perfectly fine for light duty work. These will make a nice replacement, taking up much less desk real estate, getting current with hardware and preparing for the more distant future's inevitable Intel only OS features.

I like it.

gc
post #26 of 94
Quote:
Originally posted by backtomac
I think that unless a school was doing a lot of video editing this would be an excellent machine.

There's nothing wrong with these machines for video-editing. You don't need a dedicated graphics chip for video editing.

Whilst this machine is a great deal, I hope that it isn't "it" for Apple's educational offerings. I hope they are working on an education-specific design and that this is a stop-gap. Where's the protective glass to prevent poking fingers from damaging the LCD? Where is the option for no camera (which is an issue for many schools, apparently)?
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it's = it is / it has, its = belonging to it.
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post #27 of 94
Quote:
Originally posted by Mr. H
There's nothing wrong with these machines for video-editing. You don't need a dedicated graphics chip for video editing.

There's nothing wrong with these machines for most things. I think people forget on here that many Pros have absolutely no need for 3D graphics or even a fast CPU.

I spend most of my time editing PHP/XHTML, ObjC code and 2D work in Photoshop/Illustrator or my personal stuff in iLife. To be frank, even the educational iMac is overkill.
post #28 of 94
Do you all think this release precludes the possibility of a new eMac?
post #29 of 94
Quote:
Originally posted by Placebo
Do you all think this release precludes the possibility of a new eMac? [/B]

At the very least, it makes it unlikely. Notice also that apple.com/emac used to redirect to apple.com/education/emac (once they had removed general-public eMac sales), which now redirects, in turn, to apple.com/education. So for now, eMac is no more. I see no reason for Apple to reintroduce it; they have the mini at the lower end and the non-education-specific iMacs at the higher end. Seems to me this segment is quite saturated now. Don't forget the MacBook, too.
post #30 of 94
Yes,

I too agree that this machine will be fine for most classrooms. The computers in the classrooms wher I work are mainly for Word Processing, PowerPoint presentaions, Indesign and I do my work in Finale. I think these machines are adequate for the uses stated above. I don't know what the per unit cost of the Dells we purchased were last year, but I don't think it was much less and they came with smaller HD's (everything saved on central server), no CDR, and NO STYLE!!
post #31 of 94
I wonder why there's not even an option to add Bluetooth via BTO. Yeah, I know you can do it with a USB dongle, but why isn't it an option? The old first-generation G5 iMacs that didn't have Bluetooth standard at least let you add it as an option...
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post #32 of 94
Quote:
Originally posted by ApplePi
Probably cheaper to stick with a 17" for manufacturing purposes. This is one of those machines that's not supposed to fit into their tidy consumer lineup. It's entirely for education purposes alone.

And they said that about the eMac until they learned there was a market. It still exists.
post #33 of 94
Quote:
Originally posted by aegisdesign
There's nothing wrong with these machines for most things. I think people forget on here that many Pros have absolutely no need for 3D graphics or even a fast CPU.


I've heard of a test that showed that the "unsupported" configurations for Final Cut Studio still work fine, at a negligible speed difference, the MB did about as well as a MBP. Any operation that uses the GPU will work fine because the Intel video chip is programmable, and as such, supports Core Image / Core Video.

I have not sought out this test though.
post #34 of 94
Quote:
Originally posted by palegolas
So what's the big difference from a normal iMac here..?
Is it the Intel GMA 950 graphics that makes it cheap and somewhat dull?
I guess it's good enough for schools, and that's great.

The 950 is fine for video editing. The only area it falls down on is 3D games and CAD. Not likely a major user base for this machine.

We have been doing video editing over the years with video cards far less powerful than the 950 IG. All we need is a 24 bit output with high enough video rez for the monitor. The 17" monitor built-in here will be well served by the 950.
post #35 of 94
Quote:
Originally posted by GordonComstock
It's not just good for schools. It's great for Mac based small businesses with a few low level admins whose work is primarily email, Word, and the web. I've got three eMacs that are perfectly fine for light duty work. These will make a nice replacement, taking up much less desk real estate, getting current with hardware and preparing for the more distant future's inevitable Intel only OS features.

I like it.

gc

That's right!

A machine that sits on the desk of most secretary's doesn't need fancy graphics, a huge HD, Blutooth, WiFi, or major RAM installs. As most business machines go on desks like that, it could be of interest to companies, as Apple will likely sell this machine to the general public as well, if the outcry is loud enough (if they aren't already!).
post #36 of 94
Quote:
Originally posted by Placebo
Do you all think this release precludes the possibility of a new eMac?

Once Apple started selling it to the general public it became a misnomer anyway. This might just be an acknowledgment of that. Why call something the "Educational" machine if anyone can buy it?
post #37 of 94
"The eMac will no longer be in production and is available for purchase while supplies last through the Apple Store for Education or by calling an Apple education sales representative at 800-800-APPL."

FYI

There are NO supplies of eMacs available anywhere. When I called Apple Education, they only had refurbs, and those were only available to educational buyers (not individual education sales).

I was hoping to nab one of the last eMacs with a Superdrive, but there are NONE to be found. Every website I visit (even those that say they have stock) have no stock. Talk about scarce. I know I shouldn't have waited, but I was still hoping. Anyone know where I can find a new one?

BTW: I don't like LCD. I'm old school...prefer CRTs.
post #38 of 94
Quote:
Originally posted by CharlesS
I wonder why there's not even an option to add Bluetooth via BTO. Yeah, I know you can do it with a USB dongle, but why isn't it an option? The old first-generation G5 iMacs that didn't have Bluetooth standard at least let you add it as an option...

Schools don't want the capability for wireless Bluetooth on many machines. The idea is to lock the machines down, operationally. Bluetooth would be a nucience. By Apple removing the upgradability, they lose nothing, and save some in component, assembly, and testing costs.
post #39 of 94
Quote:
Originally posted by xebeche
No, it accounts for $400 to most people and then $300 educationally.

I think many of you are missing the point here. Apple is really cutting their margin out on THIS MACHINE alone to provide the education market a very inexpensive alternative. They may reduce the price of the Mac Minis, who knows, but I highly doubt this will be available to the public like the eMac was. We'll all just have to suck it up and move on with our lives.

The educational price of one product shouldn't be compared to the retail price of a different model. The price difference would still be $300 if it had a retail presence. The educational price of the next model up is $1199.
post #40 of 94
Oh, by the way, we might take notice of the fact that it's WEDNESDAY!!!

So much for Tuesday only intro's, that some keep insisting upon. Remember this for future arguments.
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