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Apple introduces Xserve with Quad 64-bit Xeon chips

post #1 of 30
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Apple Computer at its World Wide Developers Conference on Monday announced the new Xserve, a quad Xeon, 64-bit server featuring Mac OS X Server Tiger on two Dual-Core Intel Xeon processors running up to 3.0 GHz, resulting in performance that is over five times that of its predecessor.

"With an industry-leading high bandwidth server architecture that includes PCI Express, independent 1.33 GHz front side buses with 4MB of shared L2 cache, and fully-buffered DIMMs (FB-DIMMs), the new Xserve delivers up to four times the I/O bandwidth, up to three times the memory bandwidth and twice the storage bandwidth of the Xserve G5," the company said.

The new Xserve is Apple's most customizable server yet with over one million possible build to order configurations, including faster processors, larger hard drives and dual power supplies.

"Xserve has always been the perfect server for Mac workgroups and now it will run over five times faster for the same breakthrough price," said Philip Schiller, Apple's senior vice president of Worldwide Product Marketing. "With new Intel processors, a redesigned hardware architecture, and an unlimited Tiger Server client access license, no one can offer better price performance and manageability in a 1U server."

Xserves can be configured with two Dual-Core Intel Xeon processors running either 2.0, 2.66 or 3.0 GHz. It also supports up to 32GB of 667 MHz DDR2 ECC FB-DIMM memory with twice the capacity and three times the bandwidth of the Xserve G5. Two eight-lane PCI Express expansion slots provide up to 2GB/s of throughput each to support the next generation of fibre channel, networking and graphics cards.

Apple is offering vast storage flexibility with support for up to three 3Gb/s SATA or SAS drives that can achieve an unrivaled 2.25TB of hot-plug storage in a 1U server while advanced thermal management capabilities take advantage of the low power of the Intel processors, running as low as 65W.



Apple has made the system even easier to manage with quick deployment rails for rack mounting, a new lights out management system that lets administrators control the hardware from a remote location and by including Apple's Server Monitor software and Remote Desktop agent.

The new Xserve ships with internal graphics that can drive up to a 23 inch Cinema Display as well as industry standard VGA devices and offers an ATI Radeon X1300 256MB PCI Express graphics card for professional graphics and video applications as a build to order option.

The Intel-based Xserve will be the first system to ship with a preinstalled unlimited client edition of Tiger Server software that is optimized to run on Intel-based systems. Tiger Server integrates over 100 leading open source projects and standards-based software applications with easy-to-use management tools that make it easy to deploy for Mac, Windows and Linux clients.

Apple is offering a choice of services and support programs for Xserve including AppleCare Premium Service that offers four-hour on-site response and 24x7 technical support. For self servicing customers, Apple is offering complete Service Parts Kits to address the majority of potential field problems.

Pricing & Availability

The new Xserve is scheduled to be available in October 2006 through the Apple Store and Apple Authorized Resellers.

The Xserve base configuration includes two 2.0 GHz Dual-Core Intel Xeon processors with 1GB of 667 MHz DDR2 ECC FB-DIMM RAM, a single 80GB 3Gb/s SATA Apple Drive Module, dual Gigabit Ethernet on-board, internal graphics, three FireWire 800 and two USB 2.0 ports, and an unlimited client license of Mac OS X Server version 10.4 Tiger for a suggested retail price of $2,999.

Build to order options and accessories include dual 2.66 or 3.0 GHz Dual-Core Intel Xeon processors; up to 32GB of 667 MHz FB-DIMM RAM; 80GB and 750GB 7200 rpm 3Gb/s SATA or 73GB and 300GB 15,000 rpm SAS Apple Drive Modules; ATI Radeon X1300 graphics card with 256MB SDRAM; Combo or SuperDrive; and 650W redundant power supply.
post #2 of 30
I was 100% accurate

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post #3 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider

Apple Computer at its World Wide Developers Conference on Monday announced the new Xserve, a quad Xeon, 64-bit server featuring Mac OS X Server Tiger on two Dual-Core Intel Xeon processors running up to 3.0 GHz, resulting in performance that is over five times that of its predecessor.

"With an industry-leading high bandwidth server architecture that includes PCI Express, independent 1.33 GHz front side buses with 4MB of shared L2 cache, and fully-buffered DIMMs (FB-DIMMs), the new Xserve delivers up to four times the I/O bandwidth, up to three times the memory bandwidth and twice the storage bandwidth of the Xserve G5," the company said.

The new Xserve is Apples most customizable server yet with over one million possible build to order configurations, including faster processors, larger hard drives and dual power supplies.

Xserve has always been the perfect server for Mac workgroups and now it will run over five times faster for the same breakthrough price, said Philip Schiller, Apples senior vice president of Worldwide Product Marketing. With new Intel processors, a redesigned hardware architecture, and an unlimited Tiger Server client access license, no one can offer better price performance and manageability in a 1U server.

Xserves can be configured with two Dual-Core Intel Xeon processors running either 2.0, 2.66 or 3.0 GHz. It also supports up to 32GB of 667 MHz DDR2 ECC FB-DIMM memory with twice the capacity and three times the bandwidth of the Xserve G5. Two eight-lane PCI Express expansion slots provide up to 2GB/s of throughput each to support the next generation of fibre channel, networking and graphics cards.

Apple is offering vast storage flexibility with support for up to three 3Gb/s SATA or SAS drives that can achieve an unrivaled 2.25TB of hot-plug storage in a 1U server while advanced thermal management capabilities take advantage of the low power of the Intel processors, running as low as 65W.

Apple has made the system even easier to manage with quick deployment rails for rack mounting, a new lights out management system that lets administrators control the hardware from a remote location and by including Apples Server Monitor software and Remote Desktop agent.

The new Xserve ships with internal graphics that can drive up to a 23 inch Cinema Display as well as industry standard VGA devices and offers an ATI Radeon X1300 256MB PCI Express graphics card for professional graphics and video applications as a build to order option.

The Intel-based Xserve will be the first system to ship with a preinstalled unlimited client edition of Tiger Server software that is optimized to run on Intel-based systems. Tiger Server integrates over 100 leading open source projects and standards-based software applications with easy-to-use management tools that make it easy to deploy for Mac, Windows and Linux clients.

Apple is offering a choice of services and support programs for Xserve including AppleCare Premium Service that offers four-hour on-site response and 24x7 technical support. For self servicing customers, Apple is offering complete Service Parts Kits to address the majority of potential field problems.

Pricing & Availability

The new Xserve is scheduled to be available in October 2006 through the Apple Store and Apple Authorized Resellers.

The Xserve base configuration includes two 2.0 GHz Dual-Core Intel Xeon processors with 1GB of 667 MHz DDR2 ECC FB-DIMM RAM, a single 80GB 3Gb/s SATA Apple Drive Module, dual Gigabit Ethernet on-board, internal graphics, three FireWire 800 and two USB 2.0 ports, and an unlimited client license of Mac OS X Server version 10.4 Tiger for a suggested retail price of $2,999.

Build to order options and accessories include dual 2.66 or 3.0 GHz Dual-Core Intel Xeon processors; up to 32GB of 667 MHz FB-DIMM RAM; 80GB and 750GB 7200 rpm 3Gb/s SATA or 73GB and 300GB 15,000 rpm SAS Apple Drive Modules; ATI Radeon X1300 graphics card with 256MB SDRAM; Combo or SuperDrive; and 650W redundant power supply.

The good, the bad, and the ugly.

The market is already reacting negatively.
post #4 of 30
I want one of these so bad...

...but I think I'm going to play it ubersafe and wait for Rev B. I've waited this long another 6-8 months ain't gonna kill me.
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Always remember that you are absolutely unique, just like everyone else.
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post #5 of 30
The Mac Pro is now in the current hardware section.

Its label has Intel Xeon. Who would have ever thought.

Two optical drives and four HDD sounds great. Four 750GB HD is 3 TB of storage. But Apple did not mention the ability of RAID configuration.

The DIMM slot slide out trays are a great idea.

Five USB 2 ports, two firewire 400, and two firewire 800. For those of you accusing Apple of abandoning firewire. Dual Gigabit ethernet.

A pretty solid machine, I still feel Apple should offer a lower cost desktop model however.
post #6 of 30
Rock and F'ing Roll \\m/
post #7 of 30
A shame about the shipping delay of a couple of months, but the new Xserve has got two very important new features: dual redundant power supplies and lights-out management hardware are two huge features that will greatly increase the Xserve's appeal in the enterprise.
post #8 of 30
The shipping delay is probably to get Tiger Server for Intel out for general seeding/testing.
post #9 of 30
I wonder if they are now quiet enough to reside in a music studio's rack....

probably not.
how cool would it be if they'd make a 2U workstation version with either passive cooling or some nifty ultra quiet fan system..... how cool... how cool...
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post #10 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~ufo~

I wonder if they are now quiet enough to reside in a music studio's rack....

probably not.
how cool would it be if they'd make a 2U workstation version with either passive cooling or some nifty ultra quiet fan system..... how cool... how cool...


I already created a thread for this topic a long time ago. Please use it.
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post #11 of 30
Finally! Production Level hard drives.

SAS support!
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post #12 of 30
Oh, never mind the great news about the Xserves, Shaw Wu will still cry like a baby about no new iPods introduced. Good Lord, Charlie Brown.

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post #13 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich

Oh, never mind the great news about the Xserves, Shaw Wu will still cry like a baby about no new iPods introduced. Good Lord, Charlie Brown.

It's not iPods. The market dropped Apple's shares today, you might have noticed. They were expecting the same thing many here predicted ( which most people will now forget). New iMacs, new MBP's, and possibly even an upgrade to the Macbook. Maybe even a newer Mini.
post #14 of 30
The market is frakked up then. Those Mac Pros and XServes are pretty hot.

I wouldn't be surprised to see Leopard Server make major gains, and then we see Apple pick up noticeable back-end marketshare (only a few percent more, but on the board as a server system).

And I would be surprised if Apple doesn't double its workstation sales. I mean, even if you wipe OS X, install Windows, and add more RAM, you're still cheaper than the equiv Dell.

And that boosts software sales, because it's more pro machines that can run FCS.

This was a great day for Apple, market be damned.
post #15 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZachPruckowski

The market is frakked up then. Those Mac Pros and XServes are pretty hot.

I wouldn't be surprised to see Leopard Server make major gains, and then we see Apple pick up noticeable back-end marketshare (only a few percent more, but on the board as a server system).

And I would be surprised if Apple doesn't double its workstation sales. I mean, even if you wipe OS X, install Windows, and add more RAM, you're still cheaper than the equiv Dell.

And that boosts software sales, because it's more pro machines that can run FCS.

This was a great day for Apple, market be damned.

Well, investors look a bit more deeply than we usually do here. They have more familiarity with the industries needs. It's their business, after all.

But, a lot of this is Apple's fault. It all goes back to the secrecy. Apple, by their silence, leads people to believe that they will introduce many things at these public events, because they so often do. When they don't, they get hurt. That's why I've always argued that Apple should just release products when they are ready, and not hold special events. That way, no one will expect more than they have a right to at any particular time. And Apple's stock won't go bumpiddy bump.
post #16 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross

Well, investors look a bit more deeply than we usually do here. They have more familiarity with the industries needs. It's their business, after all.

But, a lot of this is Apple's fault. It all goes back to the secrecy. Apple, by their silence, leads people to believe that they will introduce many things at these public events, because they so often do. When they don't, they get hurt. That's why I've always argued that Apple should just release products when they are ready, and not hold special events. That way, no one will expect more than they have a right to at any particular time. And Apple's stock won't go bumpiddy bump.



And whom might they be?

Just imagine what would have happened if Apple had announced the much rumored iToilet!

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post #17 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by franksargent



And whom might they be?

Institutions that own hundreds of thousands of shares, or even millions.

Quote:

post #18 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross

Institutions that own hundreds of thousands of shares, or even millions.



Whoda thunk?

But more importantly, what you ascribe to Apple's secrecy, I'd ascribe to normal stock trading patterns surrounding ANY company's product announcements. My quick look at AAPL suggests that neither the price fluctuation or volumes traded are unusual from yesterday versus almost any other typical trading day of AAPL stock. Much ado about nothing!

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post #19 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by franksargent



Whoda thunk?

But more importantly, what you ascribe to Apple's secrecy, I'd ascribe to normal stock trading patterns surrounding ANY company's product announcements. My quick look at AAPL suggests that neither the price fluctuation or volumes traded are unusual from yesterday versus almost any other typical trading day of AAPL stock. Much ado about nothing!


Well, that's not really true. you have to look more broadly. After Apple's events, stock prices often dip, after they had risen beforehand. Expectations build up, and then are let down.
post #20 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross

Well, that's not really true. you have to look more broadly. After Apple's events, stock prices often dip, after they had risen beforehand. Expectations build up, and then are let down.

Yes, but you can't have it both ways. Either these nebulous expert investors to whom you refer actually do know things--in which case they would have known for a fact that Apple wouldn't have introduced new iMacs and upgraded MacBooks at a pro-oriented event when they wanted their new professional hardware and Leopard to be the focus--OR they're the same idiots that invest in all the other stocks on the market and that make it the utterly irrational crapshoot of an institution that it is.

BTW, one of the standard truisms of investing is "buy on the rumor, sell on the news" when the market actually IS impressed by a product announcement, the stock in question usually goes down as a result. For it to go up would be an anomaly.
post #21 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Feste

Yes, but you can't have it both ways. Either these nebulous expert investors to whom you refer actually do know things--in which case they would have known for a fact that Apple wouldn't have introduced new iMacs and upgraded MacBooks at a pro-oriented event when they wanted their new professional hardware and Leopard to be the focus--OR they're the same idiots that invest in all the other stocks on the market and that make it the utterly irrational crapshoot of an institution that it is.

BTW, one of the standard truisms of investing is "buy on the rumor, sell on the news" when the market actually IS impressed by a product announcement, the stock in question usually goes down as a result. For it to go up would be an anomaly.

That's not what I'm saying, that they know things about what Apple is doing. I'm saying just the opposite, that Apple should let us, and them know.

What they know, is what Apple has to do to get sales in many places. They then expect that Apple will be making certain moves, based on past actions by Apple unser certain cercumstances, and react accordingly. If Apple doesn't meet those expectations, they react accordingly again, like today so far.

Your last paragraph is again, only partly correct. when the market is impressed by an announcement, the stock goes up, not down.

Companies go from peak to peak, or trough to trough.

Up until this year, Apple has been going from peak to peak. A counter example is GTW, which has (and still is) going from trough to trough.
post #22 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross

Well, that's not really true. you have to look more broadly. After Apple's events, stock prices often dip, after they had risen beforehand. Expectations build up, and then are let down.



EXACTLY! They peak (or crest) just before the product announcement, and fall afterwards, I thought this was obvious (although I wouldn't say this happens 100% of the time, perhaps most of the time, or perhaps the probability of exceedance is greater than 50%).

So here's a first thought experiment, take the daily price fluctiation and divide by the daily average trading price (this is a precentage, i. e. yesterday's was about 4%), do this for 5 years of record, form a PDF (obviously it's one-sided), and where would yesterday's 4% fluctuation fall in this distribution, my guess would be a probability of exceedance in excess of 10-20% (maybe higher), so it may not be typical, but it also isn't highly unusual either. That was my point. Now you do lose sight of some key information (i. e. a keynote at 12 noon ET), that would help to explain that day's price fluctuation, however if I were to select 30 shapes (demeaned and normalized (divided by max - min)) that looked somewhat similar to yesterday's (including yesterday's, the others would be unrelated to any preceived Apple influence (granted perhaps this is somewhat subjective (i. e. define Apple influence))) and asked you to pick out yesterday's from that sample, do you really think you could "guess" the correct one greater than random statistical probability? Perhaps you are also good at reading palms?

You mentioned in a follow-on post that companies go from peak-to-peak (crest-to-crest) or trough-to-trough, what do you suppose comes between those crests (troughs!) or troughs (crests!)? Please explain?

I have a great deal of experience WRT ocean (and laboratory) wave time series, have done all kinds of time-domain (up/down/zero crossing) and frequency domain (FFT) analyses, low/high/bandpass filtering of said time series. Harmonic analyses, wave-height distributions (PDF's), wave-height-period (joint PDF) distributions.

So here's an second thought experiment, take 30 NYSE companies each with 5 years of price fluctuation records (say 15 minute samples (or however often the prices are posted)), pass these through a low-pass cutoff filter set to a 1-month cutoff frequency (i. e. eliminate all information greater than 1-month), FFT these filtered time series (or just FFT the raw time series and zero out the frequencies lower than 1/1-month) and look at the resulting spectra. My guess is that the resulting time series might not look significantly different from white noise spectra (broad distribution of price density with no distinct shape, particularly when the shapes are normalized and ensamble averaged). As a follow-on exercise take the price indicies, multiply by the volume traded, again form as a time series, and repeat the above exercise, I have an even greater expectation that the resulting spectra will indeed look like white noise.

So while the term "crapshoot" may not be entirely correct, given that the forcing function is human nature, expectations, and rumors (or lack thereof in Apple's case), I would suggest that this term isn't too far of the mark!

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post #23 of 30
The market ALWAYS punishes Apple after keynotes. It's the basic Apple didn't announce 'widget XXX' knee-jerk reaction. Anyone who knows Apple stock can predict that move with their eyes closed, minus 2-5% can be taken to the bank every time.
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post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hiro

The market ALWAYS punishes Apple after keynotes. It's the basic Apple didn't announce 'widget XXX' knee-jerk reaction. Anyone who knows Apple stock can predict that move with their eyes closed, minus 2-5% can be taken to the bank every time.



Agree! But if there's a price runup prior to the keynote, with the expectation (as you've stated a "no brainer") of a reduction afterward, and you bought prior to the runup (on purpose, since you know the pattern a priori), and you sell during the keynote (expecting it to peak), then you take home +2-5%, and that IMHO is what those traderz are doing (buy low sell high). This is a positive feedback mechanism, since once selling begins, the price reduction continues, more people "get out" and the downward trend continues?

Is that what you meant?

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post #25 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katsudon

The shipping delay is probably to get Tiger Server for Intel out for general seeding/testing.

You can buy the Universal version of Mac OS X Server today, so that's not the reason for the dealy.

PS: Sorry for actually discussing on topic stuff
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95% percent of the boat is owned by Microsoft, but the 5% Apple controls happens to be the rudder!
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post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by franksargent



EXACTLY! They peak (or crest) just before the product announcement, and fall afterwards, I thought this was obvious (although I wouldn't say this happens 100% of the time, perhaps most of the time, or perhaps the probability of exceedance is greater than 50%).

So here's a first thought experiment, take the daily price fluctiation and divide by the daily average trading price (this is a precentage, i. e. yesterday's was about 4%), do this for 5 years of record, form a PDF (obviously it's one-sided), and where would yesterday's 4% fluctuation fall in this distribution, my guess would be a probability of exceedance in excess of 10-20% (maybe higher), so it may not be typical, but it also isn't highly unusual either. That was my point. Now you do lose sight of some key information (i. e. a keynote at 12 noon ET), that would help to explain that day's price fluctuation, however if I were to select 30 shapes (demeaned and normalized (divided by max - min)) that looked somewhat similar to yesterday's (including yesterday's, the others would be unrelated to any preceived Apple influence (granted perhaps this is somewhat subjective (i. e. define Apple influence))) and asked you to pick out yesterday's from that sample, do you really think you could "guess" the correct one greater than random statistical probability? Perhaps you are also good at reading palms?

You mentioned in a follow-on post that companies go from peak-to-peak (crest-to-crest) or trough-to-trough, what do you suppose comes between those crests (troughs!) or troughs (crests!)? Please explain?

I have a great deal of experience WRT ocean (and laboratory) wave time series, have done all kinds of time-domain (up/down/zero crossing) and frequency domain (FFT) analyses, low/high/bandpass filtering of said time series. Harmonic analyses, wave-height distributions (PDF's), wave-height-period (joint PDF) distributions.

So here's an second thought experiment, take 30 NYSE companies each with 5 years of price fluctuation records (say 15 minute samples (or however often the prices are posted)), pass these through a low-pass cutoff filter set to a 1-month cutoff frequency (i. e. eliminate all information greater than 1-month), FFT these filtered time series (or just FFT the raw time series and zero out the frequencies lower than 1/1-month) and look at the resulting spectra. My guess is that the resulting time series might not look significantly different from white noise spectra (broad distribution of price density with no distinct shape, particularly when the shapes are normalized and ensamble averaged). As a follow-on exercise take the price indicies, multiply by the volume traded, again form as a time series, and repeat the above exercise, I have an even greater expectation that the resulting spectra will indeed look like white noise.

So while the term "crapshoot" may not be entirely correct, given that the forcing function is human nature, expectations, and rumors (or lack thereof in Apple's case), I would suggest that this term isn't too far of the mark!


That's all very interesting, and I'm not about to denigrate you concept. I've done most of the same analysis in my own work when I designed speaker drivers/systems, and other analog and digital devices. So I appreciate the logic.

The problem here is that this is not subject to the same critical analysis. As you obviously know, as long as we have enough data points we can construct a sufficient method to work with it. Not so with human decision making.

I don't believe that we can arrive at a reliable enough method to analyze this, without spending more time that it is worth, unless, we want to come up with something that we can use for our own financial benefit.

One reason why I didn't follow through with my degree in psychology was because I didn't (and still don't) believe that we can understand all of the variables that go into even one persons decisions, much less that of a vast number.

The problem here is that we don't know exactly who is buying and selling at any given time. What percentage of day traders? What percentage of investors such as myself, what percentage of investment houses? these ratios change all of the time, and so will the effects on the market.
post #27 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross

That's all very interesting, and I'm not about to denigrate you concept. I've done most of the same analysis in my own work when I designed speaker drivers/systems, and other analog and digital devices. So I appreciate the logic.

The problem here is that this is not subject to the same critical analysis. As you obviously know, as long as we have enough data points we can construct a sufficient method to work with it. Not so with human decision making.

I don't believe that we can arrive at a reliable enough method to analyze this, without spending more time that it is worth, unless, we want to come up with something that we can use for our own financial benefit.

One reason why I didn't follow through with my degree in psychology was because I didn't (and still don't) believe that we can understand all of the variables that go into even one persons decisions, much less that of a vast number.

The problem here is that we don't know exactly who is buying and selling at any given time. What percentage of day traders? What percentage of investors such as myself, what percentage of investment houses? these ratios change all of the time, and so will the effects on the market.



IMHO, I'd agree with most of what you're saying. However, I don't think that has stopped Wall Street from hiring hunderds of PhD's with strong backgrounds in the areas of applied math/physics/engineering (one of my friends here at work was on a PhD student's committee, she was big into numerical modeling of ocean waves, anyway she now works on Wall Street making several times what she could make as either an academic or in the engineering profession). I'd also agree that both thought experiments I suggested above would not bare fruit (i. e. no discernible trends or patterns would emerge (i. e. it would indeed be white noise)), however there are probably other more advanced statistical/mathematical methods that might generate a predictable signal-to-noise ratio (Kalman filtering comes to mind, it's a real time predictor-corrector used in Inertial Navigation Systems (INS), used in all forms of vehicles, and has been shown mathematically to minimize the residual errors). Anytime, you can exceed 50% probability of exceedance (long term), you stand to gain (long term). Although most of human nature may appear to be a random process, I don't think it's a TOTALLY random process, and right off the top of my head, I can't think of an institution that generates more data than the NYSE!

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post #28 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by franksargent



IMHO, I'd agree with most of what you're saying. However, I don't think that has stopped Wall Street from hiring hunderds of PhD's with strong backgrounds in the areas of applied math/physics/engineering (one of my friends here at work was on a PhD student's committee, she was big into numerical modeling of ocean waves, anyway she now works on Wall Street making several times what she could make as either an academic or in the engineering profession). I'd also agree that both thought experiments I suggested above would not bare fruit (i. e. no discernible trends or patterns would emerge (i. e. it would indeed be white noise)), however there are probably other more advanced statistical/mathematical methods that might generate a predictable signal-to-noise ratio (Kalman filtering comes to mind, it's a real time predictor-corrector used in Inertial Navigation Systems (INS), used in all forms of vehicles, and has been shown mathematically to minimize the residual errors). Anytime, you can exceed 50% probability of exceedance (long term), you stand to gain (long term). Although most of human nature may appear to be a random process, I don't think it's a TOTALLY random process, and right off the top of my head, I can't think of an institution that generates more data than the NYSE!


That's true, and it still doesn't work in the long term. Remember a short few years ago there was a fund, I forget the a actual name right now, Long Tern Capital, or something similar. It was doing very well, and had an investment base of a trillion or so dollars that it controlled? It was run by economics PhD's, some of whom had won the Nobel Prize in economics. Do you remember the sudden collapse? Just one bad investment, and the entire thing came crashing down. It was thought that it would severely damage the entire financial community. There was panic before it was restructured.

The only way this works is to do the analysis manually. We can pick patterns out of the noise better than most any algorythms at this time when the patterns are made by human decision making. All of the physical problems are understandable, if they are not too complex. Some of them might never be subject to analysis, such as chaotic systems, where one small push can upset the entire balance, and send it into another direction. human decisions are often like that. There isn't rational thought behind all of these decisions, though at the institutional level, things are usually calmer.

But, then, some of it is pretty simple as well. I know some of those patterns. If Apple comes up with what the market expects, the stock will continue to go up afterwards. I'm not talking here about what the price will be a couple of weeks later, because the price at that time will be distorted by other market forces not directly related to Apple, except in the most general way.
post #29 of 30
Here's a good article about Apple's releases during the conf. from Computerworld, one of my favorite publications.

This article I think most will appreciate. It starts with the machines, and then goes to a good breakdown of the software.

His insights are very interesting. The article is 5 pages.

I just posted this to the Leopard forum.

http://www.computerworld.com/action/...icleId=9002267
post #30 of 30
Do we want price/feature comparisons?

Yes!

http://hardware.seekingalpha.com/article/15126
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