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Home Shooling? - Page 2

Poll Results: Were you home schooled? Check all that apply.

This is a multiple choice poll
  • 33% (17)
    I was not home schooled and I am against home schooling.
  • 39% (20)
    I was not home schooled, but see nothing wrong with home schooling.
  • 5% (3)
    I was home-schooled, and support home schooling.
  • 3% (2)
    I was home schooled, and am against home schooling.
  • 0% (0)
    I support home schooling and am a church-going Christian Republican.
  • 17% (9)
    I support home schooling and am not a church-going Christian Republican.
51 Total Votes  
post #41 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by e1618978

If you are saying that Waldorf schools create artists rather than art critics, then I agree and approve. I am an atheist, so I have no opinion about spirituality - the Wadorf school is mild enough with it so that it does not bother me.

But art and spiritual pursuits are fields few people can make a career out of. What I'm talking about isn't "artist" vs "art critic," it's "career in the arts/humanities" vs "career in anything else." While I have a couple waldorf friends who have become very successful in the arts, more than a few have not and yet are still pushing on unsuccessfully. The reason I (and a few others I know) believe this is so common is because when a waldorf student enters the real world they recognize that the development of their creativity is the most distinguishing feature, so they are far more likely than a non-waldorf educated student to fall back on it...even if they don't have what it takes to actually make a living at it. The encouragement of an idealist outlook also can foster unrealistic expectations and overconfidence.

An exclusively waldorf-educated student is also, more often than not, at a disadvantage when it comes to analytical fields, not only because of lack of emphasis on them but also because of the glamorization of the arts. For instance, a waldorf kid is significantly more likely to be accepted to a liberal arts school like oberlin or hampshire than MIT (1995-2004 - oberlin: 82, Hampshire: 55, MIT: 2. pdf).

I've seen more than enough problems with how waldorf alums transition to adulthood to know that use of the school has to be handled with care. I strongly share the values its founded on and agree with the philosophy behind it (including anthroposophy), but I have a difficult time endorsing students being exclusively educated within it.

Now, I'm in no way saying that waldorf grads can't be successful in other fields. Quite the contrary. I strongly believe in the value of a waldorf education, but I recognize that there are weaknesses. It's all a trade-off. After all, I believe that a waldorf alum can potentially have a major advantage over non-waldorf students when it comes to the arts and humanities.
post #42 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by giant

An exclusively waldorf-educated student is also, more often than not, at a disadvantage when it comes to analytical fields, not only because of lack of emphasis on them but also because of the glamorization of the arts. For instance, a waldorf kid is significantly more likely to be accepted to a liberal arts school like oberlin or hampshire than MIT (1995-2004 - oberlin: 82, Hampshire: 55, MIT: 2. pdf).

In your study 2 out of 2776 students went to MIT (0.072%), which is almost four times higher than the national average for the 10 year study (10,000 enrolled/45 million graduates = (0.022%).

I realize that a lot of students will go to liberal arts schools, but if you go look at a Waldorf high school science class, you will realize that it is taught the way it should be (i.e. not like public schools). The students do the experiments and formulate their own theories before being taught the "real theory" behind the experiment - there is no faking experiment data to get the right result like we did in public school.

I think that a lot of the artistic bias for post-secondary work comes from the reputation of the school - people with artistic kids send them there in the first place. I don't agree that it is a result of the teaching philosophy.
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post #43 of 45
I'm not very familiar with this Waldorf thing, but it sounds like a diet, and in more ways than one. I'm skeptical of any school that claims to have some new or better way of teaching. If some technique has been shown to work, then any teacher or school could adopt those techniques. You shouldn't need to go to a particular school.
post #44 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by BRussell

I'm not very familiar with this Waldorf thing, but it sounds like a diet, and in more ways than one. I'm skeptical of any school that claims to have some new or better way of teaching. If some technique has been shown to work, then any teacher or school could adopt those techniques. You shouldn't need to go to a particular school.

Waldorf education is hardly new, the first school opened in 1919, and by your reasoning, all schools should be the same.
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post #45 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by e1618978

almost four times higher than the national average

Can you really compare waldorf to the national average? The demographics of its student body aren't really reflective of the american student body at large, to put it mildly.
Quote:
I realize that a lot of students will go to liberal arts schools, but if you go look at a Waldorf high school science class, you will realize that it is taught the way it should be (i.e. not like public schools).

The two main high schools here on chicago's north shore have interesting and innovative programs and facilities that waldorf simply couldn't offer. At least here, the option isn't between waldorf and a bad public school system. Quite the opposite.

edit: I feel like this is being taken like I disagree with waldorf education when I actually don't at all. I'm strongly considering sending my kids to a waldorf school for at least some of their education, but I've long been trying to determine what the right balance is so that weak areas of the method are filled in though other outlets.
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