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Apple sells 125,000 movie downloads in first week - Page 3

post #81 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich

"more expensive than a DVD.

Not true of iTunes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich

absurdly restrictive on how the consumer uses the movie

Also true of iTunes, but he may argue that the forthcoming iTV lessens this.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich

delivers lower resolution than a DVD

Also true of iTunes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich

and requires running a cable from the PC to the TV if you want to watch the movie on something larger than a PC monitor"

Currently, this is also true of iTunes, but again he may argue that the iTV lessens this problem for iTunes.

It would seem there's plenty of room for him to quite like the iTunes Movies service.
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post #82 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich

From the article---

Amazon.com's Unbox is a horror show. The Unbox service appears not so much to have been introduced as to have escaped from the laboratory.

Of all the smart and talented people at Amazon, did no one dare say, "Wait, our new service bites! It's slower than a trip to Blockbuster, more expensive than a DVD, absurdly restrictive on how the consumer uses the movie, delivers lower resolution than a DVD, and requires running a cable from the PC to the TV if you want to watch the movie on something larger than a PC monitor"?

Apple's iTunes media store, meanwhile, is the feel-good movie download service of the summer, and builds on the same style and ease of use that has made iTunes the world's leading legal download service for music and television shows. But my local cineplex or cable TV service offers more movie choices than iTunes (which I'll review in detail on Thursday) does at this point, and the missing link - getting the movie from the PC to the TV - is still missing. I think I'll wait for the sequel.

Although it's damning of Amazon's service, the article doesn't exactly sound like a ringing endorsement of either service, and in addition, the comments about "more expensive than a DVD, absurdly restrictive on how the consumer uses the movie, delivers lower resolution than a DVD, and requires running a cable from the PC to the TV if you want to watch the movie on something larger than a PC monitor" also applies to iTunes thanks to absurd restrictions mandated by the studios.

The weird thing is... since Jobs is a big boy at Disney now, couldn't Apple+Disney have at least agreed on less insane restrictions for their Disney/Touchstone/Pixar/Miramax product?

I want to know the sources of the places that sell DVDs for cheaper than $9.99 that isn't used. I go back to my previous example.

I bought Hitchhicker's Guide to the Galaxy off of iTunes for 9.99. Waiting 1 minute and started watching it.

I go to Walmart, or even Amazon.com's DVD section, and its 20.09 and 14.99 respectively.

I want DVDs for less than 9.99!
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post #83 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H

Er... No.

My apologies, I thought the h.264 smoothed out the video.
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post #84 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich

The weird thing is... since Jobs is a big boy at Disney now, couldn't Apple+Disney have at least agreed on less insane restrictions for their Disney/Touchstone/Pixar/Miramax product?

I think they might want to keep all products equal in resolution. VGA is a decent enough resolution when compared to DVD, and if they manage to get masters that don't have DVD-encoder induced edge enhancement and other nasties, the actual amount of detail present in the video might be the same as what you might find on the DVD.
post #85 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjayBot

Also, doesn't Apple's h.264 (don't quote me on the number) have the information there so that when you scale it it knows what to put into the empty information places?

I think I know what you mean but aren't saying it very well. I don't think it helps scaling, it just helps in reconstructing the image with as few bits as possible using interpolation and such. I think most current consumer video codecs do that. It's complicated to explain.
post #86 of 118
..."more expensive than a DVD"...

Well, sort of. You technically "own" (or at least have a resticted usage licence to view) your iTunes digital movie, but when you compare all of the other things you don't get with it, I think you're shortchanged.

With the digital version of a movie you are shortchanged because you get no chapters, no special features, no physical DVD possible to view on other devices (this includes no case with artwork, and other nifty printed items that are common today).

You can decide if it's worth the money. It's not for me. I'll continue buying actual DVDs until something comes along that's better.

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post #87 of 118
Quote:
Also, doesn't Apple's h.264 (don't quote me on the number) have the information there so that when you scale it it knows what to put into the empty information places?

Nope H.264 only takes away information it doesn't do anything to replace it.

Quote:
absurdly restrictive on how the consumer uses the movie
Also true of iTunes, but he may argue that the forthcoming iTV lessens this.

No iTunes doesn't have the same restrictions he's talking about:

You can watch the movie at home or at the office, but the license agreement prohibits you from watching it in "hotel rooms, motel rooms, hospital patient rooms, restaurants, bars, prisons, barracks, drilling rigs" and certain other locations.
post #88 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM

I think they might want to keep all products equal in resolution. VGA is a decent enough resolution when compared to DVD, and if they manage to get masters that don't have edge enhancement and other nasties, the actual amount of detail might be the same.

I was more referring to being allowed to back up your own movie on DVD. Resolution is another vexing matter.

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post #89 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by G_Warren

Give us some darn TV and movies in the UK! Grrr

I share your anger and pain!! Arrrghhhggy..
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post #90 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland

I share your anger and pain!! Arrrghhhggy..

* whispers in Ireland's left ear like a scene out of Citizen Kane * "...BitTorrant..."

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post #91 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell

You can watch the movie at home or at the office, but the license agreement prohibits you from watching it in "hotel rooms, motel rooms, hospital patient rooms, restaurants, bars, prisons, barracks, drilling rigs" and certain other locations.

Many of those restrictions usually apply to DVDs as well.
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post #92 of 118
I would need to see that. I know there are restriction on screening DVD's in a public place for profit. But I've never seen restriction placed on the exact location of watching a DVD.
post #93 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H

Many of those restrictions usually apply to DVDs as well.

I have never seen any of those restrictions apply to private rooms. I don't see how it's any of their business if it's in a hotel room. Public rooms would be a different matter.
post #94 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell

I would need to see that. I know there are restriction on screening DVD's in a public place for profit. But I've never seen restriction placed on the exact location of watching a DVD.

Have you never read those warning texts that come up at the end of the credits on many DVDs? They all say that you aren't allowed to watch the DVD in public places such as hospitals, oil rigs etc. etc.
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post #95 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM

I have never seen any of those restrictions apply to private rooms. I don't see how it's any of their business if it's in a hotel room. Public rooms would be a different matter.

Indeed, the hotel room one is really odd.

But, no-one is going to enforce these ludicrous restrictions anyway, so who cares?
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post #96 of 118
Ok public places that I can believe.

Anyway the point was so far these are not explicit restriction on iTunes movies
post #97 of 118
HD is slowly making into peoples homes. Last year there were 5 HD channels, this year perhaps 10 channels. Content creators want to create HD but there is a lag and they are steadily buying the gear to add more HD programming. Until HD TV becomes standard HD downloads really won't. People's perception of value comes from their points of reference. When my main comparison is SD iTunes download isn't that bad, when HD is my baseline the download would seem sub-par. The service and downloads will advance when it is financially viable, and the value to the consumers is greater. Today the value is not greater than the "total cost" therefore even if 1080p 5.1 is feasable and would work, it doesn't make business sense. When it makes sense Apple will move forward. iTV will handle HD from everything we have seen, the modern PC and Mac is a fantastic HD decoder, and will only get better over the next year. Things will progress, and the fantastic thing is Apple is building a digital library that with only a few months worth of encoding can have the movies at HD if they wanted. Todays news of 125,000 downloads in 1 week is just the start of this new platform, and I am sure Apple has been fielding calls from Hollywood all day.
post #98 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by 05elstonc

and the fantastic thing is Apple is building a digital library that with only a few months worth of encoding can have the movies at HD if they wanted.

Can we be sure that Apple are keeping copies at a higher resolution and bit-rate than they are selling them at? They certainly don't do that with music (the publishers send Apple 128kbps AAC files, only recently was the option of Apple Lossless provided to publishers for uploading).
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post #99 of 118
After listening to Bob Iger on the Goldman Sachs call, he made it very clear that the encoding process was simple once the web distribution rights had been cleared.
post #100 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich

From the article---

["more expensive than a DVD, absurdly restrictive on how the consumer uses the movie, delivers lower resolution than a DVD, and requires running a cable from the PC to the TV if you want to watch the movie on something larger than a PC monitor" also applies to iTunes thanks to absurd restrictions mandated by the studios.

iTunes movie restrictions are more lenient: a movie (like a song) can be played on up to 5 computers (Unbox is just the computer that downloaded the movie).

Also there are chapter marks in the movies--at least in the one that I downloaded.
post #101 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich
From the article---

["more expensive than a DVD, absurdly restrictive on how the consumer uses the movie, delivers lower resolution than a DVD, and requires running a cable from the PC to the TV if you want to watch the movie on something larger than a PC monitor" also applies to iTunes thanks to absurd restrictions mandated by the studios.


Quote:
Originally Posted by scottiB

iTunes movie restrictions are more lenient: a movie (like a song) can be played on up to 5 computers (Unbox is just the computer that downloaded the movie).

Also there are chapter marks in the movies--at least in the one that I downloaded.

Thanks for the clarification about the chapters. That's news to me... maybe it's studio optional.

When I said restrictive, I also meant the practical restrictions of owning a digital format movie... as opposed to a physical DVD which can travel, be sold, traded, etc.

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post #102 of 118
"Lower than DVD quality. A 16:9 DVD movie is 720x480. An iTunes movie is 640x360. Really. Not bad, not noticeable."

FOR THE LOVE OF GOD! THE OTHER LINES OF RESOLUTION WERE FOR THE BLACK BARS!!!
YOU GET TRUE WIDESCREEN MOVIES from Itunes,NO BLACK BARS! THATS WHERE THE OTHER LINES OF RESOLUTION WENT... THIS HAS BEEN PROVEN.

buy with confidence folks...
post #103 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjayBot

This possibility of hooking up an iPod to the iTV is completely possible. On the back of the system is a *gasp* USB port. It would be very easy to hook a dock up to the iTV, but to have iPods dock straight into the system would probably defeat the purpose. I think Apple is more concerned about getting your own media to the TV, through the wireless, then ipod connectivity, which is why there is a USB port but not a built in dock.

What I was thinking was that the iTV wasn't just a transmitter, but it actually enhances the video to true, by the definition, HD 1080 HDMI output.

Wait, would that be even possible? To take a non-HD video and stream it into HD?

My only concern about the wireless is that 802.11g doesnt provide enough bandwidth to reliably stream HD content. Right now, my wireless network has a hard time consistantly streaming audio through my airport expresses... lots of drop outs.

Could Apple possibly be waiting for the 802.11n standard to come closer to finalization in order to ensure that someday if they wanted to be able to stream HD content to the iTV consumers wouldnt be stuck having to buy an add-on or a whole new device?

Being able to dock/connect an iPod directly would remove the bandwidth limitations of 802.11g and ensure that HD playback is smooth.

Quote:
What looks horrible on a large screen television depends on lot on the ability of that television to upgrade SD. The newest Sony televisions make SD look really good.

If your intent is to view videos from an iPod on a television you need some way to connect it. I don't see one wire as being overly inconvenient.

I have relatively new Sony and Pioneer TVs and neither is able to take a composite video input and scale it to anywhere near what I would consider a decent picture. I refuse to watch OnDemand movies from the cable company (SD content over DVI/HDMI connections) because the picture quality is absolutely attrocious (although the bitrate on that video is horrible too).

I'm not asking for the world, would I like HD, yes. Am I going to take a $500-$1000 gamble on Blu-Ray or HD-DVD, no. If apple can provide an easy, convenient way for me to watch movies with an acceptable picture quality on a 50"+ television with the possibility that in the future they we be able to deliver HD content, will i jump onboard? Of course.

I'm not so concerned with the resolution or the bitrate or whatever. I would just like it to have comparable quality to a DVD with increased convenience.

Heres another question that jumps to mind. I've recently stopped buying as many DVDs as I used to because of services like NetFlix and Blockbuster's movie pass (the in-store one). As convenient as both of those services are, I find myself wishing that NetFlix had a faster turnaround time (due to no fault of their own, its limited by the speed of mail. I normally have a 2 day turn around time). I also find that the catalogue of movies at my local Blockbuster pales in comparison to NetFlix.

Apple could make a killing on a $XX per month X out at a time rental service. Negotiations with studios (once more hop on board) would be tough, but if I was Apple I would lay it out to the studios like this:

"We're both in this business to make money. You need to find a new business model to combat piracy. Right now, people with services like NetFlix/Blockbuster can copy as many movies a month as they can get their hands on. We have a locked down service that doesn't allow for copies to be made, yet the consumers still can have access to your movies with lower overhead on your part; its a win-win"

I would love something like an "Instant Netflix" obviously there are details to be worked out, like how many you can check out a day (so as to stop people from essentially having unlimited access to any movie they want).
post #104 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Catman4d2

"Lower than DVD quality. A 16:9 DVD movie is 720x480. An iTunes movie is 640x360. Really. Not bad, not noticeable."

FOR THE LOVE OF GOD! THE OTHER LINES OF RESOLUTION WERE FOR THE BLACK BARS!!!
YOU GET TRUE WIDESCREEN MOVIES from Itunes,NO BLACK BARS! THATS WHERE THE OTHER LINES OF RESOLUTION WENT... THIS HAS BEEN PROVEN.

buy with confidence folks...

No, you dont.

The width is different. with iTunes you get 640 pixels wide. A DVD provides 720. Depending on the aspect ratio of the DVD (1.85:1, 2.35:1, or whatever) up to 480 lines of vertical resolution can be seen.

The movies from iTunes do not have the black bars, you are correct, but they do not offer quite the resolution of a DVD. The guy quoted in your post was saying that 640x360 vs. 720x480 is a negligable difference in defense of the iTunes movies store. You'de be hard pressed to notice a difference unless viewing on the larges of large displays.

I'de make sure I knew my stuff before going on an all-caps rant next time.
post #105 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme

* Can't burn to DVD, so can't take a movie to a friend's house without a video-capable iPod and cable....

Why not burn the file onto a data DVD, take it to your friend's house, copy to their iTunes and temporarily authorise them to play it? - if it's a good friend you can leave the authorisation on. If it's a really good friend, forget the movie!

Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme

Meanwhile, iTunes TV just got pretty good! Higher res! I can watch Galactica on iTunes FAR cheaper than I could get the sci-fi channel via cable.

I like the second point. Did anyone else notice the 'sleight of hand'? The way Apple got us to think so much about movies & pixels that the TV shows are now able to directly compete in quality with existing TV services? (iTunes is more open/convenient than a cable/sat-specific DVR & if you run out of time, watch it on the train!)

Steve's obviously had difficulty attracting other studios because he's the only player who can re-invent TV/Movies and they're scared of the power shift in distribution control ("I own SteveTV what can you do for me?") - nice way around it!

By the way - "Front Row" iTV should just be called "Front Row" (& make sure there's a stand-alone version with a Mac hidden inside)

McD
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post #106 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasong

We'll find out soon enough. If they did in fact sell more, they will have to say so. Silence likely equals less. Anyway, I'll take your bet, and say Apple sold more (I'll even disclose they sold none to me. I have an HDTV, so I'll not be buying something lower than DVD quality).

i'm not sure how good disney's sales pace really is. With 75 titles, 125,000 sales translates to around 1,667 sales per title, or about 240/day. Is that really a lot? I doubt that would be a satisfactory pace once things are geared up.
post #107 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtdunham

i'm not sure how good disney's sales pace really is. With 75 titles, 125,000 sales translates to around 1,667 sales per title, or about 240/day. Is that really a lot? I doubt that would be a satisfactory pace once things are geared up.

Uh... 125,000/7 = 17,857 downloads per day. That's the only math you can accurately do, as I assure you there were far more downloads for Pirates than there were for The Shaggy Dog. The losers in the bunch (how many folks do you think have downloaded Scorpius Gigantus?) throw your average way off.

This early in the game 17,900 movie downloads in a day is a lot, no matter how it breaks down to individual title sales. I think other movie studios will recognize this.
post #108 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtdunham

i'm not sure how good disney's sales pace really is. With 75 titles, 125,000 sales translates to around 1,667 sales per title, or about 240/day. Is that really a lot? I doubt that would be a satisfactory pace once things are geared up.

This has to be an initial burst, it's always the way with Apple. The iTunes (like the Mac) communities are seriously interconnected and Apple's not slow at push-marketing. The only way to sustain or improve this figure is to add more content or open internationally both of which are extremely likely. Although the BBC no doubt put the breaks on UK TV Shows they won't have this leverage with movies so expect UK to go live soon - I think it's Apple's biggest market outside the US.

McD
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post #109 of 118
Quote:
My only concern about the wireless is that 802.11g doesnt provide enough bandwidth to reliably stream HD content. Right now, my wireless network has a hard time consistantly streaming audio through my airport expresses... lots of drop outs.

Apple actually did not say explicitly that iTV will use 802.11g. It could be 802.11n which is expected to be officially certified by June 2007.

Apple began using 802.11g a few months before it was officially certified. This is likely the reason why Apple is waiting until the first quarter of 2007.

Quote:
I have relatively new Sony and Pioneer TVs and neither is able to take a composite video input and scale it to anywhere near what I would consider a decent picture. I refuse to watch OnDemand movies from the cable company (SD content over DVI/HDMI connections) because the picture quality is absolutely attrocious (although the bitrate on that video is horrible too).

This can depend on how you have your TV set up. It can also depend on your opinion of atrocious.

I am quite often watching digital projection of 2K dailies as well as color grading images shot on film transfered to HD on a $14,000 monitor. Pretty much everything on DVD and broadcast television pales in comparison to that. But I take it in stride.
post #110 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Catman4d2

FOR THE LOVE OF GOD! THE OTHER LINES OF RESOLUTION WERE FOR THE BLACK BARS!!!
YOU GET TRUE WIDESCREEN MOVIES from Itunes,NO BLACK BARS! THATS WHERE THE OTHER LINES OF RESOLUTION WENT... THIS HAS BEEN PROVEN.

here you go capman:

World's Easiest Explanation of Anamorphic 16:9 Widescreen Enhancement in DVDs
post #111 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by pt123

Ringtones are used hundreds or thousands of time, depending on number of calls you get. Tough to watch a movie that many time.

With the proper software you can make a ringtone yourself. I refuse to pay 2.50 for a low quality MP3 snippet, but millions of people do just that. That's the point; Quality is not such a big deal to the majority of people. if it was, the iTMS wouldn't be as successful as it is. ;-)
post #112 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by pt123

Ringtones are used hundreds or thousands of time, depending on number of calls you get. Tough to watch a movie that many time.


Life of Brian

Kevin and Perry go large

I've seen them more times than I've had hot dinners!!!

Seriously, I work in the conference industry, and I am typing this from backstage at the moment. I would love to be able to download a film while I am setting up and then watch it during the show.

Please release it in the UK soon.
post #113 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich

Thanks for the clarification about the chapters. That's news to me... maybe it's studio optional.

When I said restrictive, I also meant the practical restrictions of owning a digital format movie... as opposed to a physical DVD which can travel, be sold, traded, etc.

Chapters are, I believe, optional by studio (at least it says to in Apple's FAQ). My guess is that Apple provides guidlines for studio submissions in encoding, etc. The chapter menu within iTunes is pretty slick: pull down menu with a thumbnail and a chapter name (similar to what's on the DVD, I presume) plus a timecode.

My reply was more directed at the article than you. I hope that the future review on iTunes movie downloads says on that fact. If one can get past the idea of DRM (and I'm wishy-washy on it), having 5 computers to watch movies is, really, hardly any restriction at all for most people.

Cheers.
post #114 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianMojo

Uh... 125,000/7 = 17,857 downloads per day. That's the only math you can accurately do, as I assure you there were far more downloads for Pirates than there were for The Shaggy Dog. The losers in the bunch (how many folks do you think have downloaded Scorpius Gigantus?) throw your average way off.

I agree that your method may provide an analysis more meaningful than mine.

Quote:
This early in the game 17,900 movie downloads in a day is a lot, no matter how it breaks down to individual title sales. I think other movie studios will recognize this.

Can anyone do similar math on "hard" DVD sales of [i]POTC[i] and maybe one or two other top Disney releases, (or for that matter, on the same 75-film portfolio) to see how those sales compare to the iTunes store rate? (pls understand, i hold a substantial amount of AAPL stock, i want it to succeed in all ventures; the initial sales figure report just wasn't (isn't, yet) a sign of break-through consumer response)
post #115 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by pt123

Ringtones are used hundreds or thousands of time, depending on number of calls you get. Tough to watch a movie that many time.

Yeah, but it's a fuckin' ringtone...I mean, come on, a RINGTONE.

If we're going to go down the 'but the ringtone is used hundreds or thousands of times' path then I've got a bit of math for you.

Ringtone = 4 seconds of sound (annoying sound really) * 2000 calls = 8000 seconds of sound
Movie = 7200 seconds of sound and moving pictures

Watch the movie twice and you've used it quite a bit more than your ringtone.

edit: oh...and I'd be pleasantly surprised if someone got 2000 calls using the same ring tone. It's a bit of stretch, eh?

I've seen lots of crazy, stupid commercial products and lemme tell, $9.99 for a 640x480 downloadable movie isn't it.
post #116 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by kim kap sol

Yeah, but it's a fuckin' ringtone...I mean, come on, a RINGTONE.

If we're going to go down the 'but the ringtone is used hundreds or thousands of times' path then I've got a bit of math for you.

Ringtone = 4 seconds of sound (annoying sound really) * 2000 calls = 8000 seconds of sound
Movie = 7200 seconds of sound and moving pictures

Watch the movie twice and you've used it quite a bit more than your ringtone.

edit: oh...and I'd be pleasantly surprised if someone got 2000 calls using the same ring tone. It's a bit of stretch, eh?

I've seen lots of crazy, stupid commercial products and lemme tell, $9.99 for a 640x480 downloadable movie isn't it.

Yikes, looks like someone has some ringtone rage. Why stop at watching the movie 2 times? Why not watch it 20 times to really get your money's worth? Not only would we not be stupid, we would be brilliant.
post #117 of 118
I realize that many articles are written with one interest, or another, in mind, but it's funny to me to re-read the complaint of no way to get the content to the TV now... "maybe in 6 months".

I bought my girlfriend a 60g 5 gen, a crappy dock (which remote doesn't work adequately),and a $10.00 cable for her to take w/the ipod when she visits family, and can entertain the nieces & nephews on their tv. Because of the simplicity of the cable, I have no idea what happened to the dock, but she has bought a 2nd cable which now lays very discretely next to her bedroom TV. I realize not everyone has a video capable ipod, but my point is this.. my girlfriend has no interest in computers, and probably hasn't heard of the iTV, and she easily watches her videos where ever she likes. The picture is fine, and I haven't heard it mentioned once.

As mentioned already in this thread, you can view iTunes content just about anywhere that has a video input. As far as the picture is concerned, I was surprised by the quality the first time I saw the picture on a 65" TV, and I have yet to hear anyone complain.

I wonder what would happen if a hack were to show up on the net that would allow for the decrypting of iTunes purchased content so that people could burn DVDs, etc. I wonder if Apple would wait until after Christmas to deal with it.
post #118 of 118
There's something I haven't seen mentioned, that could really make these things FLY off the shelves. That being if Apple could broker a deal where movies area available not on the same day as the DVDs are released, but the same day the movies come to cable or satellite. That would eliminate the whole special feature argument, since you don't get those with cable movies anyway. And unlike cable, you'd be able to watch it long after it was no longer a new release. Of course this would no doubt piss off other content distributors, so I don't know if it's even possible. Maybe if it was the day after like the TV shows.

The other thing I was thinking was that this has the potential to take the wind out of the sails of the HD DVD:Blu-Ray format war, at least as far as movies are concerned. I still seeing them being viable for storage and video games, at least for the moment. This of course assumes that HD content will be available once there's a larger installed base of people with HDTVs in their homes.
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