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Apple issues AirPort, Security software updates

post #1 of 31
Thread Starter 
A new security update for Apple Computer's Mac OS X operating system plugs holes in the company's AirPort wireless software that could potentially allow attackers to invoke malicious acts.

Just the fifth major security update released for Mac computers this year, Security Update 2006-005 addresses a series of issues that could potentially allow attackers on a wireless network to cause system crashes, arbitrary code execution or elevate their access privileges.

The update is available as a 2.2MB download for the Universal version of Mac OS X 10.4.7. Apple also posted 1MB updaters for Mac OS X 10.4.7 PowerPC and Mac OS X 10.3.9.

Separately, the Cupertino, Calif.-based company issued a 1.3MB AirPort Update 2006-001 -- the first of the year -- that improves AirPort wireless connection reliability on Mac computers.
post #2 of 31
Love it!

This is a VERY good article about OS X security. It gives a good perspective as to what this is all about in reality.


http://www.informationweek.com/hardw...ntosh+Platform
post #3 of 31
Pah, I was hoping it would be 'Apple issues NEW Airport' Are they waiting for n-certification next year?
post #4 of 31
The Airport update doesn't appear to apply to all macs. It wouldn't run on my G5.
post #5 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by jabohn

The Airport update doesn't appear to apply to all macs. It wouldn't run on my G5.

I got that too - is it for Airport or Airport Extreme?

And the Security updated installed fine on my G5 iMac, but is stalling my G4 PowerBook restart on the grey Apple screen with spinning dial.

Thanks Apple for thoroughly vetting this one.
post #6 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by umijin

I got that too - is it for Airport or Airport Extreme?

And the Security updated installed fine on my G5 iMac, but is stalling my G4 PowerBook restart on the grey Apple screen with spinning dial.

Thanks Apple for thoroughly vetting this one.

Never, never, never, install a new update of ANY kind, without first going to macfixit.com, and macintouch.com to find out what the problems are, first.

They ALL have problems of one kind or another. Whether those problems will affect you or not is something you must know before installing them.

I always do that every day for at least a week before upgrading.

Just like the new 7.1.3 Quicktime update, and the iTunes 7 update. Both have their problems. I haven't updated either yet.

When they are fixed, I will.

Same with the security update.

And then FIX permissions.

Oh, for safety's sake, verify your hard-drive first.
post #7 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by umijin

I got that too - is it for Airport or Airport Extreme?

I think I read somewhere that this only applies to certain builds of the Mac OS, specifically the Intel version, and that whatever other fixes Airport needed were included in the Security Update for the rest of us rather than a separate updater. Not sure how much of that, if any, is true.

It would have been nice if this was clarified by Apple.
post #8 of 31
Some information from Apple regarding the Airport and Security updates:

The Software Update utility will present the update that applies to your system configuration. Only one is needed, either AirPort Update 2006-001 or Security Update 2006-005.

For reference if installing from a manually-downloaded package:

AirPort Update 2006-001 will install on the following systems:

Mac OS X v10.4.7 Builds 8J2135 or 8J2135a

Security Update 2006-005 will install on the following systems:

Mac OS X v10.3.9
Mac OS X Server v10.3.9
Mac OS X v10.4.7 Builds 8J135, 8K1079, 8K1106, 8K1123, or 8K1124
Mac OS X Server v10.4.7 Builds 8J135 or 8K1079
post #9 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross

And then FIX permissions.

Well done Melgross. You win the prize.

btw. iTunes7 works fine on Macs for the most part. It's on Windows that it has more serious issues.
post #10 of 31
Was so curious when reading the article as I've been having Airport issues with my Macbook also I used to be able to get full bars in my home and I haven't moved, using MB in the same spots but now I'm lucky to get one bar
post #11 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross

And then FIX permissions.

BLARGH! Mel, you should know better then this.

1) Installing anything will already have fixed the permissions. Fixing permissions, by definition, restores them to the installer settings. If an installer doesn't have the proper permissions set (which is rare, most installers don't even touch permissions), then fixing permissions won't even work: it'll just set them to whatever permissions were in all the various installers.

2) Fixing permissions fixes like 1% of problems ever. And they're pretty easily recognizable: it happens when an app can't save files.

3) Fixing permissions very likely only ever fixes USER errors: where a user specifically went into the get info panel, entered their password, and screwed their own computer up. I don't think there's ever been a verified report of an app or process actually screwing up permissions itself.

Jon Gruber I think also has a couple similar articles on DaringFireball.net that are probably clear than I am :P
post #12 of 31
an installer can screw up permissions, but as you point out, "repairing permissions" won't fix that.

Having made installers with Apple's InstallerMaker, I can attest to the fact that it is ridiculously easy to hose permissions any way you want - that thing runs as root.
--Johnny
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--Johnny
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post #13 of 31
The Repair Disk Permissions topic has already been exhaustively covered in several places, including:

Repair permissions ( @wikipedia), referring to:

Seriously, Repair Permissions Is Voodoo (@ daringfireball.net)
Exercises in Futility Part 2: Repairing Permissions is Useless (@unsanity.org)

et.al.

There's also:

mac.column.ted: Unravelling the Repair Disk Permissions controversy (@ macfixit, via peterwooley.com)

So enough about it here, please!
post #14 of 31
Agreed. It's something to do from time to time if you really feel like it, but it has jack-all to do with the installation process.
My brain is hung like a HORSE!
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My brain is hung like a HORSE!
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post #15 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregmightdothat

BLARGH! Mel, you should know better then this.

1) Installing anything will already have fixed the permissions. Fixing permissions, by definition, restores them to the installer settings. If an installer doesn't have the proper permissions set (which is rare, most installers don't even touch permissions), then fixing permissions won't even work: it'll just set them to whatever permissions were in all the various installers.

2) Fixing permissions fixes like 1% of problems ever. And they're pretty easily recognizable: it happens when an app can't save files.

3) Fixing permissions very likely only ever fixes USER errors: where a user specifically went into the get info panel, entered their password, and screwed their own computer up. I don't think there's ever been a verified report of an app or process actually screwing up permissions itself.

Jon Gruber I think also has a couple similar articles on DaringFireball.net that are probably clear than I am :P

You're damned if you do, and you're damned if you don't.

All of you who think that you know more than Apple, don't know as much as you think.

If even one problem is taken care of, then it was worth the VERY minor trouble it took.

Gruber is a very bright individual. But, since you've taken the trouble to respond, you should know that his position on this is very controversial.

Some developers agree, and some don't.

Take your pick.

I always err on the side of conservatism. It can't hurt, and it can help.
post #16 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross

You're damned if you do, and you're damned if you don't.

I don't think you're damned either way. Unless you're dumb enough to screw around with permissions settings deep inside your system.

Quote:
All of you who think that you know more than Apple, don't know as much as you think.

I don't think Apple has ever recommended to do permission repairs, am I missing something?


Quote:
If even one problem is taken care of, then it was worth the VERY minor trouble it took.

Right, but to recommend it as an installation routine? Not only is that entirely unnecessary (in this case, it can't possibly take care of any problems, ever), it's a serious, serious waste of 5 minutes, and scares new users into thinking that Mac OS X is some kind of scary dark beast that you have to sacrifice virgins and goats to.

Quote:

Gruber is a very bright individual. But, since you've taken the trouble to respond, you should know that his position on this is very controversial.

Some developers agree, and some don't.

Take your pick.

I don't think a single developer disagreed. N00b, maybe.

Quote:
I always err on the side of conservatism. It can't hurt, and it can help.

I know, conservatism's always good (as long as it's not neoconservatism), but I think you might have fallen off the edge on this one
post #17 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregmightdothat

I don't think Apple has ever recommended to do permission repairs, am I missing something?

Yes. After every upgrade of the OS, or even update. They also reccommend to do it if you are having problems opening files, files don't open with a double click, etc.



Quote:
Right, but to recommend it as an installation routine? Not only is that entirely unnecessary (in this case, it can't possibly take care of any problems, ever), it's a serious, serious waste of 5 minutes, and scares new users into thinking that Mac OS X is some kind of scary dark beast that you have to sacrifice virgins and goats to.

Then go and argue with Apple, not me.
post #18 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross

Yes. After every upgrade of the OS, or even update. They also reccommend to do it if you are having problems opening files, files don't open with a double click, etc.

They don't. They explicitly tell you not to.

http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=106692

The only time they do tell you to is when you already have specific problems.

See "My computer keeps freezing or I see a flashing question mark" for example

http://docs.info.apple.com/article.h...en/mh1928.html

The last paragraph is misleading.
post #19 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross

Never, never, never, install a new update of ANY kind, without first going to macfixit.com, and macintouch.com to find out what the problems are, first.

I can't agree with this, reports there are unverifiable and made by people with who-knows-what 3rd party junk installed in their systems.

Quote:
They ALL have problems of one kind or another. Whether those problems will affect you or not is something you must know before installing them.

True, that's why, unless there's an urgent need, I wait until it's been reported by somewhere reputable, like MDJ.

Quote:
And then FIX permissions.


Repairing permissions is NOT a to-be-done-generally job, it's for troubleshooting only. Don't do it unless you have problems.

Again, good analysis of why this is the right advice is available from MDJ.

(I have no connection with them other than as a subscriber)
post #20 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by aegisdesign

They don't. They explicitly tell you not to.

http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=106692

The only time they do tell you to is when you already have specific problems.

See "My computer keeps freezing or I see a flashing question mark" for example

http://docs.info.apple.com/article.h...en/mh1928.html

The last paragraph is misleading.

Either I'm mis-understanding your argument or you're just completely wrong, I think what you're trying to say is that Repairing Permissions should never be done, like it has no use.

If it has no use why would it be there.

Not to mention the numerous times I have used it to fix problems and the number of times Apple recommends it.

http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=303032

http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=303593
post #21 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by abrooks

Either I'm mis-understanding your argument or you're just completely wrong, I think what you're trying to say is that Repairing Permissions should never be done, like it has no use.

You're misunderstanding. I wrote...

"The only time they do tell you to is when you already have specific problems."

You quoted specific problems. That's fine. Repairing Permissions as a general maintenance task or before/after running Software Update makes no sense and they tell you NOT to.
post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by aegisdesign

You're misunderstanding. I wrote...

"The only time they do tell you to is when you already have specific problems."

You quoted specific problems. That's fine. Repairing Permissions as a general maintenance task or before/after running Software Update makes no sense and they tell you NOT to.

Ah ok, my bad
post #23 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by aegisdesign

They don't. They explicitly tell you not to.

http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=106692

The only time they do tell you to is when you already have specific problems.

See "My computer keeps freezing or I see a flashing question mark" for example

http://docs.info.apple.com/article.h...en/mh1928.html

The last paragraph is misleading.

It isn't that they are telling you explicitly not to. They are directing you the the disk repair portion.

The freezing problem is an exterme example. But the others I mentioned are also caused by permission errors.

The last paragraph is not misleading. It is correct. One can't have it both ways. You can't point to Apple for one thing, and then say to ignore the other.
post #24 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregmightdothat

BLARGH! Mel, you should know better then this.

1) Installing anything will already have fixed the permissions. Fixing permissions, by definition, restores them to the installer settings. If an installer doesn't have the proper permissions set (which is rare, most installers don't even touch permissions), then fixing permissions won't even work: it'll just set them to whatever permissions were in all the various installers.

2) Fixing permissions fixes like 1% of problems ever. And they're pretty easily recognizable: it happens when an app can't save files.

3) Fixing permissions very likely only ever fixes USER errors: where a user specifically went into the get info panel, entered their password, and screwed their own computer up. I don't think there's ever been a verified report of an app or process actually screwing up permissions itself.

Jon Gruber I think also has a couple similar articles on DaringFireball.net that are probably clear than I am :P

I'm not saying that they fix all problems. but that 1 to 3% or so, that it does fix can be good enough.

I've been told by Apple that the reason why it is a good idea, is because some of those problems do crop up after a new install. Rarely, but definitely, a new install corrupts some permissions. Fixing them will save some problems later, if that does happen.
post #25 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross

It isn't that they are telling you explicitly not to. They are directing you the the disk repair portion.

ok, I'll play once then leave it there as arguing with you is as fruitful as trying to teach a cow to sing "Paranoid" by Black Sabbath.

To quote Apple...

"Troubleshooting an unsuccessful installation

Use Disk Utility
Start up from the Mac OS X Install CD. Use the Disk Utility application to verify the disk with Repair Disk (not permissions) of the volume you are trying to install onto. After verification or any necessary repair, try the installation again."

My emphasis.


Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross

The freezing problem is an exterme example. But the others I mentioned are also caused by permission errors.

Yes, they're specific problems. That doesn't make it true that running 'Repair Permissions' as a general maintenance procedure or during installs is a worthwhile practice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross

The last paragraph is not misleading. It is correct. One can't have it both ways. You can't point to Apple for one thing, and then say to ignore the other.

I can. It's incorrect. Get back to me when you can sing Ozzy's finest.
post #26 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by aegisdesign

You're misunderstanding. I wrote...

"The only time they do tell you to is when you already have specific problems."

You quoted specific problems. That's fine. Repairing Permissions as a general maintenance task or before/after running Software Update makes no sense and they tell you NOT to.

Ageis, as I've said, I've been told that this is a good idea, because you might have a problem like these, come up from an installation, without uou knowing it, until you do end up with a problem.

What's amazing, is that quite a few of the problems that have arisen from installs are correctable with a permissions fix.

I really don't understand what all the rankor is about over this.

It is totally harmless, and it might save someone from a problem.

Most people here are knowledgable enough to recognise a permissions error when they see one. Therefore, they can go to fix them when necessary. But, most people would have no idea as to what to do. Fixing them after an install would take of any of them that cropped up.

I don't see the problem here.

I DO understand that in theory, you don't need it. But, practice and theory, as we all know, don't always coincide.
post #27 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by aegisdesign

ok, I'll play once then leave it there as arguing with you is as fruitful as trying to teach a cow to sing "Paranoid" by Black Sabbath.

To quote Apple...

"Troubleshooting an unsuccessful installation

Use Disk Utility
Start up from the Mac OS X Install CD. Use the Disk Utility application to verify the disk with Repair Disk (not permissions) of the volume you are trying to install onto. After verification or any necessary repair, try the installation again."

My emphasis.

Yes, I agree. For an unsuccessful installation. That's a more serious problem.

Quote:
Yes, they're specific problems. That doesn't make it true that running 'Repair Permissions' as a general maintenance procedure or during installs is a worthwhile practice.



I can. It's incorrect. Get back to me when you can sing Ozzy's finest.

You may think that you're funny, but you're not.

And, there are other people here, including yourself, who are at LEAST as stubborn as I am. At that doesn't make you any more correct.

You miss the entire point.
post #28 of 31
Melgross,

With all due respect, I recommend you consult an expert and stop digging.
post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by krispie

Melgross,

With all due respect, I recommend you consult an expert and stop digging.

Apple;'s own engineers have been saying this (uh, recommending fixing, that is) on their own forums for quite a while.

But, that's it. It's not important enough to continue arguing about.
post #30 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross

Apple;'s own engineers have been saying this (uh, recommending fixing, that is) on their own forums for quite a while.

But, that's it. It's not important enough to continue arguing about.

Do you think all Apple engineers are infallible?

I hesitate to sound like a salesman for the aforementioned MDJ, but they've frequently discussed Apple's changing and inconsistent stance on the subject, and they give sound advice.


It ain't free, but it's worth a darned site more than the 'repair permissions' mantra.

(edit for typo only)
post #31 of 31
Bwot
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