or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Software › Mac OS X › Apple's Mac OS X 10.4.8 Update nears release
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple's Mac OS X 10.4.8 Update nears release

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Users of Apple Computer's Mac OS X Tiger are soon to receive a handout from the Cupertino, Calif-based company -- a new software update to the operating system that will offer increased stability and some performance enhancements.

Under development since the summer, Mac OS X 10.4.8 Update will represent the eighth such maintenance release issued to users of Tiger since the system made its debut in late April of 2005.

While Apple has only tapped its developer community on three separate occasions to test pre-release builds of the new update, people familiar with ongoing development of the software say the latest builds are now rid of any known issues.

In its most recent distribution this week, the Mac maker posted to its developer website a 30.8MB version of the update for users of PowerPC-based Macs, labeled Mac OS X 10.4.8 build 8L2125. At the same time, it also issued a hefty 206 MB version for Intel Mac users listed as Mac OS X 10.4.8 build 8L2125.

As part of the ongoing development of Mac OS X 10.4.8, Apple has asked developers to extensively test scientific applications under the Rosetta PowerPC emulation environment for Intel machines, which is said to sport some noticeable enhancements in the area of performance.

In notes to developers accompanying previous pre-release builds, Apple was reported to have addressed issues with Image RAW, ImageIO, ColorSync, Xsan, Xsan File Manager, CoreImage and web images.

According to those familiar with the impending update, Mac OS X 10.4.8 will also introduce improvements to AFP, DVD Player, Graphics and Graphics applications, iCal, iPhoto, Mail, Microsoft Word & OpenType fonts, Modem usage, Networking, Printing, Safari, and USB.

Additionally, the release is likely to bundle support for new lines of Core 2 Duo-based MacBook and MacBook Pro notebooks, which are due for release prior to the start of the holiday shopping season in late November.
post #2 of 20
That is quite good news!!! Although, I am pretty sure that 10.4.7 already has a good amount of support for Core 2 Duos...although we can always hope for improvements.
post #3 of 20
I was told the stupid decimals bug in Indesign had been corrected thanks to Rosetta improvements in the 10.4.8… If graphics application are really performing better, I am ready to buy an iPhone to thank Apple !
Stephane

Fairy Machines to wreck havok
Reply
Stephane

Fairy Machines to wreck havok
Reply
post #4 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider

Additionally, the release is likely to bundle support for new lines of Core 2 Duo-based MacBook and MacBook Pro notebooks, which are due for release prior to the start of the holiday shopping season in late November.

Before the whining starts about the lack of a MBP Merom, I'd just like to say that with the frequent Intel updates, Apple is probably very smart to set a precedent right now that they will not just be popping in the new chips every time they're released. Because everyone knows when Intel chips are going to be released, Apple would never be able to get rid of old stock whenever an important update was released.

However, by setting the precedent that they will upgrade the Macs on their own inscrutible time table, customers will just buy a machine when they need it, saving potentially millions for Apple.
post #5 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdj21ya

However, by setting the precedent that they will upgrade the Macs on their own inscrutible time table, customers will just buy a machine when they need it, saving potentially millions for Apple.

Or costing them millions as people know a new chip is out there and just put off buying a new mac until they are released. People have always had a feel for when Apple would release new hardware (every 6-9 months) and as 9 months approached on a product, sales would stagnate (and, like with the PowerMac G5s, which at one point went some 11 months between updates, sales just died).

This is where Dell actually works better. By not building stuff beforehand, they can better manage their inventory and not have to worry about the "Well, if we release a computer with a faster chip, our current production set will need to be written off".

Also, maybe it would behoove Apple to start selling the computers with the 'older' chips as 'economy' products, rather then always making sure their so-called low-end is $1000.
post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Louzer

Or costing them millions as people know a new chip is out there and just put off buying a new mac until they are released. People have always had a feel for when Apple would release new hardware (every 6-9 months) and as 9 months approached on a product, sales would stagnate (and, like with the PowerMac G5s, which at one point went some 11 months between updates, sales just died).

This is where Dell actually works better. By not building stuff beforehand, they can better manage their inventory and not have to worry about the "Well, if we release a computer with a faster chip, our current production set will need to be written off".

Also, maybe it would behoove Apple to start selling the computers with the 'older' chips as 'economy' products, rather then always making sure their so-called low-end is $1000.

A big part of me wants to agree with you, because your explanation makes a lot of sense. Here's the counterargument (because it would be boring to just end the discussion):

Obviously having products for purchase in the store increases the likelihood that some set of consumers will purchase a Mac (there's just something about being able to take it home with you).

The second idea you propose is probably not practiced in order to avoid cannibalizing sales of full priced Macs. If you have a fixed set of consumers (certainly the set of Mac consumers is much less fluid than the set of Dell consumers--a Dell consumer probably wouldn't worry much about purchasing his next computer from HP, or vice versa), then cannibalization problems are more pronounced.

This is because Apple's differentiation gives it market power. While Dell is powerless to stop HP from selling discounted older hardware, who is going to undercut Apple in the Macintosh market? In other words, cannibalization is more of an issue to Apple, because they can actually prevent it.

While on balance I'm inclined to say that selling "economy" products would be a great idea, I think maybe part of that is just because of the fact that I as a consumer would benefit from it. Also, I would think that a smart business would do the research to try and measure which plan would be more profitable to them. Hopefully Apple has done so in this case.
post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Louzer

Also, maybe it would behoove Apple to start selling the computers with the 'older' chips as 'economy' products, rather then always making sure their so-called low-end is $1000.

Apple does this now, although in a limited and not very well promoted way. On their store check the Special Deals section, sometimes you can find older models that are still brand new and unopened. Currently you can still get the older Shuffles. And of course there are still the refurbished models listed there, too.

I don't think Apple would ever heavily market the older machines because they are selling an "experience", and selling older machines that may not support all the newest features, like back when Quartz Extreme and Core Image/Video first came out, or more recently with Front Row or Photo Booth (okay, Photo Booth isn't a real selling point, but it's fun dammit), would upset people who didn't realize they the "economy" Mac doesn't support features x and y.
post #8 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdj21ya

Before the whining starts about the lack of a MBP Merom, I'd just like to say that with the frequent Intel updates, Apple is probably very smart to set a precedent right now that they will not just be popping in the new chips every time they're released.

Because everyone knows when Intel chips are going to be released, Apple would never be able to get rid of old stock whenever an important update was released.

How do other companies do it?

Steve
post #9 of 20
Quote:
"As part of the ongoing development of Mac OS X 10.4.8, Apple has asked developers to extensively test scientific applications under the Rosetta PowerPC emulation environment for Intel machines, which is said to sport some noticeable enhancements in the area of performance."

thank god. this was the number one reason i would not buy a new intel mac were the reports of screwy number handling through emulation. this affected major math apps like spss, as well as the creative suite. i may cut programs a lot of slack (hell, i lived from '96-2003 battling Error Type 2 in Quark every stinkin' day, so my middle name is "patience"), but at a bare minimum, i expect 2+2=4... unless it's 2/x+2/x=y, where x approaches infinity, then actually, it doesn't equal 4, but, um, oh crap...
When you're lovers in a dangerous time,
You're made to feel as if your love's a crime.
Nothing worth having comes without some kind of fight.
Gotta kick at the darkness 'til it bleeds daylight.

-...
Reply
When you're lovers in a dangerous time,
You're made to feel as if your love's a crime.
Nothing worth having comes without some kind of fight.
Gotta kick at the darkness 'til it bleeds daylight.

-...
Reply
post #10 of 20
I'd say chances for a MBP update next week are pretty good.
A good brain ain't diddly if you don't have the facts
Reply
A good brain ain't diddly if you don't have the facts
Reply
post #11 of 20
It mentions a Safari update...memory leak fixes anyone???
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by rok

thank god. this was the number one reason i would not buy a new intel mac were the reports of screwy number handling through emulation. this affected major math apps like spss, as well as the creative suite. i may cut programs a lot of slack (hell, i lived from '96-2003 battling Error Type 2 in Quark every stinkin' day, so my middle name is "patience"), but at a bare minimum, i expect 2+2=4... unless it's 2/x+2/x=y, where x approaches infinity, then actually, it doesn't equal 4, but, um, oh crap...

From what I've heard, this update supposedly is just for "performance" not accuracy (though the caveat is that I heard it from people who similarly had no idea). However, if that's true, it just means that programs like SPSS will just get to the wrong answer faster than before.

I agree that it's kind of odd, what are computers made for if not mathmatical computations? How can an emulator do more complex functions if it doesn't get math right?
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephane

I was told the stupid decimals bug in Indesign had been corrected thanks to Rosetta improvements in the 10.4.8 If graphics application are really performing better, I am ready to buy an iPhone to thank Apple !

The InDesign bug is killing me. Why, oh why, is Adobe so slow in coming out with a new release? 2 years transition is just painful.
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barabas

The InDesign bug is killing me. Why, oh why, is Adobe so slow in coming out with a new release? 2 years transition is just painful.

Didn't apple just update their pro apps to universal binaries? It took them that long for a few tweaks and recompile? Didn't Steve Jobs say they have been building Intel version of OS X for 5 years prior to the Intel transition? So the apple pro app guys couldn't have had any problem planning for the transition.
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by pt123

Didn't apple just update their pro apps to universal binaries? It took them that long for a few tweaks and recompile? Didn't Steve Jobs say they have been building Intel version of OS X for 5 years prior to the Intel transition? So the apple pro app guys couldn't have had any problem planning for the transition.

Adobe's developers might not be using xcode tools. I know the Microsoft Mac business unit just finished converting their Office source code over to xcode. So getting to Universal Binary can be a little more than just re-compiling.

Steve
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by demenas

Adobe's developers might not be using xcode tools. I know the Microsoft Mac business unit just finished converting their Office source code over to xcode. So getting to Universal Binary can be a little more than just re-compiling.

Steve

You're absolutely right. Adobe has been using the CodeWarrior IDE. They first have to move everything over to Xcode and then start parsing that code for things that work and don't work. Then they have to fix the things that don't work. I hardly think that CS3 will include many new features because of the work being put into the Xcode/Universal binary transition. Simply put...
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flounder

I'd say chances for a MBP update next week are pretty good.

And how many times have we heard this before. im not having a go at you, im just making the point that these kind of statements get made every week. i remember this statement being made at the begining of august.
"i find that if you keep talkin', your mouth comes up with stuff..." Karl Pilkington
Reply
"i find that if you keep talkin', your mouth comes up with stuff..." Karl Pilkington
Reply
post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbaynham

And how many times have we heard this before. im not having a go at you, im just making the point that these kind of statements get made every week. i remember this statement being made at the begining of august.

Well, I didn't think an update was likely then

The combination of this update apparently being ready to go, a whole slew of minor pro-app updates, plus it looks like competitors are actually starting to get merom notebooks into the hands of customers very soon (if not now) all make me believe they'll be appearing in MBPs very shortly.
A good brain ain't diddly if you don't have the facts
Reply
A good brain ain't diddly if you don't have the facts
Reply
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flounder

Well, I didn't think an update was likely then

The combination of this update apparently being ready to go, a whole slew of minor pro-app updates, plus it looks like competitors are actually starting to get merom notebooks into the hands of customers very soon (if not now) all make me believe they'll be appearing in MBPs very shortly.

yeah i wasnt having a go, i was just saying...
"i find that if you keep talkin', your mouth comes up with stuff..." Karl Pilkington
Reply
"i find that if you keep talkin', your mouth comes up with stuff..." Karl Pilkington
Reply
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barabas

The InDesign bug is killing me. Why, oh why, is Adobe so slow in coming out with a new release? 2 years transition is just painful.

There are usually 18 months between Adobe releases and it seems to be the case this time too.
JLL

95% percent of the boat is owned by Microsoft, but the 5% Apple controls happens to be the rudder!
Reply
JLL

95% percent of the boat is owned by Microsoft, but the 5% Apple controls happens to be the rudder!
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Mac OS X
AppleInsider › Forums › Software › Mac OS X › Apple's Mac OS X 10.4.8 Update nears release