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Apple suspect in Internet device market survey

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Apple Computer is one of few high-tech companies which may have been responsible for a recent market survey that asked participants to rate their preference of form factor designs for a next-generation Internet handheld device.

The study, conducted earlier this spring by a private firm, placed approximately ten mock portable devices of different overall size, shape, screen size and weight, in front of participants and asked that they rate those devices based on which offered the most appealing structural design.

According to one participant, the mock devices consisted mainly of hollow casing enclosures. Behind the mock display area on each device was a printed image of a Yahoo! website displayed in Apple's Safari web browser.

After having the opportunity to handle the devices, the participant was asked in a survey to indicate which features and form factors were most desirable. A broad range of feature possibilities were presented, including RSS access, full Internet access versus partial Internet access, Internet access via hot spots versus Internet anywhere, cell phone capabilities, as well as MP3, movie and television content access.

The survey also asked whether the participant preferred the device be optimized for automobile integration rather than the Internet access. One example described a car device with a built in FM transmitter and GPS capabilities. Another asked if the participant would prefer subscribing in advance to an associated service agreement for $50 per month in order to save $200 off the cost of the device or pay two years in advance to save $400. Pricing preferences for the various devices were listed between $200 - $900.

While there is little concrete evidence to suggest Apple was responsible for commissioning the survey, information to rule out the Cupertino, Calif.-based iPod maker is also lacking.

Interestingly, in the months following the survey, the participant matched two of the devices from the study to illustrations that appeared in a September Apple patent filing entitled, "Hand held electronic device with multiple touch sensing devices."

The illustrations, figures 1E and 1F (displayed below), depict iPod-like devices with slightly larger display areas and a series of input buttons. One of the devices appears to sport a tiny trackpad, flanked by two sets of control keys.



In the abstract to the patent filing, Apple said the "the touch sensing devices may for example be selected from touch panels, touch screens or touch sensitive housings." Meanwhile, in specific references to the figures mentioned above, the company said figure 1E includes "a camera" and figure 1F "a GPS module."

"The camera 10E typically includes a display 12 such as a graphic display and input devices 14 such as buttons," the description continues. "The GPS module 10F typically includes a display 12 such as graphic display and input devices 14 such as buttons, and in some cases a navigation pad."

While Apple has yet to broaden its consumer electronics scope beyond the iPod digital music player, the company last month revealed plans to begin selling a $299 set-top-box dubbed iTV during the first calendar quarter of 2007. Shortly thereafter, it's expected to introduce an iPod cell phone.

It's unclear how far Apple will immediately extend its foray into the consumer electronics market. However, Intel officials in a series of recent interviews have implied that the chipmaker is working closely with Apple on a series of "next-generation technologies."
post #2 of 15
Interesting, but there's really nothing new in this space.

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

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post #3 of 15
Holy crap! Performing a test on a small, focused group of individuals to determine user likes/dislikes of a product? You've got to be kidding me? Apple is now so far ahead of the curve of everyone else! I wonder how long before all those other companies in the world decide to take this idea and use it for their own petulent ideas!
post #4 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich

Interesting, but there's really nothing new in this space.

I believe the above was also touted widely regarding the MP3 player market just prior to the iPod.
My brain is hung like a HORSE!
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My brain is hung like a HORSE!
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post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kickaha

I believe the above was also touted widely regarding the MP3 player market just prior to the iPod.

About that artice: Holy flanjolie!!

Please elaborate on your comment?
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #6 of 15
All I have to say is refer to my earlier AI post on my bets for Steve's true plan re iPhone here: http://forums.appleinsider.com/showt...539#post965539
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland

About that artice: Holy flanjolie!!

Please elaborate on your comment?

And I have a reply to your reply---- Holy Angelina Jolie...Pitt!

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GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

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post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich

And I have a reply to your reply---- Holy Angelina Jolie...Pitt!

/smirks
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland

About that artice: Holy flanjolie!!

Please elaborate on your comment?

Many people, on hearing that Apple was rumored to go into the MP3 player market, stated that "Why? There's nothing new to bring to the market, it'll be Just Another MP3 Player. That's just silly."

Well...
My brain is hung like a HORSE!
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My brain is hung like a HORSE!
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post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kickaha

Many people, on hearing that Apple was rumored to go into the MP3 player market, stated that "Why? There's nothing new to bring to the market, it'll be Just Another MP3 Player. That's just silly."

Well...

Even without the iPod existing at all, nobody with any sense could say that statement when referring to the cell phone. Most cell phones are a joke, my RAZR sucks.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #11 of 15
Mmm, I'm doubting that this is Apple here.

RSS reader? FM transmitter? Sounds too swiss-army for Apple. Plus isn't SJ the only focus group Apple ever uses?
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by geofftrapp

All I have to say is refer to my earlier AI post on my bets for Steve's true plan re iPhone here: http://forums.appleinsider.com/showt...539#post965539

The concept isn't new. This is precisely what UMA is, and it looks like it will be widely available before Christmas. T-Mobile USA has run trials and will be releasing it within the next month or so - $5 a month will buy you unlimited airtime when you're within range of an 802.11 hub, and you'll get the usual package of bundled minutes and unlimited nights/weekends/same-network outside of that. Orange has already announced the service in France, with BT in the UK running trials for quite a while now.

Can Apple pull it off in a way T-Mobile can't? Not even remotely. Apple doesn't own a cellphone carrier. For a truly seamless technology that "just works" you need to be in control of a sizable portion of the entire system. If the phone can't switch seamlessly between cellular and your local network, then it's not going to feel right. If it can't take advantage of random WAPs around the country, then it's half-arsed. People want a phone that requires the minimum of confusion, and something that uses one person's network at some point, and another's at another point, isn't going to be that thing that "just works".

So if Apple were to try to take over telecommunications in this way, it'd be a screw up. They'd be entering with a "convergence" product when everyone else is. They'd either be going their way, in which case their technology would be worse than their rivals, or they'd be standardizing on UMA... in which case they're just another "Me too" phone maker.

Which then brings us back to the old "Maybe they're doing it so they can produce an iTunes phone because I want one!" argument, which I've talked about before so I'll avoid boring you all again... ;-)

Personally, I'd like Apple to take baby steps and produce their own version of the Nokia 770, which is a far more interesting device than any "convergence" device or iPod phone people generally keep coming up with. This is an 802.11 mini-tablet, which is the kind of thing Apple could make work really well in a way Nokia never will. Over time, something like that might be the kind of thing people would want a cellphone with UMA built-in to. But you'd have to get people used to the concept first.
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by geofftrapp

All I have to say is refer to my earlier AI post on my bets for Steve's true plan re iPhone here: http://forums.appleinsider.com/showt...539#post965539

Like this?



http://www.engadget.com/2006/09/09/t...street-review/
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45 2a3 300b 211 845 833
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post #14 of 15
To add to the article, I recently participated in a survey about cable company providers.

Along with known phone and cable companies, an Apple-branded "service" was touted where I could choose which channels and movie packages I would be willing to purchase at various tier pricing and quality (low-res vs hi-res).

All I could think is, if Apple truly wants to run a wire into my house or beam a signal in my general direction, would I want to subscribe? If the experience resembled that which I've had with Apple in other areas of my life, the answer is yes!
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider

Apple Computer is one of few high-tech companies which may have been responsible for a recent market survey that asked participants to rate their preference of form factor designs for a next-generation Internet handheld device.

The study, conducted earlier this spring by a private firm, placed approximately ten mock portable devices of different overall size, shape, screen size and weight, in front of participants and asked that they rate those devices based on which offered the most appealing structural design.

According to one participant, the mock devices consisted mainly of hollow casing enclosures. Behind the mock display area on each device was a printed image of a Yahoo! website displayed in Apple's Safari web browser.

After having the opportunity to handle the devices, the participant was asked in a survey to indicate which features and form factors were most desirable. A broad range of feature possibilities were presented, including RSS access, full Internet access versus partial Internet access, Internet access via hot spots versus Internet anywhere, cell phone capabilities, as well as MP3, movie and television content access.

The survey also asked whether the participant preferred the device be optimized for automobile integration rather than the Internet access. One example described a car device with a built in FM transmitter and GPS capabilities. Another asked if the participant would prefer subscribing in advance to an associated service agreement for $50 per month in order to save $200 off the cost of the device or pay two years in advance to save $400. Pricing preferences for the various devices were listed between $200 - $900.

While there is little concrete evidence to suggest Apple was responsible for commissioning the survey, information to rule out the Cupertino, Calif.-based iPod maker is also lacking.

Interestingly, in the months following the survey, the participant matched two of the devices from the study to illustrations that appeared in a September Apple patent filing entitled, "Hand held electronic device with multiple touch sensing devices."

The illustrations, figures 1E and 1F (displayed below), depict iPod-like devices with slightly larger display areas and a series of input buttons. One of the devices appears to sport a tiny trackpad, flanked by two sets of control keys.



In the abstract to the patent filing, Apple said the "the touch sensing devices may for example be selected from touch panels, touch screens or touch sensitive housings." Meanwhile, in specific references to the figures mentioned above, the company said figure 1E includes "a camera" and figure 1F "a GPS module."

"The camera 10E typically includes a display 12 such as a graphic display and input devices 14 such as buttons," the description continues. "The GPS module 10F typically includes a display 12 such as graphic display and input devices 14 such as buttons, and in some cases a navigation pad."

While Apple has yet to broaden its consumer electronics scope beyond the iPod digital music player, the company last month revealed plans to begin selling a $299 set-top-box dubbed iTV during the first calendar quarter of 2007. Shortly thereafter, it's expected to introduce an iPod cell phone.

It's unclear how far Apple will immediately extend its foray into the consumer electronics market. However, Intel officials in a series of recent interviews have implied that the chipmaker is working closely with Apple on a series of "next-generation technologies."

Maybe it was not apple but Microsloth looking for Zoon Ideas. God knows they need all the user interface help they can get.
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