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Apple seeds Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard build 9A283

post #1 of 74
Thread Starter 
Apple Computer this week released to developers the first pre-release update of its next-generation Leopard operating system since the initial preview in early August.

According to a post on MacRumors, the Cupertino, Calif.-based company on Thursday made available its Select and Premier Apple Developer Connection members Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard build 9A283.

The latest offering is believed to be just the third external build of Leopard, including a subtle Software Update-based revision in September that brought Leopard Preview to build 9A241e from build 9A241.

Build 9A283 delivers "Significant user interface changes to iCal" and "Basic editing in Preview," according to the report. It also adds "new Parental Controls [...] for content filtering, apps, and curfews" and "3D audio cues to indicate locations of items on the screen in the VoiceOver screen reader."

Meanwhile, a separate posting adds that the latest build delivers live*previews*in*the*print*panel, Spotlight Preview streaming in iChat Theater mode, and Quick Look Spotlight support for*PDF, HTML, Web Archives, Text, QuickTime movies*and*sound.

Several known issues reportedly remain with the latest builds of Leopard, which is due for release during the first half of 2007.
post #2 of 74
woo woo...
post #3 of 74
I can't wait to see the changes to iCal. Man, that program has sucked for years.

I hope Apple has tons and tons for us in Leopard. Tiger has been pretty sad...
post #4 of 74
Eventually apple is going to put coverflow inside of the finder, and several other views similar to iTunes, including livefolder icon updates for folders with pictures. Also it's going to have the complete path similar to the itunes music store. And have a new look and feel...
post #5 of 74
Webmail- this is exactly what I have envisioned for the Finder as well. The other thing I would like to do is add my own columns of information.
post #6 of 74
My guess is that you will be able to edit all "user friendly" Spotlight data inside the Finder, as well as being able to add new "keys" (like 'movie genre' or 'projectname').

Also, another guess is that they will be using Core Animation for stuff like "stack files by movie genre".

Yet another guess is they will add another view in Finder: the spider web view. In this view all files are somehow placed in an abstract spider web, each file connected by a line, a black line indicating a strong relationship, and a light grey a weak one. This way you'll be able to browse 'by connection', whatever your connection priorities at that time may be. E.g:

- You type in 'vacation 2006'
- A spider web opens with a nice core Animation tween, containing the following items:
[centre point of web labeled: vacation 2006]
'photos'
'music'
'movies'
'applications'
...because these are the only type of files containing 'vacation 2006',
with applications having a grey line, and photos a black line. (drawn from center point).
- Then you click 'photos'
- The spider web tweens to:
[centre point of web labeled: 'photos of vacation 2006']
'august 2006'
'november 2006'
and some weaker alternative ones:
'me swimming in France'
'best rated photos of vacation 2006'

So basically you end up with a file or folder you can manipulate just like in another Finder view.
Now lets say you end up with 'me swimming in France'. Right clicking gives you the option:
'Find by 'me swimming in France'
Then, the spider web re-opens, with this new criteria.

Gee. I am rambling! sorry.
post #7 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by BWhaler

I can't wait to see the changes to iCal. Man, that program has sucked for years.

I hope Apple has tons and tons for us in Leopard. Tiger has been pretty sad...

Apparently they've 'iTunes 7d' the interface, which is sad. I like drawers. The interface wasn't the problem. What it needed was calendar sharing, and that was about all.
post #8 of 74
That's some pretty ho hum stuff there. I hope they are working on something that is actually interesting. Better metadata support, FTFF, etc.
post #9 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by webmail

Eventually apple is going to put coverflow inside of the finder, and several other views similar to iTunes, including livefolder icon updates for folders with pictures. Also it's going to have the complete path similar to the itunes music store. And have a new look and feel...

Coverflow also seems like a natural fit for iPhoto '07, which will most likely come out at MWSF in January.
post #10 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by webmail

Eventually apple is going to put coverflow inside of the finder


...highly doubtful for reasons I care not to share.
post #11 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by aegisdesign

Apparently they've 'iTunes 7d' the interface, which is sad. I like drawers. The interface wasn't the problem. What it needed was calendar sharing, and that was about all.

I am most interesting in seeing iCal get out-of-the box integration with Exchange. Using IMAP in Mail is already very good, but Calendar and Address Book don't integrate well with Exchange; that's one of the big hurdles to using my Mac at work.
post #12 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Porchland

I am most interesting in seeing iCal get out-of-the box integration with Exchange. Using IMAP in Mail is already very good, but Calendar and Address Book don't integrate well with Exchange; that's one of the big hurdles to using my Mac at work.

Highly unlikely. iCal in Leopard shares it's calendars via CalDAV running on an OSX Server. Unless Exchange implements CalDAV too, which is possible as it's an open standard, but unlikely since it's Microsoft, there's no sharing.

http://www.apple.com/server/macosx/l...calserver.html
post #13 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daffy_Duck

That's some pretty ho hum stuff there. I hope they are working on something that is actually interesting. Better metadata support, FTFF, etc.

Those structural improvements are rarely announced for these build update watch lists.
post #14 of 74
I would like to see the Finder become a single window app that can easily go full screen.
A single window with multiple panes would make for a much simpler file manager.

I hate drawers.
I'm looking forward to seeing iCal's new interface.
I also hope .Mac has a webCal interface that looks and functions the same.
post #15 of 74
What I would like to see is in the Save File dialogs the option to include Spotlight keywords and to select a label color. So it becomes a 1-step process instead of a 2 to 3-step process.
post #16 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny Mozzarella

I would like to see the Finder become a single window app that can easily go full screen.
A single window with multiple panes would make for a much simpler file manager.

Wow, that's like back to XTree on DOS. How about making it green text on black too?
post #17 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider

the latest build delivers live*previews*in*the*print*panel, Spotlight Preview streaming in iChat Theater mode, and Quick Look Spotlight support for*PDF, HTML, Web Archives, Text, QuickTime movies*and*sound.


Judging from some asterisks, it also apparently delivered that post.
post #18 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregmightdothat

Judging from some asterisks, it also apparently delivered that post.

Ichat theater mode? I can't find crap about it, and I'm a developer. I launch ichat. video conference.. try sharing a video through quicktime, can't do any theater mode or any of that stupid video background stuff steve showed.

I don't know where people are finding these features...
post #19 of 74
There's not much to Leopard, on the surface at least. It should be a free upgrade, or at least half price.

And what's up with the Garbage Collection being added to Cocoa? Makes you ashamed to be a Mac developer.
post #20 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii

And what's up with the Garbage Collection being added to Cocoa? Makes you ashamed to be a Mac developer.

It's optional.
post #21 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii

There's not much to Leopard, on the surface at least. It should be a free upgrade, or at least half price.

And what's up with the Garbage Collection being added to Cocoa? Makes you ashamed to be a Mac developer.

I know real developers use assembly because using higher levels of abstraction that make you more productive as a dev just isn't the mac way.
"Slow vehicle speeds with frequent stops would signal traffic congestion, for instance."

uh... it could also signal that my Mom is at the wheel...
Reply
"Slow vehicle speeds with frequent stops would signal traffic congestion, for instance."

uh... it could also signal that my Mom is at the wheel...
Reply
post #22 of 74
Garbage collection is an upgrade to Objective-C. Ask John about the importance of it. I would like to know what algorithm they chose.
--Johnny
Reply
--Johnny
Reply
post #23 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chucker

It's optional.

Doesn't matter to me that it's optional. In my view Apple made all the GC-using languages look stupid when they achieved 99% of the benefit with just a few conventions. It was an example of cleverly subverting the herd, which was cool. Now they are just following it.
post #24 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii

Doesn't matter to me that it's optional. In my view Apple made all the GC-using languages look stupid when they achieved 99% of the benefit with just a few conventions. It was an example of cleverly subverting the herd, which was cool. Now they are just following it.

The first high level languages in the 50s had garbage collection. Not having it was just an aberration. Programmers shouldn't have to worry about it.
post #25 of 74
How do you tell what build you're running? I'm running Tiger BTW.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #26 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland

How do you tell what build you're running? I'm running Tiger BTW.

Apple Menu -> About this Mac

Click on the version number and it cycles through 'Version 10.4.8', 'Build 8L127' and your computer's serial number.
post #27 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by aegisdesign

Apple Menu -> About this Mac

Click on the version number and it cycles through 'Version 10.4.8', 'Build 8L127' and your computer's serial number.

Oh shit yeah I forgot about that, thanks.
(I must install that other cat on my desk now, and do that)
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #28 of 74
Here is a screenshot of the new iCal...
I don't know if I should or shouldn't post it....

Delete this post if I violate your TOS.

Moderator note: yeah, we can't allow that. Sorry.
Skylor M. Werden
skylor at gmail dot com
Reply
Skylor M. Werden
skylor at gmail dot com
Reply
post #29 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylor

Here is a screenshot of the new iCal...
I don't know if I should or shouldn't post it....

Delete this post if I violate your TOS.

Wow it's so different, NOT.
It's slightly different. The brush metal is gone, great.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #30 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland

Wow it's so different, NOT.

I hate the damn drawer.
I wish they would get rid of it.
Skylor M. Werden
skylor at gmail dot com
Reply
Skylor M. Werden
skylor at gmail dot com
Reply
post #31 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylor

Here is a screenshot of the new iCal...

It's like when you shine a really bright light on something and it looks all washed out. I hope it's not the final iteration.
post #32 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii

There's not much to Leopard, on the surface at least. It should be a free upgrade, or at least half price.

And what's up with the Garbage Collection being added to Cocoa? Makes you ashamed to be a Mac developer.

Not all Cocoa programs are high performance apps. Anything that brings more programmers into Cocoa or improves the (memory) performance of others is pretty much a good thing.

I still probably won't touch it, but a lot of people wouldn't even think about Cocoa because they've only ever used Java and C/C++ and assumed that Cocoa was closer to the latter.
post #33 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii

There's not much to Leopard, on the surface at least. It should be a free upgrade, or at least half price.

And what's up with the Garbage Collection being added to Cocoa? Makes you ashamed to be a Mac developer.

Is this a serious post, or a joke?
post #34 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii

Doesn't matter to me that it's optional. In my view Apple made all the GC-using languages look stupid when they achieved 99% of the benefit with just a few conventions. It was an example of cleverly subverting the herd, which was cool. Now they are just following it.

I should have read down further before posting. You are serious.

Garbage collection is considered to be a significent boost to productivity for programmers, and to the reliability of the developed programs. Perhaps Apple should have added this earlier.

I can't understand why you seem to be against it.
post #35 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross

I should have read down further before posting. You are serious.

Garbage collection is considered to be a significent boost to productivity for programmers, and to the reliability of the developed programs. Perhaps Apple should have added this earlier.

I can't understand why you seem to be against it.

A question of purism. Lack of garbage collection enforces higher-quality, higher-performance code. On the other hand, availability of garbage collection encourages many more developers to write code at all.

Realistically, having GC is better. Period.
post #36 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chucker

A question of purism. Lack of garbage collection enforces higher-quality, higher-performance code. On the other hand, availability of garbage collection encourages many more developers to write code at all.

Realistically, having GC is better. Period.

I understand the "purisn arument. The problem is that not all programmers are willing to do the due dilligence that is required when doing it manually. That's been one of the reasons why it was developed in the first place.

I would rather have reliable code, than code that is marginally faster, but crashes more often.
post #37 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylor

Here is a screenshot of the new iCal...
I don't know if I should or shouldn't post it....

Delete this post if I violate your TOS.

Euww. Pale blue panes with borders that are too small to hit AND a drawer. Keep the drawer, get rid of the pale blue. I'd already forgot about metal as I've not seen metal in a year or so - I run Uno.
post #38 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross

I should have read down further before posting. You are serious.

Garbage collection is considered to be a significent boost to productivity for programmers, and to the reliability of the developed programs. Perhaps Apple should have added this earlier.

I can't understand why you seem to be against it.

I think Cocoa's current solution of using autorelease and tying it in with the application event loop was a stroke of genius. Imagine the kind of mental leap someone had to make to bring the event loop in to a discussion of memory management. On the face they seem totally unrelated, and yet in hindsight it is perfect.

Autorelease is a good middle ground between completely manual reference counting and completely automatic memory management, with it's wasteful walking through thousands of pointers to find unreferenced objects. IMO, they already have the best solution out there, and they (not me) are the ones being purist by going to a fully automatic model.
post #39 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii

I think Cocoa's current solution of using autorelease and tying it in with the application event loop was a stroke of genius. Imagine the kind of mental leap someone had to make to bring the event loop in to a discussion of memory management. On the face they seem totally unrelated, and yet in hindsight it is perfect.

Autorelease is a good middle ground between completely manual reference counting and completely automatic memory management, with it's wasteful walking through thousands of pointers to find unreferenced objects. IMO, they already have the best solution out there, and they (not me) are the ones being purist by going to a fully automatic model.

I agree with Chucker's: "It's optional."

As I mentioned in an earlier post, not all programmers will be interested in cleaning up. This gives them a better choice.
post #40 of 74
What's interesting is that in almost all cases* GC will be faster than Cocoa's retain/release method. I agree that retain/release is about as good as it gets regarding manual memory management, but there is a lot of messaging overhead with that method. When the AutoReleasePool is released, it in turn sends a release message to all the objects it contains. This can add up to a lot of messages depending on the situation. Now with something like a mark and sweep implemented in the runtime, automatic memory management can actually be faster.
"Slow vehicle speeds with frequent stops would signal traffic congestion, for instance."

uh... it could also signal that my Mom is at the wheel...
Reply
"Slow vehicle speeds with frequent stops would signal traffic congestion, for instance."

uh... it could also signal that my Mom is at the wheel...
Reply
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