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Mac OS X Leopard to sport next-gen DVD Player software - Page 3

post #81 of 91
That makes sense. It's probably apparent that I don't use the services menu or many of Apple's stock apps.
post #82 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjk View Post

For me that's an overspecialized waste of a decent general purpose computer. I'd prefer using Apple TV, though so far its specs are disappointing and seem unnecessarily crippled as an unappreciated ploy to promote Apple Store sales while severing itself from legacy content (and SDTV).

The nice thing if the OSX DVD player is improved on the mini with better deinterlacing and scaling is that if I do have a lot of 480 content I can upscale to HD without needing an upscaling DVD drive. The Mini is also smaller at the price of no 802.11N. For that you'd have to buy a bridge. Someone someday has to explain to me why the 4 port Buffalo Airstation Wireless Bridges are $60 but single port "Game Adapters" are $80.

Vinea
post #83 of 91
Being in Europe, what would really make the difference for me is something like WinDVD's TruSpeed (that plays 25 fps at 24 fps). I can't understand why I still have to watch sped up movies in 2007, with all the technology at hand. But I guess that will never happen and I'll just have to wait for BD or HDDVD to become a standard.

(And has anybody commented on how annoying it is that DVD Player won't respond to cmd+F for fullscreen toggling like QuickTime, iTunes or VLC).
post #84 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksec View Post

Could some longtime Mac user tell me, why has apple decided to have DVD player on its own and not just use Quicktime player instead for all media?

I think nobody gave the correct answer. It is purely legal issue. DVD player needs to implement a number of restrictions, like disabling screen capture etc. Apple did not want to keep wit the restrictions in QuickTime player or any other app. Note that QTKit could be used in any application but DVD playback - not!
post #85 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by instantations View Post

Being in Europe, what would really make the difference for me is something like WinDVD's TruSpeed (that plays 25 fps at 24 fps). I can't understand why I still have to watch sped up movies in 2007, with all the technology at hand. But I guess that will never happen and I'll just have to wait for BD or HDDVD to become a standard.

(And has anybody commented on how annoying it is that DVD Player won't respond to cmd+F for fullscreen toggling like QuickTime, iTunes or VLC).

What do you mean by sped up movies? I've never experienced this.


What I find annoying is QT doesn't respond to double-clicking of the video window the way I naturally expect it to. With VLC, DVD Player and many other players the video will do full full screen upon a double-click, QT will merely pause/start the video.
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post #86 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

What do you mean by sped up movies? I've never experienced this.

If you've ever watched a PAL DVD on a television, then you have.

Films are shot at 24 fps

PAL is 25 fps

Rather than convert the 24 fps source material into a 25 fps file, PAL dvds simply play back the file at 1.041666666 x real-time.

Whilst this is necessary for older PAL displays that will only display at 25 fps, modern displays such as LCD, DLP, plasma etc don't inherently have this limitation, but for some reason, they still have the limitation artificially applied. It would be nice if DVD players had a 24 fps output mode, and modern displays a 24 fps input mode, so that we europeans can watch the film un-altered.

It would also be nice if Apple implemented a 24 fps play-back mode in the DVD player application.
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post #87 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post

It would be nice if DVD players had a 24 fps output mode, and modern displays a 24 fps input mode, so that we europeans can watch the film un-altered.

Except that many PAL movies are pitch shifted so the sound isn't 4% too high. When you play those back at 24fps won't you get voices and music that are too low in pitch?
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post #88 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by shadow View Post

I think nobody gave the correct answer. It is purely legal issue. DVD player needs to implement a number of restrictions, like disabling screen capture etc.

Apple seems to be more restrictive on this, probably more than they have to be. I think most players disable screen capture only if the DVD video segment is Macrovision encoded, Apple seems to prevent it period.
post #89 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

Apple seems to be more restrictive on this, probably more than they have to be. I think most players disable screen capture only if the DVD video segment is Macrovision encoded, Apple seems to prevent it period.

There is a big difference between what the people working on these small projects can do, and what Apple, as a major company in this business can do.

The writers of VLC and MPlayer have already been taken to court for using codecs they are not entitled to. They also allow their programs to get around other legal restrictions. Apple can't do this. Apple takes the simplest solution that keeps them within the licensing requirements. They can't be seen as a pirating company as the people from these small projects seem to delight in.
post #90 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

There is a big difference between what the people working on these small projects can do, and what Apple, as a major company in this business can do.

The writers of VLC and MPlayer have already been taken to court for using codecs they are not entitled to. They also allow their programs to get around other legal restrictions. Apple can't do this. Apple takes the simplest solution that keeps them within the licensing requirements. They can't be seen as a pirating company as the people from these small projects seem to delight in.

I'm comparing Apple's DVD player against commercial software such as WinDVD. I did not have open source or lone-developer software in mind. For example, WinDVD does allow single frame screen grabs, but only if the Macrovision flag is off. It's kind of a dumb restriction, but that's what I expect of the the demands placed by the likes of the **AA groups.
post #91 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I'm comparing Apple's DVD player against commercial software such as WinDVD. I did not have open source or lone-developer software in mind. For example, WinDVD does allow single frame screen grabs, but only if the Macrovision flag is off. It's kind of a dumb restriction, but that's what I expect of the the demands placed by the likes of the **AA groups.

I was taking the reply of Solipsism's, where he did use that as an example.
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