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AirPort: AirPort Utility 1.0, 802.11n manuals, Core Duo Extreme fix

post #1 of 81
Thread Starter 
Apple has released a pair of manuals for its forthcoming 802.11n AirPort Extreme Base Station revealing the new AirPort Utility software interface. Meanwhile, the company has also issued an AirPort Extreme update for Core Duo Macs.

AirPort Extreme 802.11n manuals

Ahead of availability of its new 802.11n wireless base station, Apple has posted to its website an "AirPort Extreme (802.11n) Setup Guide" (515KB PDF) and a manual on "Designing AirPort Extreme 802.11n Networks" (1.8MB PDF).

When the AirPort Extreme 802.11n wireless base station begins shipping next month, it will include a new application dubbed AirPort Utility that will replace existing versions of both AirPort Setup Assistant and AirPort Admin Utility.

AirPort Utility will be backwards compatible with Apple's previous generation AirPort Extreme and Express base stations. It will also add new features, such as the ability to monitor all connected clients on the AirPort wireless network -- an essential tool for businesses, schools, and other large wireless environments.

When configuring the new Extreme base station, users can select between "802.11n (802.11b/g compatible)" or "802.11n only (2.4 GHz)" from the software's Radio Mode pop-up menu. Each
client computer will connect to the network and transmit network traffic at its highest speed. (Some screenshots of the new application interface are included below.)

According Apple's official specification list, the new Extreme base station produces radio output power of 20 dBm, up from 15 dBm on previous models. This indicates that users will see a noticeable increase in the range of their wireless networks as the device is indeed putting out a stronger signal.

AirPort Extreme Update 2007-001

Meanwhile, Apple yesterday evening released "AirPort Extreme Update 2007-001" (6.5MB), which is recommended for all Intel-based Macintosh computers and provides compatibility with AirPort Extreme base stations and networks.

Specifically, Apple said the update patches a vulnerability where attackers on the wireless network could cause system crashes on Core Duo version of the Mac mini, MacBook, and MacBook Pro. Other systems, including the Core 2 Duo versions are not affected.

"An out-of-bounds memory read may occur while handling wireless frames," the company said. "An attacker in local proximity may be able to trigger a system crash by sending a maliciously-crafted frame to an affected system.

AirPort Extreme Update 2007-001 addresses the issue by performing additional validation of wireless frames, Apple added.

AirPort Utility 1.0 screenshots











post #2 of 81
mmm pretty pictures...
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post #3 of 81
looks like fun
post #4 of 81
love the configuration.

hate the 10/100 ports. bah humbuggery. gimme gigabit.
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post #5 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by sandau View Post

love the configuration.

hate the 10/100 ports. bah humbuggery. gimme gigabit.

I'm by no means a network engineer, but other than moving files around within your home network, why would one need gigibit?

In my case, I have DSL. The speed of the dsl is no where near gigabit, so what would 1000/base T ports gain me? If nothing can enter or leave the network any faster than the speed of my dsl I don't see this as an issue.

I'm hoping that since the documents are going up on their website and that earlier rumor of the new base's shipping this month, that mine will be here soon.
post #6 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomkarl View Post

I'm by no means a network engineer, but other than moving files around within your home network, why would one need gigibit?

That's precisely it.
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post #7 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ringo View Post

That's precisely it.

absolutely it. i'm pushing 20gb files around, 10/100 is pathetic. 1000 is the key.
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post #8 of 81
True, gigabit would be nice. But seriously, if you're setting up a network where you're pushing around 20GB of files over ethernet, this isn't the router you're going to buy anyway.

If you want to use time machine to backup your laptop wirelessly to the USB hard drive attatched to the router, this one's for you.

I do wish it had 2 USB ports though. I'd like to have my printer and an external drive on it... and I doubt a hub is going to work well, but it might. I wonder if Apple will make a matching USB hard drive so it can "stack?"
post #9 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomkarl View Post

I'm by no means a network engineer, but other than moving files around within your home network, why would one need gigibit?

I'm sure it would make streaming content from your computer to your Apple TV a lot more reliable. That was my first thought when both were introduced at MacWorld.
post #10 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by sandau View Post

absolutely it. i'm pushing 20gb files around, 10/100 is pathetic. 1000 is the key.

While i'm personally disappointed that Apple decided NOT to go with gigabit ethernet (after all, all my macs have it built in), i use firewire to push big files around the network. It's not a dealbreaker for me, but i'm hoping for a revision 2 box that will address this. It always strikes me as odd when Apple does these seemingly half-measured things. I'm certainly happy to have more than one ethernet ports on the new airport. i'm also curious if we are gonna see a 'power over ethernet' version of it.
post #11 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoonShadow View Post

I do wish it had 2 USB ports though. I'd like to have my printer and an external drive on it... and I doubt a hub is going to work well, but it might. I wonder if Apple will make a matching USB hard drive so it can "stack?"

A hub should work fine. In my experience USB 2 has been much more reliable that USB 1.1, especially when hubs are involved. Even if it did have two ports, there's no way Apple would put two separate USB busses in a low-margin product. It would be nice if only to save the cost of the hub.
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post #12 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by iBrad View Post

I'm sure it would make streaming content from your computer to your Apple TV a lot more reliable. That was my first thought when both were introduced at MacWorld.

eh? Gigabit/Megabit doesn't have anything to do with a wireless connection to AppleTV.
post #13 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomkarl View Post

In my case, I have DSL. The speed of the dsl is no where near gigabit, so what would 1000/base T ports gain me? If nothing can enter or leave the network any faster than the speed of my dsl I don't see this as an issue.

In that case, we wouldn't need 802.11n speed either, would we? 802.11g can handle current broadband speed just fine. The "but my DSL can't keep up" argument applies to the wireless side too.

If I upgrade my current 11g access point to 11n, I want faster Ethernet speed too. If wired speed is slower than wireless speed, then it might as well forgo the Ethernet ports.
post #14 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoonShadow View Post

True, gigabit would be nice. But seriously, if you're setting up a network where you're pushing around 20GB of files over ethernet, this isn't the router you're going to buy anyway.

If you want to use time machine to backup your laptop wirelessly to the USB hard drive attatched to the router, this one's for you.

I do wish it had 2 USB ports though. I'd like to have my printer and an external drive on it... and I doubt a hub is going to work well, but it might. I wonder if Apple will make a matching USB hard drive so it can "stack?"

Your right. This isn't the router I am going to buy. It will be a linksys because they have gigabit ports.

At home I push 5 - 25 GB across my network everynight at 2 and 5 am. System backups to a ethernet HDD SATA will be the next big thing with Apple's big backup program coming out with Leopard.

Let's all get a grip on reality and admit Apple screwed up on this one. It should have been gigabit. Especially for the price they want.
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post #15 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by aplnub View Post

Your right. This isn't the router I am going to buy. It will be a linksys because they have gigabit ports.

At home I push 5 - 25 GB across my network everynight at 2 and 5 am. System backups to a ethernet HDD SATA will be the next big thing with Apple's big backup program coming out with Leopard.

Let's all get a grip on reality and admit Apple screwed up on this one. It should have been gigabit. Especially for the price they want.

Oh, haven't you guessed it by now? It has gigabit Ethernet hardware inside... You'll just have to buy a firmware update to enable the unannounced feature!
post #16 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by lfmorrison View Post

Oh, haven't you guessed it by now? It has gigabit Ethernet hardware inside... You'll just have to buy a firmware update to enable the unannounced feature!

That was pretty funny. I somehow think you may be right.
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post #17 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by aplnub View Post

Your right. This isn't the router I am going to buy. It will be a linksys because they have gigabit ports.

At home I push 5 - 25 GB across my network everynight at 2 and 5 am. System backups to a ethernet HDD SATA will be the next big thing with Apple's big backup program coming out with Leopard.

Let's all get a grip on reality and admit Apple screwed up on this one. It should have been gigabit. Especially for the price they want.


I think you missed my point. You probably wouldn't buy a wireless router for transfering data over a wire.

In fact, the only gigabit Wireless-N router that Linkys makes that I'm aware of is their gaming unit, which is still $179.99 on amazon, and doesn't offer a USB port.
post #18 of 81
am i missing somethin or is this not available for ppc??!! is this the start of apple cutting off the g4/g5 hardware?
post #19 of 81
make sure to give feedback here as soon as it is available.... make sure apple knows you want gigabit ethernet
http://www.apple.com/feedback/

it's a dealbreaker for me too


(don't forget to request FLAC support in iTunes and on the iPod while you're at it too)
post #20 of 81
How long do you think it will be before someone develops a firmware hack to enable the 802.11n functionality for free?
post #21 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomkarl View Post

I'm by no means a network engineer, but other than moving files around within your home network, why would one need gigibit?

In my case, I have DSL. The speed of the dsl is no where near gigabit, so what would 1000/base T ports gain me? If nothing can enter or leave the network any faster than the speed of my dsl I don't see this as an issue.

Who said the Internet is the reason to get gigE? Keep all files on one computer, use them from any other computer on the local network. Why standardize with gigE on all your computers when your own networking products don't take advantage of it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tofino View Post

While i'm personally disappointed that Apple decided NOT to go with gigabit ethernet (after all, all my macs have it built in), i use firewire to push big files around the network. It's not a dealbreaker for me, but i'm hoping for a revision 2 box that will address this. It always strikes me as odd when Apple does these seemingly half-measured things. I'm certainly happy to have more than one ethernet ports on the new airport. i'm also curious if we are gonna see a 'power over ethernet' version of it.

How long are your Firewire cables?

With PoE, then there's a decent reason to not have gigE, I think they are incompatible with each other. I don't think it's there though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MoonShadow View Post

True, gigabit would be nice. But seriously, if you're setting up a network where you're pushing around 20GB of files over ethernet, this isn't the router you're going to buy anyway.
...
I do wish it had 2 USB ports though. I'd like to have my printer and an external drive on it... and I doubt a hub is going to work well, but it might. I wonder if Apple will make a matching USB hard drive so it can "stack?"

There are consumer devices that have gigE, it's not so special that it requires a managed switch. Just pushing around EyeTV recordings around can involve 20GB files.
post #22 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoonShadow View Post

True, gigabit would be nice. But seriously, if you're setting up a network where you're pushing around 20GB of files over ethernet, this isn't the router you're going to buy anyway.

If you want to use time machine to backup your laptop wirelessly to the USB hard drive attatched to the router, this one's for you.

I do wish it had 2 USB ports though. I'd like to have my printer and an external drive on it... and I doubt a hub is going to work well, but it might. I wonder if Apple will make a matching USB hard drive so it can "stack?"

Yes, a hub is reported to work, so you can have multiple hard drives and printers.

Steve
post #23 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

Just pushing around EyeTV recordings around can involve 20GB files.

Yep. I'm always wanting more bandwidth for transferring video content on my 100Mbps LAN.
post #24 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by JCE10 View Post

In that case, we wouldn't need 802.11n speed either, would we? 802.11g can handle current broadband speed just fine. The "but my DSL can't keep up" argument applies to the wireless side too.

If I upgrade my current 11g access point to 11n, I want faster Ethernet speed too. If wired speed is slower than wireless speed, then it might as well forgo the Ethernet ports.

That is an excellent point! I'll have to remember that when the "why do you need GB ethernet?" argument pops up again.
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post #25 of 81
Anyone know if USB scanners and other USB devices sharable with Image Capture can be shared via AirPort Extreme USB, or is it limited to printers and disks?
post #26 of 81
Woah, serious deja-vu from this thread.
Guess i'll have to stop reading the airport threads until new info is around to discuss.

[edit]
Found the source of my deja-vu...
This thread: When will Airportget Gigabit Ethernet?
post #27 of 81
Any new topic will quickly become redundant.
post #28 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjk View Post

Anyone know if USB scanners and other USB devices sharable with Image Capture can be shared via AirPort Extreme USB, or is it limited to printers and disks?

Not really on topic, but I never knew I could share my scanner that I have connected to my Mac Pro. After seeing your post I did that and can now access it from my MacBook Pro. Thanks.

Steve
post #29 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjk View Post

Anyone know if USB scanners and other USB devices sharable with Image Capture can be shared via AirPort Extreme USB, or is it limited to printers and disks?

Not really on topic, but I never knew I could share my scanner that I have connected to my Mac Pro. After seeing your post I did that and can now access it from my MacBook Pro. Thanks.

Steve
post #30 of 81
Hi guys,

For anyone that has been having trouble connecting to wireless base stations (I had an old 3Com router that I was completely unable to connect to with the MacBook Pro Core 2 Duo), this update might be what you're looking for. I'm now able to connect without any problems.

Thanks,
Andy.
post #31 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoonShadow View Post

eh? Gigabit/Megabit doesn't have anything to do with a wireless connection to AppleTV.

Totally. With regard to WIRELESS connections with the Airport Extreme, the maximum rated is 540mbit/sec with typical throughput probably around 200mbit/sec. So Gigabit Ethernet has nothing to do with AppleTV in terms of wireless streaming.
post #32 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by demenas View Post

Yes, a hub is reported to work, so you can have multiple hard drives and printers.

Yes, and I think because the station shares Mac mini dimension (6.5" by 6.5"), hubs designed for Mac mini are perfect addition (e.g., Belkin's Mac mini 4-port USB hub).
post #33 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by intlplby View Post

make sure to give feedback here as soon as it is available.... make sure apple knows you want gigabit ethernet
http://www.apple.com/feedback/
it's a dealbreaker for me too

(don't forget to request FLAC support in iTunes and on the iPod while you're at it too)

...
I'm tempted to say "you're all idiots" but that would just not be nice
I understand the frustration with Gigabit Ethernet, however...
...
Look, the Airport Extreme 802.11n has an average throughput of let's say 200mbit/sec. At least according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/802.11n#802.11n ...Let's assume your AirportExtreme is doing 200mbit/sec average throughput. If this is the primary connection between a file wirelessly coming off a computer, going into the AirportExtreme and then wired going into a computer, the "100mbit/sec bottleneck" is not a serious issue.

As JeffDM alluded to, why not have that wired computer sit closer to where that wireless file is coming from and just FW400 the transfers?

Also otherwise, why not just have most of your computers wired connected with GigabitEthernet??

In some general cases where the Airport Extreme is serving several transfers through it at one time, it will be a 200mbit/sec bandwidth divided up to the various clients, so an ethernet out of 100mbit/sec from it during this time is quite alright.

I understand if Apple has *screwed* up and decided just simply not to go with GigabitEthernet for whatever mysterious reasons they do these sort of things. In which case, a different brand 802.11n with GigE wired ports would serve you better.

The AirportExtreme is meant to be a fast (200mbit/sec bandwidth) wireless base station to
1. Serve 1mbit/sec to 25mbit/sec DSL/Cable broadband to several wireless clients
2. Throughput in realtime or sync iTunes content from 802.11n/g Macs to AppleTV/ AirportExpress(?)Tunes
3. Serve as a general file transfer throughput for files between Macs, WIRELESSly.

As I understand it the wired part of the AirportExtreme is for like old PCs or Macs or maybe a storage device that is not wirelessly-enabled, or have a wired connection to the router to take the "load" of wireless transmission for those computers wired-ly connected to the AirportExtreme.
post #34 of 81
802.11n 200mbit/sec throughput in general may not be enough for backups and transfers of huge video files for the prosumer video (eg EyeTV, DvDRips, etc.) market. In this case, I think, even if you had GigE out of the AirportExtreme, you wouldn't see the speeds you like to push those huge files around.

Clearly either a direct FW400 connection, or a wired GigE router/ cabling setup would be better.

That's the thing with the NetworkAreaStorage devices that are 802.11g and have like 300gbytes or something. To me, it would take ages to put files in and out of it. I'd rather USB2.0 or FW400 those files.

So anyway, just my take on things. Yes, a bit of Apple apologist stuff, but let's have an understanding of what the AirportExtreme is about. Until GigabitWireless comes out, then a complete high-speed-huge-file prosumer video and other applications WIRELESS home/office system would be sensible. In the meantime, IMHO, it's 802.11n for general Apple end-to-end solutions and general wireless access, while people in need for more speed have WIRED USB2.0, FW400/800, GigE router options.
post #35 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by demenas View Post

Not really on topic, but I never knew I could share my scanner that I have connected to my Mac Pro. After seeing your post I did that and can now access it from my MacBook Pro. Thanks.

Glad to help.

My Canon LiDE 50 scanner can't be shared via Image Capture, but my wife's Canon SD200 camera can.
post #36 of 81
It *is* interesting that home/soho networking has become such a mainstream area when before you'd have 10/100BaseT cables running around (like when I was at uni/college in '96-98 ) or some "IT guy" setup the 10/100/1000Ethernet in your office, in the space of the past 10 years.

It's a trickier situation now with huge files and backups. The next big revolution, as I mentioned, and that I'm looking foward to, is WirelessGigabitEthernet and better SMB transactional hash-checked file transfers*. Or maybe I need to checkout BonjourWindows solutions


*For an all-Mac home/soho network things are okay, but Windows/OSX networking via SMB is a pain in the ass with 802.11b/g connections. Files drop out, the STUPID FRACKING MY NETWORK WINDOW in XP just always hangs there, you don't know how long it is taking, what it is doing, if it is checking the network or not, what the timeout is, and so on.

For transferring files from my borrowed Toshiba laptop to my recently-eBay-purchased MacBook or my parents' iBook G4 933mhz, I have found FTP to be the easiest. Run an FTP server on the Toshiba, and Cyberduck or TerminalFTP files in and out. Cyberduck is nice with resuming stopped downloads and stuff.
post #37 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

How long are your Firewire cables?

I use a Belkin Firewire hub with 6m cables for three machines. it probably doesn't work in everybody's setup, but it works beautifully for me, letting me take advantage of FW800 on the machines that support it.

One caveat is: the hub is powered and i managed to fry a friend's mac by plugging it into his third party FW card before plugging in the machine's power cord. i knew i had a problem when the fans came on right away. The real shocker was when Apple replaced his mirror drive G4 with a brand new Quad G5 free of charge, when they couldn't figure out how to fix it. I'm still bitter about it...

Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

With PoE, then there's a decent reason to not have gigE, I think they are incompatible with each other. I don't think it's there though.

Didn't know that. thanks for enlightening me!
post #38 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunilraman View Post

That's the thing with the NetworkAreaStorage devices that are 802.11g and have like 300gbytes or something. To me, it would take ages to put files in and out of it. I'd rather USB2.0 or FW400 those files.

Most of the decent NAS drives actually have gigabit ethernet and support jumbo packets for nice speedy backups of big files. The problem is, I've yet to find a NAS that supports HFS+ fully and Apple File Protocol so it's not uncommon for apple file names to cock up your backup. There's ways around it (using sparse images) but not ideal.

The advantage of the new Airport Extreme is that it DOES have full AFP support for the attached USB drive. That's really good news. Unfortunately, 100Mbit ethernet or wireless kind of makes it pointless as a backup solution or shared storage for semi-pro use. So close but so far.

It's probably workable around as a network router with the addition of a gigabit switch, leaving the Airport Extreme to just do wireless and act as an internet gateway but for the money, it's pointless. Buy a decent gigabit wired router and an access point - SMC do a neat little one for about $20 with WDS support even.
post #39 of 81
Firstly I'd like to mention that according to MacWorld Airport Extreme will give you a throughput of 100mbit/sec. Hence, a GigabitEthernet wired out from Airport Extreme would be worthless. Just throwing it out there for now... http://www.macworld.com/2007/01/feat...211n/index.php

Of course, we have no real-world testing yet because the AirportExtreme will operate 802.11n at 2.4ghz and 802.11n at 5ghz, the latter claimed as "having full 802.11n speed" in the Apple document http://manuals.info.apple.com/en/Des...1nNetworks.pdf
post #40 of 81
In the above Apple document, it says the following. There are four modes of operation:

Choosing the Radio Mode
1.
Choose 802.11n (802.11b/g compatible) from the Radio Mode pop-up menu if
computers with 802.11n, 802.11g, or 802.11b wireless cards will join the network. Each
client computer will connect to the network and transmit network traffic at its highest
speed.
2.
Choose 802.11n only (2.4 GHz) if only computers with 802.11n compatible wireless
cards will join the network in the 2.4 GHz frequency range.
3.
Choose 802.11n (802.11a compatible) if computers with 802.11n and 802.11a wireless
cards will join the network in the 5 GHz frequency range. Computers with 802.11g or
802.11b wireless cards will not be able to join this network.
4.
Choose 802.11n only (5 GHz) if computers with 802.11n wireless cards will join the
network. The transmission rate of the network will be at 802.11n speed. Computers with
802.11g, 802.11b, and 802.11a wireless cards will not be able to join this network.


Ignoring number 3 above, clearly if you are using number 1 above (802.11g and 802.11n devices on 2.4ghz), I would take a shot and estimate that your average throughput WILL NOT be greater than 100mbit/sec. Hence, no need for Gigabit Ethernet.

With number 4. above, I don't know if MacWorld reporting 100mbit/sec throughput is talking about this mode or mode number 2. above. That is, what is the throughput of 802.11n only @2.4ghz vs 802.11n only @5ghz ?? We'll need some solid data once Airport Extreme ships.

The 2.4ghz and 5ghz debate is quite interesting, some other articles: (hopefully all the links work)
http://www.macworld.co.uk/mac/news/i...m?newsid=17059
http://blogs.zdnet.com/Ou/?p=411&tag=nl.e539
http://www.wifinetnews.com/archives/cat_80211n.html
http://www.techworld.com/mobility/fe...amecatsamechan
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