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Extremes enroute to Apple stores; Apple TV to follow

post #1 of 72
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Apple today began shipping the first batches of its new 802.11n wireless router to customers and will soon have them in stores. Meanwhile, the company's equally boxy Apple TV is due just a few weeks later, AppleInsider has learned.

People acquainted with Apple's supply chain said that the Cupertino-based firm began shipments of the $179 Airport Extreme ahead of its self-imposed February schedule and that the network device should start turning up in select Apple retail stores soon as tomorrow.

Display models and advertising are expected to make their way into virtually every store by the end of the week.

Those who ordered from the company, however, may face a more interminable wait. While some Extremes will be shipping at the same time as Apple's retail deliveries, checks with the online store have revealed that others are not scheduled to leave the company's manufacturing facilities until mid-month.

The Apple TV won't be far behind, those same people report. In-store window displays promoting the networked media hub are currently due around February 19th, with actual hardware following later in the same week.

The updated Airport Extreme has garnered both positive word-of-mouth and controversy since its under-the-radar announcement at this month's Macworld San Francisco expo. It earned kudos for both its improved 802.11n Wi-Fi speed (which delivers nearly 5X the maximum speed of its UFO-shaped forefather) and the new AirDisk feature, which shares one or more USB hard disks with everyone on the network regardless of platform.

However, it also received a healthy share of flak thanks to its creator's policy: after confirming that every Core 2 Duo system shipped since late 2006 would support the faster Wi-Fi speeds of the new router, Apple startled more than a few by promising free updates for those select Macs only if they bought Apple's network base station, charging $2 for users content to use third-party routers. The fee was set in place by Apple under the pretext that the Sarbannes-Oxley Act forced the company to charge existing owners for unlocking a hidden feature.

Response to the Apple TV has been less ambiguous, as the Mac mini-shaped device has seen strong pre-sales through Apple's online store. The streaming media center will offer iTunes Store customers the means to play their music and videos directly on newer TV models and will even auto-sync with a specific Mac or PC, caching local content on a 40GB hard drive for offline use.

Much like the Airport Extreme, the Apple TV includes the option of 802.11n wireless for connecting to a local network.
post #2 of 72
If sales have actually been strong for AppleTV, color me surprised.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

 

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

 

Get the lowdown on the coming collapse:  http://www.cbo.gov/publication/45010

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post #3 of 72
Don't forget about the flak from not have gigabit ports.
Hard-Core.
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Hard-Core.
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post #4 of 72
I just received a notice from Apple that my order for 2 AE have shipped! I ordered them about a week after they were released.
post #5 of 72
Apple TV might be a lemon, but I'm still intrigued. I'm still trying to talk my wife into letting me add one to our new HD setup, even though it doesn't (currently) support 1080pXX.

I like the idea of being able to watch diggnation and other podcasts and hear my music in the living room through the entertainment system easily. Sure, I can download and pump them through my 5g iPod, but its just not 'convenient'. The big Apple TV is really just an iPod (with disabled features like play games, why can't I play my $4.99 texas hold'em game on it, dammit)...but it does have N wireless, which I like....
:-D * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
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:-D * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
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post #6 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

"...the Cupertino-based firm..."

... the Cupertino-based iPod maker... ...the Cupertino-based Mac maker... ...the Cupertino-based company... will someone please change the tune!

And have you noticed, at AppleInsider, Microsoft is always "the Redmond-based software giant..." ? Well, thanks for the constant reminder, I might have forgotten just who Microsoft are...

Whatever happened to creative writing?
post #7 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyIslander View Post

... the Cupertino-based iPod maker... ...the Cupertino-based Mac maker... ...the Cupertino-based company... will someone please change the tune!

And have you noticed, at AppleInsider, Microsoft is always "the Redmond-based software giant..." ? Well, thanks for the constant reminder, I might have forgotten just who Microsoft are...

Whatever happened to creative writing?

In other news, the iPod company, Apple Inc, has ....
:-D * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
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:-D * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
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post #8 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyIslander View Post

... the Cupertino-based iPod maker... ...the Cupertino-based Mac maker... ...the Cupertino-based company... will someone please change the tune!

And have you noticed, at AppleInsider, Microsoft is always "the Redmond-based software giant..." ? Well, thanks for the constant reminder, I might have forgotten just who Microsoft are...

Whatever happened to creative writing?


Too much coffee today ?

Personally I don't come here for creative writing.
post #9 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyIslander View Post

... the Cupertino-based iPod maker... ...the Cupertino-based Mac maker... ...the Cupertino-based company... will someone please change the tune!

And have you noticed, at AppleInsider, Microsoft is always "the Redmond-based software giant..." ? Well, thanks for the constant reminder, I might have forgotten just who Microsoft are...

Whatever happened to creative writing?

What ever happened to grammatically correct typing? 'I might have forgotten just who Microsoft are..." try, please, 'I might have forgotten just who Microsoft is...'
I always have the right answers; you just sometimes ask the wrong questions.
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I always have the right answers; you just sometimes ask the wrong questions.
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post #10 of 72
Ah yes the collective noun.
post #11 of 72
I just hope the Superbowl ad(s?) won't just focus on the AppleTv, and the iPhone, assuming they mention the phone at all.

I'd like to see some new product. This is the first Macworld where we had almost nothing from Apple.
post #12 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by damiansipko View Post

What ever happened to gramatically correct typing? 'I might have forgotten just who Microsoft are..." try, please, 'I might have forgotten just who Microsoft is...'

That's the way they write in England. "Apple are", rather than "Apple is".

"I'm going to hospital", rather than "I'm going to the hospital, etc".
post #13 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

That's the way they write in England. "Apple are", rather than "Apple is".

"I'm going to hospital", rather than "I'm going to the hospital, etc".

What do you expect from people who drive on the wrong side of the road ?
post #14 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by aplnub View Post

Don't forget about the flak from not have gigabit ports.

Instead of "flak", it's more like "squirts" from obsessive geeks.
post #15 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

That's the way they write in England. "Apple are", rather than "Apple is".
"I'm going to hospital", rather than "I'm going to the hospital, etc".

I swear British English (The Queen's Colonial Best) calls for "Apple is an extraordinary company" and "I am going to the hospital"... It's all those riff-raff in Britain that have fracked things up, if what you are saying is true. The Queen's Colonial Best also calls for "I will be writing to Apple to complain" rather than the US version of "I will be writing Apple to complain".
post #16 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by K.C. View Post

What do you expect from people who drive on the wrong side of the road ?

and came up with the language in the first place
post #17 of 72
Just in: AirportExtremes and AppleTVs will start showing up in Australia sometime in July 2007.... Nah, just mucking around. We'll probably see stock in 2 weeks. AppleStore Online Australia is saying "Estimated Ship: 3-4 weeks".

I don't know how well AppleTV will do here, AFAIK the only iTunes Store content would be music and music videos. Other than that, podcasts, I guess. For the more adventurous there'll be other iPod-converted content, and maybe Elgato/Miglia TV-recorded stuff. Or maybe home movies from iMovieHD synced into iTunes/AppleTV.
post #18 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunilraman View Post

I swear British English (The Queen's Colonial Best) calls for "Apple is an extraordinary company" and "I am going to the hospital"... It's all those riff-raff in Britain that have fracked things up, if what you are saying is true. The Queen's Colonial Best also calls for "I will be writing to Apple to complain" rather than the US version of "I will be writing Apple to complain".

Well, what I said is right. If you watch the BBC you will see for yourself. They refer to companies, and institutions in the plural. Peerhaps that's not technically correct over there, but it's how it's spoken, and usually written.
post #19 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trendannoyer View Post

and came up with the language in the first place

Or not.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origin_of_language
post #20 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Well, what I said is right. If you watch the BBC you will see for yourself. They refer to companies, and institutions in the plural. Peerhaps that's not technically correct over there, but it's how it's spoken, and usually written.

Well, if it's the BBC, then it's high-quality British standard. Seriously. The BBC don't mess around. Or is that "doesn't mess around"....??! I guess the British English I learnt growing up truly *was* "colonial", looks like the Brits moved on with the evolution of their language. Bugger.

Meh. Maybe I'll get my act together and learn Spanish, Hindi and Mandarin, not necessarily in that order. I swear it's more important to be multi-lingual in these languages: English, Spanish (mainland or Central/SouthAmerica/Mexico/USA), Hindi, and Mandarin(Simplified China Standard) - than to be super-good in just English or a *single* language.
post #21 of 72
I have an older first gen Intel Core Duo iMac 17". I know it won't have the wireless n built in but what about any new Airport Cards to upgrade my old system. Why have we not heard about this. I mean I have a great machine and it is all enclosed and everything that is not enclosed is either wireless or connected through the network wireless. So please Apple start talking about the new Airport Express Card to upgrade older iMac's, Macbooks, iBooks, MacBook Pro's and PowerBooks. Please Please Please don't leave us with third party external devices to get the 802.11n standard. This would be very un-Apple.
post #22 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunilraman View Post

I swear British English (The Queen's Colonial Best) calls for "Apple is an extraordinary company" and "I am going to the hospital"... It's all those riff-raff in Britain that have fracked things up, if what you are saying is true. The Queen's Colonial Best also calls for "I will be writing to Apple to complain" rather than the US version of "I will be writing Apple to complain".

Correct.

Although, colloquially, in the North West (Lancashire, Yorkshire...) where I live, it's not unusual to drop words like 'the' or 'to' or just replace them with 't' orally and it spills over into written English with children to. It's very annoying explaining it to them.

edit: And with regard to using collective nouns, we use both 'are' and 'is'. It depends on the context. We'd use 'Apple are a great company' to refer to Apple as a whole entity formally however, we'd use 'Apple is comprised of many great people' to refer to the individuals that make up Apple. We'd also might say 'Apple is stupid' as it's rude. It's kind of like in French or Japanese where there's a polite way to refer to a company or group and an impolite way. That's changing though as American English invades.

IIRC Americans just simplify the language to the 'is' form to refer to either and drop any context or formal deference. That might be partly why many British find Americans rude.
post #23 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I just hope the Superbowl ad(s?) won't just focus on the AppleTv, and the iPhone, assuming they mention the phone at all.

I'd like to see some new product. This is the first Macworld where we had almost nothing from Apple.

Me too. *wipes tear from eye* Me Too.
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post #24 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Well, what I said is right. If you watch the BBC you will see for yourself. They refer to companies, and institutions in the plural. Peerhaps that's not technically correct over there, but it's how it's spoken, and usually written.

Well, if you hear someone on the BBC using a plural for a company, then they wrong
- just shows that the BBC ain't wot is used to be! Know wot I mean? Innit?

It's nothing to do with British English vs American English
- a company is singular because it is a single legal entity
- and the fact that a company contains many people is irrelevant, no matter which side of the Atlantic you happen to live on.
- to say 'Apple are' or 'Microsoft are' is as wrong as saying 'the train are full of people'



It's not just the BBC that has learned how not to speak English properly - even our beloved Prime Minister will try to adopt a colloquial accent when he wants to sound cool - like saying 'be''er' instead of 'be'tt'er'. Or as you Americans would say 'Be'dd'er'.
post #25 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai1999 View Post

It's nothing to do with British English vs American English
- a company is singular because it is a single legal entity
- and the fact that a company contains many people is irrelevant, no matter which side of the Atlantic you happen to live on.
- to say 'Apple are' or 'Microsoft are' is as wrong as saying 'the train are full of people'

Nope. "Apple are" and "Apple is" are both correct.
post #26 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trendannoyer View Post

and came up with the language in the first place

There is no such thing as "coming up with a language". Languages evolve from other languages. Most of the quirks of British English are from other languages, primarily French.
post #27 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chucker View Post

Nope. "Apple are" and "Apple is" are both correct.

Why?
post #28 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai1999 View Post

Why?

Because English grammar is defined that way? Because things simply have evolved to this over the millennia?
post #29 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chucker View Post

Because English grammar is defined that way? Because things simply have evolved to this over the millennia?

Hmm, my company are small, whereas Microsoft are large!
post #30 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai1999 View Post

Hmm, my company are small, whereas Microsoft are large!

It doesn't work with "my company", because that's not a proper name.
post #31 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai1999 View Post

Well, if you hear someone on the BBC using a plural for a company, then they wrong
- just shows that the BBC ain't wot is used to be! Know wot I mean? Innit?

It's nothing to do with British English vs American English
- a company is singular because it is a single legal entity
- and the fact that a company contains many people is irrelevant, no matter which side of the Atlantic you happen to live on.
- to say 'Apple are' or 'Microsoft are' is as wrong as saying 'the train are full of people'



It's not just the BBC that has learned how not to speak English properly - even our beloved Prime Minister will try to adopt a colloquial accent when he wants to sound cool - like saying 'be''er' instead of 'be'tt'er'. Or as you Americans would say 'Be'dd'er'.

I go by usage. What is considered to be correct is no longer correct if few are using it. That's how language evolves.

Take the word "fun". I don't know about how you see it over there, but over here, its usage is changing.

"It's so fun." has become common. I don't like it. But, even teachers are using it. Parents who want to be seen as cool are using it. It's wrong. But, perhaps, in another 10 or 20 years, it won't be.

Accents are different. The word usage, or grammar, isn't changing.

As Aegis has pointed out, companies and institutions are referred to in the collective, that's why they are using plurals.
post #32 of 72
Why is it people always bitch over a few grammer mistakes. I think we all understand the fracking meaning of the article.

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post #33 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by damiansipko View Post

What ever happened to gramatically correct typing? 'I might have forgotten just who Microsoft are..." try, please, 'I might have forgotten just who Microsoft is...'

Interesting point you make, which is always the subject of much discussion. But whatever happened to correct spelling? Shouldn't that be 'grammatically'?
post #34 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyIslander View Post

Interesting point you make, which is always the subject of much discussion. But whatever happened to correct spelling? Shouldn't that be 'grammatically'?

When can we get back to bitchin' about how crap Zune is, or wondering when the 'true-video-ipod' will be released - that's wot I want to know!
post #35 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai1999 View Post

When can we get back to bitchin' about how crap Zune is, or wondering when the 'true-video-ipod' will be released - that's wot I want to know!

That's become boring. This is much more interesting.
post #36 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by K.C. View Post

Or not.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origin_of_language

When the Wiki says,"This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject." You should operate with a high degree of skepticism...
post #37 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

That's become boring. This is much more interesting.

Well thank you, melgross, nothing like sparking a debate by speaking one's mind. Off topic, yes - apologies, but at least it went off in some interesting directions!
post #38 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

That's become boring. This is much more interesting.

Ok then...
When I was a wee laddie at school in Scotland, we had it drummed into us that collective nouns were singular
- perhaps that was just a Scottish-English thing, and not an English-English thing. Until today I hadn't realised that there was a different treatment of collective nouns between American-English and English-English (and possibly Scottish-English)
- and perhaps American-English is closer to Scottish-English in some respects?

But, anyway, I'd argue that a company name such as 'Apple' or 'Microsoft' is not a collective noun
- since the company name refers to a single legal entity - a 'company' that has, under (English and I presume US) Law, the legal status of an individual. It's a separate singular entity, not a plurality of entities. So it should be referred to in the singular.

When we refer to 'Microsoft' in the plural (e.g. 'Microsoft' are a monopoly) we're just using the plural because we know there's more than one person in Microsoft. But I'm sure my Scottish-English teacher would have ticked me off for such a slovenly use of language!
post #39 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai1999 View Post

Ok then...
When I was a wee laddie at school in Scotland, we had it drummed into us that collective nouns were singular
- perhaps that was just a Scottish-English thing, and not an English-English thing. Until today I hadn't realised that there was a different treatment of collective nouns between American-English and English-English (and possibly Scottish-English)
- and perhaps American-English is closer to Scottish-English in some respects?

But, anyway, I'd argue that a company name such as 'Apple' or 'Microsoft' is not a collective noun
- since the company name refers to a single legal entity - a 'company' that has under (English law, and I presume US Law) the legal status of a individual. It's a separate singular entity, not a plurality of entities. So it should be referred to in the singular.

When we refer to 'Microsoft' in the plural (e.g. 'Microsoft' are a monopoly) we're just using the plural because we know there's more than one person in Microsoft. But I'm sure my Scottish-English teacher would have ticked me off for such a slovenly use of language!

From what I know, corporations are treated as an individual, legally a "person", pretty much everywhere around the world, though there might be exceptions. I can't think of a convenient way to deal with them any other way.

But, aside from that, there is a cultural imperative at work as well. I don't know how other kanguages deal with it, but in England, at least, institutions seem to be thought of a a unit composed of individuals, therefore the plural. I will read something such as "Apple are", rather than "Apple is".

Dropping the "the" is also interesting. "Going to hospital". We would say "going to the hospital".

But, we would say "Going to college". On the other hand, we would say "Going to the university", when they would say "Going to university".

It seems as though we have a different way of being specific, rather than general.

When they drop the "the" is it because they mean a specific place, even though it isn't stated? We often seem to ignore that.
post #40 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

If sales have actually been strong for AppleTV, color me surprised.

I expect Apple to have a higher than usual number of returns on these once people realize that a lot of video from outside the iTunes Store won't play on it, or that it won't hook up to their TV, etc. It was a great idea, but Apple really fell through on the specs.
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