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High-quality AirPort Extreme 802.11n unboxing photos - Page 2

post #41 of 106
What has lighting / thunderstorm do with phone line? Sorry if this is a stupid question.
Would be nice if apple make variation with ADSL 2+ Modem that would appeal to 50%+ of the internet population who uses ADSL technology. ( Especially in the UK where they will sell loads, but then i would properly whine about Gigabit ethernet ^^)

And i read somewhere that it has 4 internal antenna?

And Has anyone tried the USB Disc sharing? Wanted to know if itunes server works.....
post #42 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoinks View Post

Excellent pictures - they put my phototography skills to shame.

I like the design very much and want an 802.11n access point. However, I have a couple of questions?
  1. How does the 802.11n perform in a mixed environment, e.g. with 802.11b&g devices as well as 802.11n clients? All the devices I have that connect wirelessly are 802.11g (iBook G4, PSP, DS) - I'll be purchasing a Macbook soon (about the same time Leopard is released).
  2. Can it act as an wireless access point client or bridge? At present I have two identical US Robotics wireless routers - one is set up as an access point that connects directly to my ADSL modem and my web server (a Mac Mini). The other is in another room set-up as an access point client. The client has a hub connected and I am then able to directly connect to my xbox360, Slingbox and Pinnacle Showcenter.


From what i read the current N implementation does work well in mixed environment. By that i mean you get only half the theoretical maximum 802.11n speed. It would still be faster then G though.
post #43 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoinks View Post

Excellent pictures - they put my phototography skills to shame.

I like the design very much and want an 802.11n access point. However, I have a couple of questions?
  1. How does the 802.11n perform in a mixed environment, e.g. with 802.11b&g devices as well as 802.11n clients? All the devices I have that connect wirelessly are 802.11g (iBook G4, PSP, DS) - I'll be purchasing a Macbook soon (about the same time Leopard is released).
  2. Can it act as an wireless access point client or bridge? At present I have two identical US Robotics wireless routers - one is set up as an access point that connects directly to my ADSL modem and my web server (a Mac Mini). The other is in another room set-up as an access point client. The client has a hub connected and I am then able to directly connect to my xbox360, Slingbox and Pinnacle Showcenter.

AirPort Extreme supports three wireless modes. Looks like you'll be going for number 2:
̂
  1. Create a wireless network. Choose this option if you are creating a new AirPort Extreme network.
  2. Participate in a WDS network. Choose this option if you are creating a new WDS network, or connecting this AirPort Extreme Base Station to a WDS network that is already set up. (In this case connecting "bridge/repeating" your RoboticsRouter)
  3. Extend a wireless network. Choose this option if you plan to connect another AirPort Extreme 802.11n Base Station to the network you are setting up.

Choosing the Radio Mode: You will want to choose number 1:
  1. Choose “802.11n (802.11b/g compatible)” from the Radio Mode pop-up menu if computers with 802.11n, 802.11g, or 802.11b wireless cards will join the network. Each client computer will connect to the network and transmit network traffic at its highest speed.
  2. Choose “802.11n only (2.4 GHz)” if only computers with 802.11n compatible wireless cards will join the network in the 2.4 GHz frequency range.
  3. Choose “802.11n (802.11a compatible)” if computers with 802.11n and 802.11a wireless cards will join the network in the 5 GHz frequency range. Computers with 802.11g or 802.11b wireless cards will not be able to join this network.
  4. Choose “802.11n only (5 GHz)” if computers with 802.11n wireless cards will join the network. The transmission rate of the network will be at 802.11n speed. Computers with 802.11g, 802.11b, and 802.11a wireless cards will not be able to join this network.

............From the manuals posted at thread: http://appleinsider.com/article.php?id=2443
post #44 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by fuyutsuki View Post

Keeping it in size with the Mac Mini and Apple TV seems smart and overall it has a nice iPod dock aesthetic.

Apple TV is about 3cm larger than a Mac Mini and the new Airport
post #45 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksec View Post

What has lighting / thunderstorm do with phone line? Sorry if this is a stupid question......

Your phone line = voice + DSL. Lightning strikes phone line (if phone lines are overhead not underground) = power surge going down phone line = fried cordless phones, fried DSL modem. If you live in a country that has thunderstorms, you'll know.....
post #46 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksec View Post

And i read somewhere that it has 4 internal antenna?...

There should be at least 3 radios (MIMO) (Multiple In Multiple Out)... Let us know if you find out more info. The 802.11n cards in Core2Duo Macs have 3 antenna/radios (you can see this on the mini-PCIe card on the motherboard... My MacBookCore[1]Duo has 2 antenna/radios - one for 802.11b/g@2ghz and one for 802.11a@5ghz, I think....)
post #47 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

In the UK pretty much everyone does. Which poses the question: How do I connect this thing to the Internet?

I went into PC World - and the number of ADSL modems for sale was precisely zero.
(not counting USB types). There was an entire wall of ADSL / Wireless / Router combo boxes.

C,

Answer: Get a very cheap 802.11b/g wireless/adsl combo box. Use this as DSL modem. Connect ethernet 100Mbit/sec out of cheapo DSL/Router into the WAN-in port of 802.11-n pretty teh sexay new AirportExtreme. Bingo bango all sorted mate.
post #48 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunilraman View Post

Answer: Get a very cheap 802.11b/g wireless/adsl combo box. Use this as DSL modem. Connect ethernet 100Mbit/sec out of cheapo DSL/Router into the WAN-in port of 802.11-n pretty teh sexay new AirportExtreme. Bingo bango all sorted mate.

Not exactly elegant tho...

I could put my old combo box into this role - but...
...Disabling the firewall is not something that it seems happy about- and two firewalls is a problem for some software.

I find that I can buy a dedicated ADSL (ethernet) modem by mail order. But it makes the Apple kit more expensive and more complicated to install. Kinda non-applish really.

A combo box would be a smart move in territories contaminiated with USB Modem blight.

C.
post #49 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

In the UK pretty much everyone does. Which poses the question: How do I connect this thing to the Internet?

I went into PC World - and the number of ADSL modems for sale was precisely zero.
(not counting USB types). There was an entire wall of ADSL / Wireless / Router combo boxes.

C,

That's moot, because ISPs typically give you a modem anyway.
post #50 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chucker View Post

That's moot, because ISPs typically give you a modem anyway.

I don't know which UK you live in, but the majority of ISPs in this UK give out PC-only USB modems. Or provide a "wires-only" service with no modem altogether.

C.
post #51 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zandros View Post

What do I miss about this? Wall mounting, gigabit ethernet (even for wan) , connections for external antennas, place for an Firewire drive (this is Apple, after all), a standard shape power brick (consistency) and a magsafe DC port.

It's really not worth 180 dollars right now.

Activity LEDs are unneccesary, though.

I do hope it's the same size as the Mac Mini, for stackability.

They are not activity lights. They are status lights. Best check out the manuals. They are available for downloading.
post #52 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zandros View Post

What do I miss about this? Wall mounting.

Wall mounting is not recommended for best performance. Best off the floor, away from wall (particular an outside wall, and metal objects (metal file cabinets, metal studs, etc.) The closer to these obstructions, the more severe the interference and the weaker the connection.

As well, "the new AirPort Extreme up to five times the performance and twice the range of the previous AirPort Extreme.Using MIMO (Multiple In Multiple Out) smart antennae and 802.11n technology"
post #53 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

I don't know which UK you live in, but the majority of ISPs in this UK give out PC-only USB modems. Or provide a "wires-only" service with no modem altogether.

C.

That's a wierd system. All the ISPs in Ontario give you a plug-into-the-wall modem that you connect up to your router.
post #54 of 106
Well it is UK afterall ><. Which used to have crappy Internet service until recently.
Another thing about ADSL modem is you need YET another power prick.
With the increasing amount of gadget we are stacking in our living room no one seems to realize this.
post #55 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by fastred View Post

My Airport Extreme 802.11n arrived 2 days ago.... and I live in *New Zealand*.... must be the first time ever that we get stuff this early!

Its working famously.

Jeremy

I want to know the speed most of all, how fast can it transfer 1Gb file?
Any new software features?

Jeremy, Where about in New Zealand are you? Im in Auckland. You are right us getting things quickly are a first, since it took 4 years to get a iTune store, then it was music only.
post #56 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

They are not activity lights. They are status lights. Best check out the manuals. They are available for downloading.

Uh. I assumed there weren't any activity lights, so I listed it as something I liked, to counter all my whining.
post #57 of 106
Nice...acts as a bridge. Some don't. Whether it behaves well in a b/g network remains to be seen. Also if it operates in n-only or just mixed mode like the Buffalo. The chipset is okay but like in the case of the buffalo some manufacturers do different things.

Vinea
post #58 of 106
Someone should really standardize DC power distribution. Each house could have a centralized set of transformers, that provide a variety of voltages to sockets around the house... Would really save on all these stupid tangles of power bricks I have to carry around with my laptop and two external hard disks...
post #59 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by vinea View Post

Nice...acts as a bridge. Some don't. Whether it behaves well in a b/g network remains to be seen. Also if it operates in n-only or just mixed mode like the Buffalo. The chipset is okay but like in the case of the buffalo some manufacturers do different things.
Vinea

As I understand from the Apple manuals, The b/g network mode is the "802.11n/b/g mixed mode @ 2.4ghz". Apple recommends using Channel 1, 6, or 11, for most spread between competing networks in range of your router. Most people usually leave it on the default which is like somewhere in the middle, so I'd use Channel 1 or 2, or depending on what http://www.istumbler.net shows up as channels neighbouring networks are using.

I've got two idiots (pardon the arrogance) with brilliant network names "Belkin54g" and "NETGEAR" using Channel 11. Not good, though they are using some WiFi security. I've got a "Motorola" on Channel 3 (I'm on Channel 2) but it's furthest away from me at very low pickup signal so not a problemo at this stage.

Vinea, from the Apple manuals, AFAIK, there are four modes. 802.11n/b/g@2.4ghz, 802.11n-only@2.4ghz, 802.11n-only@5ghz[fastest], and 802.11n/a@5ghz. It should be in a mixed mode b/g environment [802.11n/b/g@2.4ghz setting in AirportExtreme], yeah, we will have to see how smart the AirportExtreme is in terms of "switching" the speeds depending on the client connection. It should try and hit 100mbit/sec for packets in and out of 802.11n clients and say 30mbit/sec (all figures given are throughputs[?]) for 802.11g clients connecting. We'll need some hardcore bechmarking which I would *looove* to see.

<rambling>Frack, if I set up a PayPal Donate linky I'd do tons of research for you peoples! And feed myself and pay rent as well! Maybe I need to sign up and work at some Tech/Mac magazine. I do have some writing skills, it doesn't have to be perfect anyway because writers just write and the editors clean up the text to flow with the standards/ style of their publication. </rambling>
post #60 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

... USB Modem blight....

USB broadband modems are tools of the Devil !!! ... Very evil.
post #61 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

Not exactly elegant tho...
...I could put my old combo box into this role - but...
...Disabling the firewall is not something that it seems happy about- and two firewalls is a problem for some software.

You could just trust the old combo box firewall to firewall the DSL in/out, and no need to firewall any other connections. That is, the AirportExtreme can have its firewall turned off, I'm fairly sure of this. If you want to be extra careful (paranoid, almost) you can turn on the software firewalls in SysPreferences in Macs.
post #62 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by eAi View Post

Someone should really standardize DC power distribution. Each house could have a centralized set of transformers, that provide a variety of voltages to sockets around the house... Would really save on all these stupid tangles of power bricks I have to carry around with my laptop and two external hard disks...

I can handle plumbing and carpentry, but electricity I never got the handle on (odd I suppose for a computer nerd).
I love this idea. But I suppose you would have to have dedicated outlets for DC?
Thats a pain.

However, as everything these days seems to have processors and need DC
--and as these power bricks are not only a PITA
--but also tend to drain trickle charges of electricity that can add up
--so a whole house solution could be awesome.

Anyone out there know enough about electrons to know if it would be possible to set something up like this without the trickle loss of electricity? Or is there something about having a hot AC outlet that is inherently wasteful?
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post #63 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bageljoey View Post

Anyone out there know enough about electrons to know if it would be possible to set something up like this without the trickle loss of electricity? Or is there something about having a hot AC outlet that is inherently wasteful?

If I remember reading somewhere AC is used because it is best for transmitting huge amounts of electricity through towers, etc.

In the home though, wiring up DC outlets kinda makes sense. The problem(?) though is that the power brick doesn't just convert AC to DC but it also transforms the voltage. In otherwords, every power brick will transform AC240V or 110/120V or whatever is standard for *that country* or in the case of Mac laptop power adaptors it will handle 110-240V, into a *particular* DC voltage.

If I am not wrong, it is possible your Mac Mini, AirportExtreme, Modem, Modem/Router, ExtHardDisk all run off different DC voltages. If you had DC sockets in your house, what voltages would you have them at?
post #64 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bageljoey View Post

I can handle plumbing and carpentry, but electricity I never got the handle on (odd I suppose for a computer nerd).
I love this idea. But I suppose you would have to have dedicated outlets for DC?
Thats a pain.

However, as everything these days seems to have processors and need DC
--and as these power bricks are not only a PITA
--but also tend to drain trickle charges of electricity that can add up
--so a whole house solution could be awesome.

Anyone out there know enough about electrons to know if it would be possible to set something up like this without the trickle loss of electricity? Or is there something about having a hot AC outlet that is inherently wasteful?

There are probably quite a few reasons why no solutions exist.

It's one thing to hardwire a bunch of DC circutry for say 12 volts, or 24v. The problem is every device you own, is going to have different power requirements. If you have 5 different devices they probably run at 5 different voltages, so they're still going to need 5 different transformers/rectifiers.

Another thing is that DC transmission isn't as efficient as AC. As much as powerbricks suck, it's more efficient to have the 3 ft of wire from your powerbrick to your device running DC than 30+ft running though your wall to a transformer in your basement. Also DC typically requires larger guage wire to carry the equalvelent Amperage/Voltage Combination of AC.

It's a tradeoff, lets say someone made a magic transformer box that say had 24 circuits that came out the back, and you could dial in a voltage and amperage per circuit. Now you're adding to the complexity and expense of the wiring in your house. Now you'll have to get some standardized plug to use with it. What happens if you accidently plug in your cellpohne, into your Mac Mini Socket? Your cellphone is probably toast, or at least the battery is.

I think it probably comes down to KISS, Powerbricks suck, but they're pretty easy to use, and hard to screw up.

It could be possible to come up with a solution for this, but when it's all said and done It's not necessarily going to be better, just different and more expensive.

Also, I am by no means an electrican, or electrical engineer, I just hang out with a bunch of wind power nerds.
post #65 of 106
I just checked, my MacBook says 100-240V AC in, output 16.5V (DC). The cordless phone takes 240V AC and outputs 9V (DC). Now either my dslmodem/router or the wireless transmitter (I wasn't going to pull the plug to find out which and the wires are all jammed in the back) ... that outputs AC.. at a much lower voltage.
post #66 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunilraman View Post

Your phone line = voice + DSL. Lightning strikes phone line (if phone lines are overhead not underground) = power surge going down phone line = fried cordless phones, fried DSL modem. If you live in a country that has thunderstorms, you'll know.....

Phone lines will be grounded out at the box before they fry the internal home circuitry. If you've got ADSL in the states and your outside box hasn't been added to include phone, cable and satellite grounding then contact your tech to do it.

The odds of frying the phone line via lightning is extremely remote. I live in an area with yearly lightning storms and haven't lost a phone yet in over 3 decades.
post #67 of 106
One can surmise they didn't want to release 2 different models to satisfy either market segment. They are interested in being the next level of the infrastructure.
post #68 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by timmillwood View Post

just wish it had an ADSL modem built in

I second that with my first post too!
It just doesnt make sense to have a nice looking router and an ugly adsl modem sitting there, more wires too!
post #69 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

Phone lines will be grounded out at the box before they fry the internal home circuitry. If you've got ADSL in the states and your outside box hasn't been added to include phone, cable and satellite grounding then contact your tech to do it.

The odds of frying the phone line via lightning is extremely remote. I live in an area with yearly lightning storms and haven't lost a phone yet in over 3 decades.

My parents house in Malaysia, the outside phone box is rather, well, just tragic. the box isn't even closed, the lid is like hanging off it and the pole it sits on is near collapsing. The phone and DSL company (TM and TMNet) refuses to do anything about it.
post #70 of 106
Here's a review of the Airport Extreme....
http://reviews.digitaltrends.com/review4331.html

Is it just me, or are those numbers rather disappointing?

C.
post #71 of 106
Bonjour and FTP transfer of 50MB file:
1. 2.4GHz unencrypted 802.11g/n Avg. 1.7MB/s
2. 2.4GHz encrypted 802.11g/n Avg. 3.4MB/s
3. 2.4GHz unencrypted 802.11n Avg. 2.3MB/s
4. 2.4GHz encrypted 802.11n Avg. 20KB/s (yes, 20KB/s)
5. 5GHz unencrypted 802.11n Avg. 6.2MB/s
6. 5GHz encrypted 802.11n Avg. 6.1MB/s
7. Wired-only via AirPort Extreme Avg. 11MB/s
8. Wired-only with Gigabit LAN Avg. 20MB/s

Let's break it down. Convert to Megabit/sec (x8)
1. 13.6 Mbit/sec
2. 27.2 Mbit/sec
3. 18.4 Mbit/sec
4. 0.16 Mbit/sec
5. 49.6 Mbit/sec
6. 48.8 Mbit/sec
7. 88.0 Mbit/sec
8. 160 Mbit/sec

.......Um, gotta run, so... Thanks for the numbers and the review link.

Told y'all so about the 100mbit/sec ethernet outs on the AirportExtreme.
Told ya so... muah haah aah h ha

Great to hear the range is fantastic but the no. 5 and 6 above should be closer to 100Mbit/sec.
post #72 of 106
Nonetheless, the review sums it out decently:
As you can see, the 802.11n protocol reached about half the speeds of a wired 10/100BASE-T network and a little less than 1/3 the speed of a Gigabit connection. For a wireless protocol, that's pretty impressive! Unless you're doing heavy A/V work and need to move gigabyte files across your network on a regular basis, this 802.11n protocol may be sufficient for most networking needs.
post #73 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

Here's a review of the Airport Extreme....
http://reviews.digitaltrends.com/review4331.html

Is it just me, or are those numbers rather disappointing?

C.

Well, I'm still working off the original Airport with my Ti Book so I have no frame of reference for speedy wireless, but the review didn't seem too concerned...

Quote:
you can see, the 802.11n protocol reached about half the speeds of a wired 10/100BASE-T network and a little less than 1/3 the speed of a Gigabit connection. For a wireless protocol, that's pretty impressive!

and even more glowing:

Quote:
One thing I found particularly impressive was the fact that my overall Internet speeds increased two-fold after installing the AirPort Extreme. Previously, I was getting an average of 2,400kbps with my 6mbps Comcast connection (using Motorola's SB5120 modem and speakeasy.net's speed test).

After I hooked up the AirPort Extreme base station and configured it for encrypted 802.11n running at 5GHz, my average speed tests ranked closer to 5,900kbps down and 350kbps up! That's awesome! Even directly connected to the cable modem, speeds never jump over 6,100kbps, so to have 6mbps wireless is a real treat. On a day-to-day basis, this will be much appreciated and nearly justifies the $179 price tag of the AirPort Extreme.

The only compliant I saw in the review in terms of speed was the AirDisk feature...
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post #74 of 106
Hmmm maybe I will replace my old d-link with the new airport after all.
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post #75 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunilraman View Post

The problem(?) though is that the power brick doesn't just convert AC to DC but it also transforms the voltage. In otherwords, every power brick will transform AC240V or 110/120V or whatever is standard for *that country* or in the case of Mac laptop power adaptors it will handle 110-240V, into a *particular* DC voltage.

If I am not wrong, it is possible your Mac Mini, AirportExtreme, Modem, Modem/Router, ExtHardDisk all run off different DC voltages. If you had DC sockets in your house, what voltages would you have them at?

Bear with me here as I have already admitted my shaky understanding of electrons...

Don't devices like a laptop vary the voltages for the different components already? don't the screen, the HDD, the airport card and so on have different power requirements? My assumption is that converting voltages is something that devices could do on their own with simple (i.e. no power-brick) solutions.

Of course, I may be missing something obvious like volts versus amperage which I don't get so well... {Sorry Mr Kuper/HS Physics}

Then there is the problem of inefficiency. I don't know how bad the inefficiency problems for whole house wiring are and that could be significant. I don't like power-bricks and I believe that nearly every appliance beyond the light-bulb is likely to need DC for processors in the future, but I don't want a solution that wastes MORE electricity...
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post #76 of 106
You can't convert one DC voltage into another.
But you *can* convert AC voltages. (using inductance)
And then you can turn AC into DC (using a rectifier)

It's all very clever.

C.
post #77 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bageljoey

Bear with me here as I have already admitted my shaky understanding of electrons...

Heck, I ain't so good either :-0

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bageljoey

Don't devices like a laptop vary the voltages for the different components already? don't the screen, the HDD, the airport card and so on have different power requirements? My assumption is that converting voltages is something that devices could do on their own with simple (i.e. no power-brick) solutions.

Yes there are separate "rails" for example in desktop computers with different voltages. For the laptop power-brick though, that does a big job of taking 100 to 240 Volts down to just 16.5 Volts for my MacBook power adaptor... That's quite a bit of a job.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bageljoey

Then there is the problem of inefficiency. I don't know how bad the inefficiency problems for whole house wiring are and that could be significant. I don't like power-bricks and I believe that nearly every appliance beyond the light-bulb is likely to need DC for processors in the future, but I don't want a solution that wastes MORE electricity...

Here's a good site about why AC is used widely [Because easy to transform via electromagnetic coils], and why AC is transmitted at high Voltages [Because more efficient overall]....
http://www.school-for-champions.com/...ansformers.htm

................ Next:

The AC to DC is done by something called a "rectifier"
*random web snippet*
A rectifier is an electric check valve. A check valve is a pneumatic or
hydraulic device allowing only one-way flow. One-way flow is the key.

An early vacuum tube rectifier was called a Fleming Valve. Electrons
would flow from a cathode to an anode but not the other way because the
cathode was heated and the anode was not. Vacuum tubes are still called
valves in the United Kingdom.

Today's rectifiers are almost all solid-state based on the PN junction. A
PN junction is made of a single crystal (usually silicon) with impurities
called "dopants" that change the nature of charge flow in the dopant
area. If you put a voltage across a cube of pure silicon, half the
current will flow in the form of electrons free of atoms, and half will
flow in the form of holes (places where the crystal "thinks" an electron
should be). The holes are effectively positive charges. So, if you dose
one half the cube with "donor" dopant, 99.9% percent of charge flow
becomes electrons, and the material is now called "N." The other half can
be dosed with "acceptor" dopant, and 99.9% of charge flow becomes holes
and the material is called "P." The border is called a PN junction.

A PN junction rectifies because only voltage polarity that pushes holes
and electrons toward the junction causes current flow. The holes and
electrons "recombine" at the junction. The opposite polarity pulling
holes and electrons away from the junction, prevents current flow because
when the holes come to the attached wire they cannot go further. Metal
does not allow "hole flow."


PN junction is hard to visualise without some sort of diagram, of which there are a lot out there...

Most modern rectifiers today may make use of both alternate states of the AC current to create DC current.

Okay, my mind is clogged now, this is the little bits I know... Now need to flush brain cache to focus on other stuff.
Fascinating, no?
post #78 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

You can't convert one DC voltage into another.
But you *can* convert AC voltages. (using inductance)
And then you can turn AC into DC (using a rectifier)

It's all very clever.

C.

Yeah, what he said ^^^^
post #79 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecking View Post

Hmmm maybe I will replace my old d-link with the new airport after all.

You may want to keep it ...Unless assuming you are having your home network to run in 802.11n-only-@5ghz. Running 802.11n/b/g@2.4ghz or 802.11n-only@2.4ghz seems to only give G-level speeds.

2.4ghz is the bogeyman here. Naughty spectrum. Teh messy. 802.11b/g latest devices with MIMO can handle it quite well, for say 10-30Mbit/sec throughput. 802.11n/b/g playing in this space pushes 10-30+Mbit/sec throughput. But the true trick of 802.11n is running at 5ghz where it can do channel bonding and be out of the way of all those 2.4ghz wifi networks flooding the airspace... 802.11n-only@5ghz seems to be able to break the 50Mbit/sec "throughput barrier".

The ideal solution is instead of running Airport@802.11n/b/g@2.4ghz, is to run Airport@802.11n-only@5ghz. 802.11n-clients connect to this and this only. All 802.11g (or heaven forbid B) devices connect to an older or your existing 802.11b/g router. The magic part is bridging of some sort via ethernet so that the Airport@802.11n-only@5ghz network is seamlessly the same network as the 802.11b/g older crappier one.

Actually this works out well if you have an existing DSLmodem/router/wired/wireless Device (Let's call it OldDevice). As shown in Apple Manual:

DSL/Cable WAN is handled by OldDevice. OldDevice also feeds wired ethernet to one or to old computers. OldDevice serves up 802.11b/g to the non-N-enabled computers. For teh sexay new 802.11n@5ghz clients, they connect to the AirportExtreme at high speeds which then communicates with OldDevice (and hence Internet and other 802.11b/g wireless and wired computers) up to 100mbit/sec...



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post #80 of 106
Once you set up the AirportExtreme to 802.11n-only@5ghz wireless, then under Internet Access you bridge it to the OldDevice (dsl/cable/wirelessRoutercombo) as shown here:

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