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Mac OS X 10.4.9 to boost image import speeds

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
Apple this week dropped yet another pair of pre-release Mac OS X 10.4.9 builds on its developer crowd, inching the software closer to a public release.

The diligence with which the Cupertino-based company has been refining the software may signal that Mac OS X 10.4.9 will be the final maintenance update to Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger before attention is drawn solely to Leopard.

As was the case with prior seeds, developer notes accompanying the latest builds -- 8P2132 (Intel) and 8P132 (PowerPC) -- are said to reflect no known issues with the software.

People familiar with the latest pre-release say Apple notes just one significant change since builds 8P2130 and 8P130 were issued last week, specifically a bug fix to ImageIO that was affecting image import speeds.

Combo updates of Mac OS X 10.4.9, meaning those that can be applied to any Mac OS X 10.4.x installation, currently weigh in at 163.47 MB for PowerPC-based Macs and 315.45 for Intel-based Macs.

Come its release, Mac OS X 10.4.9 will represent the first update to Apple's Mac OS X operating system in nearly half a year. The last time the company offered a public update to its system software was in late September, with the release of Mac OS X 10.4.8.
post #2 of 25
The article doesn't elaborate on the import speeds mentioned in the headline, or mention it at all.
post #3 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

The article doesn't elaborate on the import speeds mentioned in the headline, or mention it at all.

The import speed was so fast, that whatever corresponded to the title got lost in the dust!
post #4 of 25
Anyone know if the kernel panic issue on Mac Pros with NVidia 7300GT and more than 2GB RAM installed has been fixed ?
post #5 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

The article doesn't elaborate on the import speeds mentioned in the headline, or mention it at all.

Uhh, yes, it does:

"People familiar with the latest pre-release say Apple notes just one significant change since builds 8P2130 and 8P130 were issued last week, specifically a bug fix to ImageIO that was affecting image import speeds."

 

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Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

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post #6 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bergermeister View Post

Uhh, yes, it does:

"People familiar with the latest pre-release say Apple notes just one significant change since builds 8P2130 and 8P130 were issued last week, specifically a bug fix to ImageIO that was affecting image import speeds."


OK, my mistake, I didn't see that. I tried scanning the article several times, I still think an article could provide more detail than that considering it yammers on about other things.
post #7 of 25
Always good news. Built in disk images is one of my favorite features in OSX (I love not having to put in the CD every time I want to play a game). Just make a cd master image and mount it on the desktop whenever you want to play.
post #8 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

OK, my mistake, I didn't see that. I tried scanning the article several times, I still think an article could provide more detail than that considering it yammers on about other things.

I am sure they report what they have without crossing Apple Legal. Good enough for me.
Hard-Core.
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post #9 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdj21ya View Post

Always good news. Built in disk images is one of my favorite features in OSX (I love not having to put in the CD every time I want to play a game). Just make a cd master image and mount it on the desktop whenever you want to play.

I had to look it up, but it looks like ImageIO is for photo-type images (gif, jpg, png, etc.), not disk images.
post #10 of 25
This must be the last 10.4. They are really taking their time to get it right.
post #11 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

This must be the last 10.4. They are really taking their time to get it right.

Yep. Timing is perfect for 10.5.

It's a shame MS seems to have such trouble getting things right, even after how many years of development...

post #12 of 25
Why is Intel much heavier than PPC when there are much more Mac models of the latter?

163.47 MB for PowerPC vs 315.45 MB for Intel.
post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by zunx View Post

Why is Intel much heavier than PPC when there are much more Mac models of the latter?

163.47 MB for PowerPC vs 315.45 MB for Intel.

Because Intel is Universal Binary (ie. includes both PPC and Intel)
post #14 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

OK, my mistake, I didn't see that. I tried scanning the article several times, I still think an article could provide more detail than that considering it yammers on about other things.

I would rather have AI not making whole articles based on single bug fixes.

All the seed notes says is: "Fixed issue with ImageIO and import speeds"

It doesn't even say if it's a fix for a bug in 10.4.8 or in a previous 10.4.9 seed.
JLL

95% percent of the boat is owned by Microsoft, but the 5% Apple controls happens to be the rudder!
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JLL

95% percent of the boat is owned by Microsoft, but the 5% Apple controls happens to be the rudder!
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post #15 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLL View Post

I would rather have AI not making whole articles based on single bug fixes.

All the seed notes says is: "Fixed issue with ImageIO and import speeds"

It doesn't even say if it's a fix for a bug in 10.4.8 or in a previous 10.4.9 seed.

Exactly. Claiming speeds will be boosted could be incorrect if the fix only relates to a bug introduced during 10.4.9 development.
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post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bergermeister View Post

Uhh, yes, it does:

"People familiar with the latest pre-release say Apple notes just one significant change since builds 8P2130 and 8P130 were issued last week, specifically a bug fix to ImageIO that was affecting image import speeds."

That doesn't say much.

How much of a change is there?

If it took 30 seconds to import a large image, and now it takes 25 seconds, I wouldn't be impressed by the improvement.

But, it it now took 15 seconds, I would.

And I agree about the source of the bugs. Sometimes they are old bugs, and sometimes they are newly created ones in the update process itself. It would be nice to know which they are.
post #17 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by zunx View Post

Why is Intel much heavier than PPC when there are much more Mac models of the latter?

163.47 MB for PowerPC vs 315.45 MB for Intel.

A great deal more has needed to be fixed in the Intel Mac OSX since its first release IMHO (I had a first release Intel Mac and it was nowhere near as bug free as the corresponding PPC OS X at the time). That and that update includes large updates to Rosetta which of course isn't included in the PPC update.
post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by dr_lha View Post

A great deal more has needed to be fixed in the Intel Mac OSX since its first release IMHO (I had a first release Intel Mac and it was nowhere near as bug free as the corresponding PPC OS X at the time). That and that update includes large updates to Rosetta which of course isn't included in the PPC update.

It definetly is not as stable, it just has 'more glitches' it seems. If I can stop from messing around with my system files on my G4 17" Powerbook for a few days I can just let Onyx do it's thing every week or so on my laptop and I never have to restart... I use it heavily too. The 17" MacBook Pro is a different story.
post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

This must be the last 10.4. They are really taking their time to get it right.

Now lets hope that when 10.5 comes out, Apple gives away 10.3 (at least) so that nobody has anything older than that. Or even a 10.5-lite (without time machine, spaces, or any of the top secret features)
post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregAlexander View Post

Now lets hope that when 10.5 comes out, Apple gives away 10.3 (at least) so that nobody has anything older than that. Or even a 10.5-lite (without time machine, spaces, or any of the top secret features)

That's actually in interesting idea. They should give versions older than two versions as a free download, or at least for a nominal cost, as you can buy them pretty cheaply on OWC, and some other sites, anyway.
post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

That doesn't say much.

How much of a change is there?

If it took 30 seconds to import a large image, and now it takes 25 seconds, I wouldn't be impressed by the improvement.

But, it it now took 15 seconds, I would.

And I agree about the source of the bugs. Sometimes they are old bugs, and sometimes they are newly created ones in the update process itself. It would be nice to know which they are.

You should be.

I realize this is all hypothetical, but a 17% performance boost in image loading is not bad. It's not great for loading one image, but if you're loading a web page with 100 images on it, you might see a 6-second load time drop to 5 seconds. Couple that with any other performance improvements the system may have, and you get Teh Snappy.
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post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by aegisdesign View Post

Because Intel is Universal Binary (ie. includes both PPC and Intel)

Nope. Intel is Intel only, but contains Rosetta...
post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogue27 View Post

I realize this is all hypothetical, but a 17% performance boost in image loading is not bad. It's not great for loading one image, but if you're loading a web page with 100 images on it, you might see a 6-second load time drop to 5 seconds. Couple that with any other performance improvements the system may have, and you get Teh Snappy.

Loading a web page with 100 images isn't limited by the image renderer, it has a differerent limiting factor - the Internet connection.
post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

Loading a web page with 100 images isn't limited by the image renderer, it has a differerent limiting factor - the Internet connection.

The text area I'm typing this message into has 18 smiley face icons to my right, 24 text editing icons above, and at least 10 images in the AppleInsider menu. All together, I see more than 50 images on my screen right now, and I doubt they are more than a 100k when you add them all together. The time to download them is barely perceptible, yet my browser is sluggish for a moment when loading this page.

When loading any page with lots of small images, the browser on my 400Mhz G3 will be sluggish and choppy when scrolling while the images are still loading. I've always assumed there must be some fixed overhead involved in starting to load each image because I do not have this problem when loading a page with small numbers of significantly larger images.

My impression is that the possible speed improvement would fix this situation.
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post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogue27 View Post

The text area I'm typing this message into has 18 smiley face icons to my right, 24 text editing icons above, and at least 10 images in the AppleInsider menu. All together, I see more than 50 images on my screen right now, and I doubt they are more than a 100k when you add them all together. The time to download them is barely perceptible, yet my browser is sluggish for a moment when loading this page.

When loading any page with lots of small images, the browser on my 400Mhz G3 will be sluggish and choppy when scrolling while the images are still loading. I've always assumed there must be some fixed overhead involved in starting to load each image because I do not have this problem when loading a page with small numbers of significantly larger images.

My impression is that the possible speed improvement would fix this situation.

That's because a good 40 of those images are smily, animated faces.

That has nothing to do with loading images. That has to do with lots and lots of animation timers going off. On the plus side, you could download a webkit nightly which has sped up multiple GIF animations by rolling all the timers into one.
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