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Google plays down phone rumors

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Google on Wednesday removed itself from the smartphone race, claiming that hardware wasn't its main concern.

Two executives from the world's largest search firm were keen to dampen expectations that it was creating its own device, in two separate instances clinging tightly to its mobile and Web initiatives.

"At this point in time, we are very focused on the software, not the phone," said Richard Kimber, who directs Google's southeast Asian sales and operations. Internet pioneer and Google evangelist Vint Cerf mirrored the statement earlier in March when he said that the company was more interested in building others' platforms.

Kimber elaborated by noting that the brunt of the company's efforts were dedicated towards integrating its search tools into existing mobile phones, rather than creating its own device.

The claim is bolstered by much of Google's efforts to date. The firm has recently signed deals with Samsung and other handset creators that have sought to pre-install mapping and Web search engines on their phones. Apple has been one of Google's highest-profile customers and secured the latter's help for both the iPhone's Safari web browser and a dedicated Google Maps utility.

Indeed, the statements primarily squelch rumors that would have most affected the iPhone if proven true. A commonly circulated image purportedly showed a device nicknamed the Switch that would have embraced the same touchscreen-only design philosophy as the Apple phone, drawing inevitable comparisons between the two communicators.

Purported photo of "Switch."

Such a competition would have also been uncharacteristic of Google, which has repeatedly shot down reports that it would produce hardware that challenges its own clients. Its only physical product to date is a blade server targeted at businesses that want hardware-based searching for their internal networks.

Vint Cerf was well aware of this historical foundation when he spoke to reporters in early March.

"Becoming an equipment manufacturer is pretty far from our business model," he said.
post #2 of 14
Apple played down getting into the phone business too.
post #3 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Such a competition would have also been uncharacteristic of Google, which has repeatedly shot down reports that it would produce hardware that challenges its own clients. Its only physical product to date is a blade server targeted at businesses that want hardware-based searching for their internal networks.

I don't know about blade server, I've only heard about a 1U search engine appliance, and I suspect that the writer misunderstand the standard use of the term of "blade server" in IT.
post #4 of 14
I wonder if "the Switch" is one of the iPhone working model given by Apple to external sources ? Since Google was on it, maybe some bystander thought it was a Google phone...
post #5 of 14
Google doesn't have any phone products in the market, and they are helping the iPhone through software, they aren't Apple's real competition. Apple's real competition are the Motorola's and the Palm's ect. of the phone world. In other news how the hell am I'm going to wait until October to see this iPhone in action. When Apple brings the iPhone to Europe they should quickly follow up with iPhone junior before November 2007 for all the teens who certianly wont be able to afford the iPhone.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #6 of 14
But, you must have noticed the wording of the statement:

Quote:
"At this point in time, we are very focused on the software, not the phone,"

Notice the use of "the" both times. He could have said:

"We are very focused on software, not on A phone."

The way he said it, leaves it open that they ARE working on "THE phone", and "THE software" for it, but that the main work at this time is being concentrated on the software, and that the phone is at a lower priority level until they know what the software feature set will be.

I'm not saying that they are working on a phone. But, the wording is curious, don't you think?
post #7 of 14
Quote:
the wording is curious, don't you think?

I too noticed that. Quite unsettling and very prominent.
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

But, you must have noticed the wording of the statement:



Notice the use of "the" both times. He could have said:

"We are very focused on software, not on A phone."

The way he said it, leaves it open that they ARE working on "THE phone", and "THE software" for it, but that the main work at this time is being concentrated on the software, and that the phone is at a lower priority level until they know what the software feature set will be.

I'm not saying that they are working on a phone. But, the wording is curious, don't you think?

Why are you getting so worked up about semantics? What's the difference?
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by wilco View Post

Why are you getting so worked up about semantics? What's the difference?

Ah, Wilco, do you know what "worked up" means? How is a bit of curiosity, and amusment, about an ambigious statement, being" worked up"?

The point to publishing articles is to garner comments, is it not?

Was my comment any worse, or less relevant, than your continued "poo"jokes?
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by wilco View Post

Why are you getting so worked up about semantics? What's the difference?

Semantics, matter.

Semantics matter.

post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

When Apple brings the iPhone to Europe they should quickly follow up with iPhone junior before November 2007 for all the teens who certianly wont be able to afford the iPhone.

And what features do you propose Apple cut from the iPhone? All three functions seem pretty important to its functionality in my opinion... probably the least important is the internet communicator...?

-Clive
My Mod: G4 Cube + Atom 330 CPU + Wiimote = Ultimate HTPC!
(Might I recommend the Libertarian Party as a good compromise between the equally terrible "DnR"?)
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My Mod: G4 Cube + Atom 330 CPU + Wiimote = Ultimate HTPC!
(Might I recommend the Libertarian Party as a good compromise between the equally terrible "DnR"?)
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post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clive At Five View Post

And what features do you propose Apple cut from the iPhone? All three functions seem pretty important to its functionality in my opinion... probably the least important is the internet communicator...?

-Clive

Yeah, that's a toughie. It's actually more difficult to figure out what features to remove, than to put in.
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clive At Five View Post

And what features do you propose Apple cut from the iPhone? All three functions seem pretty important to its functionality in my opinion... probably the least important is the internet communicator...?

-Clive

Well, make a phone without any of the other crap (itunes and communicator). Make a wide-screen ipod without the other crap (phone and communicator). Just keep the communicator (which, with iTunes loaded, could still play music) and lose the Phone (which, actually, is the crappiest part of the three that we've seen so far and would throw out the subscription service you need to pay for just to use the device).

Only Apple can get away with "Hey, we've got a group of people who want a phone, a group that wants a wide-screen ipod, and a group looking for a small computer/tablet. Rather then making three devices and sell to them all, let's combine it into one big and expensive device that only covers a very small subset of the people!"
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I don't know about blade server, I've only heard about a 1U search engine appliance, and I suspect that the writer misunderstand the standard use of the term of "blade server" in IT.

I saw one of these boxes a couple of years ago; my recollection is that it was 2U high. Looking at Google's product pages, a newer version of that is still available, along with the Google Mini , a 1U variant.

Blades generally show up in server rooms when many CPUs are required. Apparently some enterprises have enough web material or user searches to warrant multiple boxes, as seen in Google's GB-8008 model. No blade model seems available now, but it's probably only a matter of time.
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