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Adobe Creative Suite 3.0 bundles and Euro pricing revealed

post #1 of 71
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Exclusive: Adobe Systems Inc. will announce Tuesday that its highly-anticipated Creative Suite 3.0 software suite will be available in six distinct bundles with European pricing ranging from €999 to €2799, AppleInsider has learned.

Adobe Creative Suite Design Standard and Premium

A suite targeted towards media professionals will be called "Adobe Creative Suite 3.0 Design." It will be offered in both "Standard" and "Premium" bundles that fetch €1269 and €1999, respectively.

For print and publishing professionals, the "Standard" bundle will package InDesign 3.0, Photoshop CS3, Illustrator CS3 and Acrobat 8 Professional. The "Premium" version will be geared more towards cross-media and graphics designers, adding Flash CS3 Professional, Dreamweaver CS3, and swapping out Photoshop CS3 for Photoshop CS3 Extended.

Adobe Creative Suite Web Standard and Premium

The San Jose-based Adobe will also offer a pair of bundles specifically for Web developers as part of its "Adobe Creative Suite 3.0 Web" suite.

The "Standard," and most affordable of all six Creative Suite 3.0 bundles, will cost €999 and include Flash CS3 Professional, Dreamweaver CS3, Fireworks CS3, and Contribute CS3. A €1699 "Premium" package will also cater to web "designers," adding Photoshop CS3 Extended, Illustrator CS3, and Acrobat 8 Professional.

All Creative Suite 3.0 Web and Design suites, be it the Standard or Premium bundles, will also include Adobe Bridge CS3, Version Cue CS3, Device Central CS3, Stock Photos, and Acrobat Connect.

Adobe Creative Suite Production Premium

With film and video production professionals within its cross-hairs, Adobe also plans to roll out a €1999 suite called "Adobe Creative Suite 3.0 Production Premium." In addition to Photoshop CS3 Extended, Illustrator CS3, and Flash CS3 Professional, the package will include After Effects CS3 Professional, Premier Pro CS3, Soundbooth CS3, and Encore CS3.

Adobe Creative Suite Master Collection

For those pro users and institutions that want all Adobe has to offer, a €2799 "Adobe Creative Suite 3.0 Master Collection" will provide just that. It'll include InDesign CS3, Photoshop CS3 Extended, Illustrator CS3, Acrobat 8 Professional, Flash CS3 Professional, Dreamweaver CS3, Fireworks CS3, Contribute CS3, After Effects CS3 Professional, Premier Pro CS3, Soundbooth CS3, and Encore CS3.

Both the Production Premium and Master Collection suites will also come with Adobe Bridge CS3, Version Cue CS3, Device Central CS3, Stock Photos, Acrobat Connect, Dynamic Link, OnLocation CS3, and Ultra CS3. The only exception is the omission of Version Cue CS3 from the Production Premium bundle.

Most applications in the six-bundle release will be both Mac- and Windows-native, including all major components and their companion tools (Acrobat Connect, Bridge, Device Central, Dynamic Link, Stock Photos, and Version Cue). Only the Production Premium and Master Collection suites' video companion programs (OnLocation and Ultra) are limited to Windows systems.

Adobe plans to officially celebrate the global launch of Creative Suite 3.0 at a special event in New York City on Tuesday, March 27th. However, the software will not ship until sometime later this Spring.

Adobe Creative Suite 3.0 Software Bundles and Pricing (Euro) * DESIGN WEB PRODUCTION PREMIUM MASTER COLLECTION Standard Premium Standard Premium InDesign CS3 * * * Photoshop CS3 * Photoshop CS3 Extended * * * * Illustrator CS3 * * * * * Acrobat 8 Professional * * * * Flash CS3 Professional * * * * * Dreamweaver CS3 * * * * Fireworks CS3 * * * Contribute CS3 * * * After Effects CS3 Professional * * Premiere Pro CS3 * * Soundbooth CS3 * * Encore CS3 * * * Full price (Euro) €1,269 €1,999 €999 €1,699 €1,999 €2,799

Please note that European pricing tends to be much higher than U.S. pricing. Straight conversions from Euros to U.S. dollars are unlikely to yield actual U.S. pricing.
post #2 of 71
I sure hope they have a great upgrade deal when this starts shipping.
From Macromedia stuff and Adobe stuff...
post #3 of 71
So converting to U.S. dollars, it ranges from about $1300 to $3600. If the prices are relatively consistent from country to country, that would be a bit of a hike from the present packages. CS2 Standard is what...$900?
post #4 of 71
So is ImageReady being replaced by Fireworks?

All I really need is Dreamweaver and ImageReady (or Photoshop). Are they really going to try to push Contribute, Flash, and Fireworks down my throat?
post #5 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idle View Post

So converting to U.S. dollars, it ranges from about $1300 to $3600. If the prices are relatively consistent from country to country, that would be a bit of a hike from the present packages. CS2 Standard is what...$900?

Clearly Adobe is trying to push everyone to using open source software like Gimp. I've already gotten rid of their stupendously expensive products for my personal projects, replacing them with shareware and freeware (ImageWell, Gimp, YummyFTP, and SeaMonkey are a good place to start).

It is really stunning that they think that they have that much better of a value proposition to offer. I like the ability to select code fragments in Dreamweaver, but I'm going to be hard pressed to justify an upgrade at that pricepoint.
post #6 of 71
Gee, 999 euro is outrageously expensive in our time of $25 shareware titles. I was half-hoping they'd lower it to at least eur 500, so it would be affordable, but NO.
post #7 of 71
Perhaps theyre just trying to cover the cost of buying Macromedia. I hope that they will still have the education version.
post #8 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idle View Post

So converting to U.S. dollars, it ranges from about $1300 to $3600. If the prices are relatively consistent from country to country, that would be a bit of a hike from the present packages. CS2 Standard is what...$900?

Yeah right now CS2 is $899 for standard and $1199 for premium 2.3. If the upgrade price increases use the same ratio that the full versions do, then upgrades should start at $230 and get as high as $500.

I have CS2 Premium and if my upgrade price is $230 I will go ahead and bite the bullet, but I will take a long, hard look at anything that costs me $500 or more. I might opt for buying upgrades to Illy and PS and to hell with the rest. Or maybe just Illy if the Adobe gets too greedy. I need Illy and I really want PhotoShop, but the others I can get by without.



Quote:
Originally Posted by TheToe View Post

So is ImageReady being replaced by Fireworks?

All I really need is Dreamweaver and ImageReady (or Photoshop). Are they really going to try to push Contribute, Flash, and Fireworks down my throat?

I saw somewhere (can't remember now) that ImageReady is dead. Fireworks will be the new prep for web app in the suite.
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post #9 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idle View Post

So converting to U.S. dollars, it ranges from about $1300 to $3600. If the prices are relatively consistent from country to country, that would be a bit of a hike from the present packages. CS2 Standard is what...$900?

No doubt you guys in dollar land will (as always) end up paying less for any US sourced software. When are these greedy idiots whose lives are driven by accountants realise that fair pricing in all countries (not just the US) will go a long way to cutting down piracy. No wonder people copy when the cost per unit starts to hit 4 digits. Europe always gets ripped off more (we all get ripped off) even for hardware (compare Apple prices) and all this rubbish about market forces etc is only marketing speak for we don't give a damn. Oh how nice it would be to get a real reply from someone at Adobe who really cares...
post #10 of 71
1- euhm, no Director MX 2007? It should have been included in the Design Premium edition i/o Flash & Dreamweaver. Wanna make a web site, go for the Web Edition.

2- Also Adobe CS Design Premium and Adobe CS Web Standard are very confusing?! Don't you allready have the basics of Web with the Design Premium? The Web Standard edition does seem a little bit crippled without photoshop (extended) and illustrator.

3- I wonder what Photoshop extended means!? Is it just a snappy way to say Photoshop and Imageready?!


Hmmm, probably settling with a Design Standard Edition.
post #11 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheToe View Post

Clearly Adobe is trying to push everyone to using open source software like Gimp. I've already gotten rid of their stupendously expensive products for my personal projects, replacing them with shareware and freeware (ImageWell, Gimp, YummyFTP, and SeaMonkey are a good place to start).

It is really stunning that they think that they have that much better of a value proposition to offer. I like the ability to select code fragments in Dreamweaver, but I'm going to be hard pressed to justify an upgrade at that pricepoint.

Because $1000 is SO expensive for graphic design firms raking in millions a year.

Photoshop makes people money. They're glad to have it.

GIMP can't compete in the professional arena. You get what you pay for.
post #12 of 71
When Adobe started to offer their collections, I already owned all of the software included. Initially, they didn't upgrade together. Then they started pushing their collections, and offered an upgrade path from Photoshop. I found this to be incorrect. Since I already owned all, I argued that I should not have to pay as much as people having only a Photoshop licence.
As it turned out, after some back and forth with Adobe, they did not agree.

Now I am in a situation where I own the CS2 collection, the Macromedia 8 bundle, and After Effects Professional.
I hope Adobe will present a fair upgrade path for people like myself.
I hope history will not repeat itself.

Mark
post #13 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr O View Post

I wonder what Photoshop extended means!? Is it just a snappy way to say Photoshop and Imageready?!


Extended has new features which are designed for 3D rendering, architectural conceptual presentations and other virtualization stuff as well as video painting and cloning across multiple frames.

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post #14 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by HandMade Monster View Post

Now I am in a situation where I own the CS2 collection, the Macromedia 8 bundle, and After Effects Professional.

Yep, I in the same boat.
m

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post #15 of 71
At those prices they better makes those apps seriously sing and dance. What I've seen so far does not imply the profound upgrade Adobe is pricing for here.

And, so, the reduced piracy from that activation crap? Reduced prices for the consumer has it?

F-ing muppets.
post #16 of 71
creative suite 2 is $1200
studio 8 is $1000

the adobe web bundle NOW is $1900, and has NO video editing software
the adobe video bundle NOW is $2100, and does NOT include InDesign or Dreamweaver.

the prices listed aren't crazy.
post #17 of 71
Any word on a USB dongle a la Logic?

I heard rumors of that a while back, and now I guess it makes sense since they're not combating piracy with low prices...
post #18 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregmightdothat View Post

Because $1000 is SO expensive for graphic design firms raking in millions a year.

Photoshop makes people money. They're glad to have it.

GIMP can't compete in the professional arena. You get what you pay for.

I agree that big design firms can handle it, but solo freelance designers are going to seriously evaluate alternatives before forking out that much cash. And casual designers (ie, for hobbies, personal projects, nonprofits, etc.) who might have used Photoshop or Dreamweaver in the past are going to be much less likely to buy an Adobe product as the price climbs.

As for getting what you pay for, I very much disagree. Linux, Firefox, Apache, Asterisk, MySQL, PHP, SugarCRM, and so on and so on and so on are absolutely free and absolutely top-notch... Gimp just needs to get into these guys' league. And Adobe's rape-pricing is going to be a BIG help there.
post #19 of 71
I never paid for Adobe-Software. These Prices won't make me a costumer, either.
2799.- for Software?! They are crazy, I can get GIMP for free, and there isn't much it can't do what PS can.
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post #20 of 71
SIX bundles? Adobe is clearly jealous of Microsoft's Vista packaging.

RIP GoLive. It was fun while it lasted.
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post #21 of 71
So it would appear that ImageReady is dead and apparantly replaced with Fireworks.

I have a problem with that.

ImageReady was bundled with Photoshop previously, and I used it for converting my Photoshop designs into webpages. Now Fireworks doesn't come in the Design Bundle, not even the Premium version. Why would the premium version bundle Dreamweaver and not Fireworks? I cant even move to the Web Bundle because it lacks InDesign.

So now it looks like I have to buy the Design Premium bundle and add Fireworks as a separate purchase. And I too have separate purchases of Flash and Dreamweaver... this is going to be a costly upgrade.
post #22 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denmaru View Post

I never paid for Adobe-Software. These Prices won't make me a costumer, either.
2799.- for Software?! They are crazy, I can get GIMP for free, and there isn't much it can't do what PS can.

GIMP does not compare to Photoshop. A professional user familiar with both programs would understand that. It is also quite illogical to compare GIMP to the $2,799 price tag, which bundles a hoard of excellent Adobe products used for a wide array of purposes. Best to stick to Photoshop vs. GIMP comparisons. That said, for someone using Photoshop professionally, the price tag attached to Photoshop is nothing horrible. It can easily be made up in a single job, or in two jobs for less established professionals. For these professionals, the benefits of Photoshop on the Intel platform will by far outweigh the costs. For other professionals, they may not, and they will do what they always do—skip a version of Adobe’s packages and upgrade on a future release. They don’t need to upgrade every single time.

The prices are steep from a home user’s perspective, but people don’t have to use Adobe products, nor do they have a right to as some pirates and computer users seem to believe they do. If a person wants Photoshop to edit their family photos and those funny graphics they upload to the internet they may be overshooting the cost vs. benefit ratio. They are buying a fancy expensive toy (which is fine if that’s what they like). If they are a professional the costs of Adobe products are often-times quite reasonable. People get to decide on a case by case basis.

And finally, I’ll draw a comparison. Final Cut Pro—a very expensive piece of software—is a marvelous bargain for what it does. It really is. Apple has taken prices in the video industry, in many areas, and thrown them to the curb as competition scrambles to compete with them. But Final Cut Pro is not the solution for someone who wants to edit their home movies (unless they enjoy a premium experience and don’t mind paying a premium price). For these folk, Apple has released iLife. For the Adobe folk, Adobe has released Photoshop Elements for $99.
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post #23 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheToe View Post

I agree that big design firms can handle it, but solo freelance designers are going to seriously evaluate alternatives before forking out that much cash. And casual designers (ie, for hobbies, personal projects, nonprofits, etc.) who might have used Photoshop or Dreamweaver in the past are going to be much less likely to buy an Adobe product as the price climbs.

As for getting what you pay for, I very much disagree. Linux, Firefox, Apache, Asterisk, MySQL, PHP, SugarCRM, and so on and so on and so on are absolutely free and absolutely top-notch... Gimp just needs to get into these guys' league. And Adobe's rape-pricing is going to be a BIG help there.

Freelance designers can charge upwards of $100 an hour. If Photoshop can save them just 5 hours, over the 18 months until CS4, then Photoshop is more cost-effective than the GIMP. The much better designed Photoshop probably saves them 2 or 3 hours a day, given GIMP an opportunity cost of $75,000 or more over an 18 month period. $500 upgrade, or $75,000 in lost time... who will win?

More to the point, assuming they need even one feature that the GIMP doesn't have, like say, 16-bit color, then they need to use Photoshop instead.

Your logic is that of a high school student, not of a serious professional.
post #24 of 71
That is a lot of money, but then again, it isn't.

If it's a problem, then expect that a lot of CS2 for Windows users would probably hold back until CS4 unless it's a really compelling upgrade. Mac users are almost going to have to upgrade if they have Intel hardware, then they might want to wait until CS5 to upgrade.

But I'd think anyone that's seriously using this software can easily pay for it and it's easily justifiable, even the freelancers.

Hobbyists can find alternatives, and that's fine for hobbyist use. To me, none of the FOSS drawing tools mentioned in this thread are anywhere close, I've tried them and I think they generally need invasive surgery, and I'm not even much of a graphics guy. On my PC, I only have Photoshop 5 SE, on Mac, Elements 3 and for me, they are a lot better than the FOSS packages that I've tried.

Adobe is only in trouble when businesses quit buying their products because that's where the money really is. It's a drop in the bucket for pros of any stripe, amateurs really aren't their market anymore except with their Elements products.
post #25 of 71
I don't think the price is unreasonable for professionals. There is this thing called inflation where prices go up on everything eventually. Compare these prices to what you paid for these products ten years ago (except PageMaker insted of InDesign) and it isn't that substantial compared to many other things (including what we charge for ads).

The only thing that sucks for me is that I really must have it on my MacBook Pro and convincing the boss to buy me two copies isn't eas. It is really high priced for me to buy personally. I guess when I know I am going to need it on my laptop, I can deactivate it on my work computer. That will get old really fast.
post #26 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregmightdothat View Post

Freelance designers can charge upwards of $100 an hour. If Photoshop can save them just 5 hours, over the 18 months until CS4, then Photoshop is more cost-effective than the GIMP. The much better designed Photoshop probably saves them 2 or 3 hours a day, given GIMP an opportunity cost of $75,000 or more over an 18 month period. $500 upgrade, or $75,000 in lost time... who will win?

More to the point, assuming they need even one feature that the GIMP doesn't have, like say, 16-bit color, then they need to use Photoshop instead.

Your logic is that of a high school student, not of a serious professional.

exactly. i'm looking to upgrade to the design premium or whatever. if it's less than $500 it's a no brainer. i'll make it up in less than a day. if the upgrade prices are good i might go for a higher level bundle.
post #27 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnnyKrz View Post

I don't think the price is unreasonable for professionals. There is this thing called inflation where prices go up on everything eventually. Compare these prices to what you paid for these products ten years ago (except PageMaker insted of InDesign) and it isn't that substantial compared to many other things (including what we charge for ads).

The only thing that sucks for me is that I really must have it on my MacBook Pro and convincing the boss to buy me two copies isn't eas. It is really high priced for me to buy personally. I guess when I know I am going to need it on my laptop, I can deactivate it on my work computer. That will get old really fast.

Unless they change the EULA you are allowed to install CS on two computers and use it on both as long as they are not being used simultaneously, or by different users. It was designed that way so that you could do exactly what you want to do: use it on a desktop and a laptop.

Check your EULA, it should say that this is a legal use of the software. This is a frequent topic on the Adobe forums BTW.

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post #28 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

That is a lot of money, but then again, it isn't.

If it's a problem, then expect that a lot of CS2 for Windows users would probably hold back until CS4 unless it's a really compelling upgrade. Mac users are almost going to have to upgrade if they have Intel hardware, then they might want to wait until CS5 to upgrade.

But I'd think anyone that's seriously using this software can easily pay for it and it's easily justifiable, even the freelancers.

Hobbyists can find alternatives, and that's fine for hobbyist use. To me, none of the FOSS drawing tools mentioned in this thread are anywhere close, I've tried them and I think they generally need invasive surgery, and I'm not even much of a graphics guy. On my PC, I only have Photoshop 5 SE, on Mac, Elements 3 and for me, they are a lot better than the FOSS packages that I've tried.

Adobe is only in trouble when businesses quit buying their products because that's where the money really is. It's a drop in the bucket for pros of any stripe, amateurs really aren't their market anymore except with their Elements products.

Thing is though, that leaving an opening for consumers opens you up to being attacked from underneath.

While they own the market today by swallowing Macromedia, there are a number of tools out there that could scale fairly quickly to tackle the Adobe juggernaut.

Quark is still alive and innovating fast. Lineform has promise, even if it lacks a few features.
Apple's consumer focus with iPhoto and iWeb could convince them to add pro versions relatively quickly. Freeway is still out there.

It will be interesting to see the upgrade price of Photoshop next week. That, more than anything else, will say whether Adobe thinks it can get away with near-monopoly status, or if it will continue to keep prices low enough to squelch potential competition.
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post #29 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank777 View Post

Thing is though, that leaving an opening for consumers opens you up to being attacked from underneath.

This isn't consumer software. Adobe does offer some fairly nice consumer level software at a very reasonable price, though some of it is Windows-only, Macs include rudimentary video authoring tools in the box. I'm guessing that students will probably still have very good discounts for the pro level software.

Quote:
While they own the market today by swallowing Macromedia, there are a number of tools out there that could scale fairly quickly to tackle the Adobe juggernaut.

As nice as that would be, I don't think it is very easy or fast.
post #30 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

The CS3 software aren't consumer programs. Adobe does offer some fairly nice consumer level software at a very reasonable price, though some of it is Windows-only, Macs include rudimentary video authoring tools in the package. I'm guessing that students will probably still have very good discounts for the pro level software.



As nice as that would be, I don't think it is very easy or fast.


I never said CS3 was geared to consumers. My point was that if the consumer market was left largely to others, Adobe could eventually suffer as those programs pushed into Pro territory.

Look at where iPhoto started and where it is now. After six years, Apple has to make a conscious effort to avoid trampling on Adobe's territory.

I think Quark, Freeway and Lineform, can scale much in the same way. None of those are tied to Adobe's single code solution, so they will make great strides every time Apple upgrades Mac OS.

And by fast, I don't mean months. Adobe's development schedule is 18 months, so we're always talking years in terms of competition.
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post #31 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregmightdothat View Post

Freelance designers can charge upwards of $100 an hour.

Yeah, right. What about countries where reaching such earnings is practically impossible and average salary is about $930?
post #32 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xian Zhu Xuande View Post

For other professionals, they may not, and they will do what they always doskip a version of Adobes packages and upgrade on a future release. They dont need to upgrade every single time.

Except that current Adobe products and Macromedia products are really not much fun at all on Rosetta.

Leapfrogging software is often also done against leapfrogging computers, but now... buy a new Mac and you almost have to upgrade to CS3. If you're trying to be a serious designer.
post #33 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregmightdothat View Post

Freelance designers can charge upwards of $100 an hour. If Photoshop can save them just 5 hours, over the 18 months until CS4, then Photoshop is more cost-effective than the GIMP. The much better designed Photoshop probably saves them 2 or 3 hours a day, given GIMP an opportunity cost of $75,000 or more over an 18 month period. $500 upgrade, or $75,000 in lost time... who will win?

More to the point, assuming they need even one feature that the GIMP doesn't have, like say, 16-bit color, then they need to use Photoshop instead.

Your logic is that of a high school student, not of a serious professional.

Not all freelance designers get $100/hour, nor do they all have a lot of hours of work. Temps get more like $15-20 an hour, before taxes. Those are the people trying to get their first gig, and they need good tools to be able to do it, and they most certainly do not have thousands to throw around. They can try to steal time, resources, and even software from the companies they're working for, but... that's not really cool.

So, yes... my logic is that of someone recently out of high school... that's the people I was describing, along with people who aren't professional designers. (But actually, I've was a graphics professional from System 7 to OS X. There's no reason to take that tone.)
post #34 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheToe View Post

buy a new Mac and you almost have to upgrade to CS3. If you're trying to be a serious designer.

I'm in exact position. Now what? It seems I was an idiot because I bought a mac?
post #35 of 71
By the way, for those who feel GIMP isn't up to the quality level of Photoshop... just a reminder that you don't have to be a programmer to contribute to an open source project.

Here's how you can help the gimp:
http://gimp.org/develop/
post #36 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by and View Post

I'm in exact position. Now what? It seems I was an idiot because I bought a mac?

Vista users are in much the same position: CS 2 is not supported on Vista. If you want Vista and Adobe CS apps you must upgrade to CS 3.

Adobe gets us all this time around...unless you're using a pre-Intel Mac or are content to stay with Win XP.

So they get my money.

And as far as this freelance illustrator goes, $100/hour sounds great! You can pay me that anytime you want.
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post #37 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by and View Post

Yeah, right. What about countries where reaching such earnings is practically impossible and average salary is about $930?

You aren't serious, are you?

In countries like China, graphic designers get paid way, way above average.

In other places with less commerce, there isn't graphic design. Period. Or electricity, or things of that nature.
post #38 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregmightdothat View Post

You aren't serious, are you?

In countries like China, graphic designers get paid way, way above average.

In other places with less commerce, there isn't graphic design. Period. Or electricity, or things of that nature.

Not quite. I'm talking about middle-Europe countries like Poland, Hungary or Czech Republic. These countries are still developing and to develop they need tools. Saying that in these countries there is no graphic design is some kind of ignorance. Sure there are companies that can afford this (I mean CS3) with no problem, but average salary in this industry is about $20-25 per hour. Now CS2 Premium (localized version) costs here about 1000 euro - and that's ok. I'm 22 and I'm starting in this business. Hardware and software for one designer/developer is 1 300 euro for a new iMac 20" and 1699 euro for CS3 Web Premium.

Besides you're in better position living in the US than in Europe. Everything form the US here is much more expensive.
post #39 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheToe View Post

Not all freelance designers get $100/hour, nor do they all have a lot of hours of work. Temps get more like $15-20 an hour, before taxes.

Temps aren't freelancers. They'll have Photoshop provided for them by the firm that hires them.

Quote:
Those are the people trying to get their first gig, and they need good tools to be able to do it, and they most certainly do not have thousands to throw around.

There's this thing called 'college.' And a corollary called 'academic discount.'

Photoshop is affordably priced for both professionals and for students.

But you're rightfor someone looking for their first job, the GIMP and other free/cheap software packages are great ways to build a portfolio.

But if Adobe lowered Photoshop's price to please this fragment of the market, they'd likely price themselves out of business.

Quote:
So, yes... my logic is that of someone recently out of high school... that's the people I was describing, along with people who aren't professional designers. (But actually, I've was a graphics professional from System 7 to OS X. There's no reason to take that tone.)

Sorry, I didn't mean it insultingly, but often high school students don't understand concepts like opportunity costs.
post #40 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by and View Post

Not quite. I'm talking about middle-Europe countries like Poland, Hungary or Czech Republic. These countries are still developing and to develop they need tools. Saying that in these countries there is no graphic design is some kind of ignorance. Sure there are companies that can afford this (I mean CS3) with no problem, but average salary in this industry is about $20-25 per hour. Now CS2 Premium (localized version) costs here about 1000 euro - and that's ok. I'm 22 and I'm starting in this business. Hardware and software for one designer/developer is 1 300 euro for a new iMac 20" and 1699 euro for CS3 Web Premium.

$20-25 is exactly what the starting salary is here for graphic design, although I don't know if you meant US dollars or not. It goes up to maybe $30-40, but only really good designers will go any higher. You're not that worse off from us.

Quote:
Besides you're in better position living in the US than in Europe. Everything form the US here is much more expensive.

That's mostly because of VATs. We have taxes too, we just add them to the price, rather then including them in the price. For example, a product that is advertised as $1,000 will be sold for between $1,050 and $1,100 depending on the sales tax in your state.

It's not Adobe's fault that European countries charge 15-25% on VATs
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AppleInsider › Forums › Software › Mac Software › Adobe Creative Suite 3.0 bundles and Euro pricing revealed