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Mac Blu-Ray notebook upgrade shows Apple lagging behind - Page 3

post #81 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell View Post

I'm not disagreeing with you that Apple should add Blu-ray and HD-DVD support. We should see full support come April 15th. I would be extremely shocked if we didn't. I'm just saying that the majority of people who use FCS have not had a need for it.

I think the same can be legitimately said for an eight core computer, but for some reason, Apple is offering that.
post #82 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell View Post

That may be but for the most part major studios are not really FCS primary market. I guarantee any high end company that maybe using DVDSP is also using a lot of proprietary software and plug ins.

There are whole business devoted to DVD compression. Most of these companies use proprietary DVD compression software and have a compression specialist who will figure out how to get all of the content on the disk with the least amount of artifacts and the best quality picture.

I've been to Technicolor and seen how they make DVD's. This is the type of service most of the studios are using. Technicolor Content Services

Good link! Thanks.
post #83 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I can't get more than a handful of HD channels from my cable company, yet I have several hundred in SD, but somehow it has obsolesced?

Cable, satellite and terrestrial broadcasters are atill primarily using the NTSC (or PAL) SD single. HD content for many satellite and cable companies is an additional fee, not the default package. Once HD becomes the standard and broadcasters stop supporting NTSC (or PAL) then SD will be obsolete.

As for people who own HD set, I personally know of at least a dozen homes that have HD sets and they all have at least two other SD sets in use. Besides that I can think of many more homes that only have SD sets in use.

I have no doubt that SD and CRT will go the way of the dodo, but that day has not come yet nor will it for many years to come.

When broadcasters stop transmitting in SD, and only then, will it have become obsolete. But that won't happen until the install base of HD sets is greater than SD sets.

Again its not just SD its not just CRT TV's its SD CRT TV's I said were obsolete, and truth is they are. Simple fact would you plan your home theater around a SD TV, would you go out and spend $1000+ on a large SD CRT TV, the answer to both is of course not, why well you get the point, end game.

Now if you cant get more than a handful of HD channels truth is its time to change cable co. or get sat.
post #84 of 109
The people saying that consumers don't need to have Blu-Ray drives in their Macs yet are only partially right -- there is not a huge demand to watch 1080p movies on Macs -- but there is a great need for large capacity removable disks for backing up files.

All of the parents I know that have digital cameras have have at least 30 - 100 GB of pictures, and their library contenues to grow every year ( I just backed up my sister's photos, she does not use her camera much, but over the past 5 years she has gathered 50 GB worth of photos). And that is just digital pictures, when you take video into account the desire for larger capacity removable media skyrockets.

The consumer's needs for digital storage has grown at a fantastic rate, and hard drives have been keeping up (you can buy 250GB external drives for under $100), but removable backup media has fallen far behind: it takes nearly 30 dual layer DVDs to back up just one 250GB disk. While in the long run holographic disks with their multiple terabyte capacity will probably be the solution, it will be 3-5 years before they become cheap enough for consumers. Until holographic disks become a viable option, Blue-Ray's 50 GB capacity will do a lot to ease the problem of backing up the consumer's ever growing collections of pictures and home movies.
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post #85 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Res View Post

The people saying that consumers don't need to have Blu-Ray drives in their Macs yet are only partially right -- there is not a huge demand to watch 1080p movies on Macs -- but there is a great need for large capacity removable disks for backing up files.

All of the parents I know that have digital cameras have have at least 30 - 100 GB of pictures, and their library contenues to grow every year ( I just backed up my sister's photos, she does not use her camera much, but over the past 5 years she has gathered 50 GB worth of photos). And that is just digital pictures, when you take video into account the desire for larger capacity removable media skyrockets.

The consumer's needs for digital storage has grown at a fantastic rate, and hard drives have been keeping up (you can buy 250GB external drives for under $100), but removable backup media has fallen far behind: it takes nearly 30 dual layer DVDs to back up just one 250GB disk. While in the long run holographic disks with their multiple terabyte capacity will probably be the solution, it will be 3-5 years before they become cheap enough for consumers. Until holographic disks become a viable option, Blue-Ray's 50 GB capacity will do a lot to ease the problem of backing up the consumer's ever growing collections of pictures and home movies.

Actually, you have just posed the dilemma of these discs. They are sufficiently large to be of use for some things, but too large to be used routinely because you wind up with a lot of wasted, and expensive, disc space or wind up with too many separate "drives" on a single disc to efficiently organize or search for particular items. At the present time it seems clear that external hard drives (which can be secured in a fire safe or other secure area) and CDs/DVDs for the second backup for data that is truly important.

In my opinion, using either HD format discs would be entirely impractical for routine backup at the present time.Will this always be the case? Who knows?
post #86 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Res View Post

The people saying that consumers don't need to have Blu-Ray drives in their Macs yet are only partially right -- there is not a huge demand to watch 1080p movies on Macs -- but there is a great need for large capacity removable disks for backing up files.

All of the parents I know that have digital cameras have have at least 30 - 100 GB of pictures, and their library contenues to grow every year ( I just backed up my sister's photos, she does not use her camera much, but over the past 5 years she has gathered 50 GB worth of photos). And that is just digital pictures, when you take video into account the desire for larger capacity removable media skyrockets.

The consumer's needs for digital storage has grown at a fantastic rate, and hard drives have been keeping up (you can buy 250GB external drives for under $100), but removable backup media has fallen far behind: it takes nearly 30 dual layer DVDs to back up just one 250GB disk. While in the long run holographic disks with their multiple terabyte capacity will probably be the solution, it will be 3-5 years before they become cheap enough for consumers. Until holographic disks become a viable option, Blue-Ray's 50 GB capacity will do a lot to ease the problem of backing up the consumer's ever growing collections of pictures and home movies.

It is the much better argument, but I still dont see the need or the hassle to have to do it on disc, whatever the capacity, I'd much rather store pics or anything on one hard drive thats accessible via my Air Port by all computers/media devices in my house, and ultimately available over the internet to me anywhere. Discs (whatever format or size) have physical limitations I just dont think we need to put up with in future storage devices, when we dont even have to with todays.
post #87 of 109
true true
post #88 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by RBR View Post

Actually, you have just posed the dilemma of these discs. They are sufficiently large to be of use for some things, but too large to be used routinely because you wind up with a lot of wasted, and expensive, disc space or wind up with too many separate "drives" on a single disc to efficiently organize or search for particular items. At the present time it seems clear that external hard drives (which can be secured in a fire safe or other secure area) and CDs/DVDs for the second backup for data that is truly important.

In my opinion, using either HD format discs would be entirely impractical for routine backup at the present time.Will this always be the case? Who knows?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Judgegavel View Post

It is the much better argument, but I still dont see the need or the hassle to have to do it on disc, whatever the capacity, I'd much rather store pics or anything on one hard drive thats accessible via my Air Port by all computers/media devices in my house, and ultimately available over the internet to me anywhere. Discs (whatever format or size) have physical limitations I just dont think we need to put up with in future storage devices, when we dont even have to with todays.

I agree that you want to store your files on a hard disk for daily use, but the problem with hard drives is that they are guaranteed to fail, so you need a method to back up all your files. Some people, myself included, use extra hard drives for backup, but sooner or later you will experience a multi-drive failure, and if you have not backed up your digital pictures and other irreplaceable files to some sort of removable media, you will lose them. Consumers need a cheap and reliable way to back up their ever growing digital media files: hard drives are unreliable, DVDs way too small, and Holographic Drives are too expensive for the next few years. That leaves us with Blue-Ray 50GB disks as the best bet for consumer backup media until the next decade rolls around.
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post #89 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by i386 View Post

I reckon Apple are hanging on until a dual format unit exists that supports both HD-DVD and Blu-Ray, it kinda fits into their way of thinking - Super Drive II or something along these lines.

I also think Apple's gonna choose a dual drive, it would be the best consumer choise since Microsoft won't give up over the PS3 Blu-Ray install base. But what's the rush.. the iTunes store will have more movies to offer than either BR or HD-DVD will offer for some time. I bet Apple will try and push people in that direction initially. Not that they're HD but.. it's all ready for HD, and the Apple TV plays 720p. I bet Apple will introduce their first HD downloads when iTunes movie store is introduced in Europe later this year.
post #90 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Judgegavel View Post

LOL, and I'm sure not one of them own a Mac (jking). While I understand standard def. CRT TV's are by far dominant in existence, they are at this point obsolete. I personally know no-one under the age of 40 that does not own at least one HD TV.

Still any disc technology is yesterdays, it doesn't matter in five years no-one will be buying either, it reminds me of when all the talk was of how MD's were going to be the next step in music storage, just before the iPod took over the music industry and we learned we didnt need any disc storage (for music).

I better go check my birth certificate again...I must be older than I think because I don't own an HDTV yet (not that I don't want one but the only realistic reason to buy on is for Blu-Ray or HD-DVD considering the very limited broadcast/cable/satellite HD content).

As someone else said, the only people I know with HDTV's are 40+ and only one of them actually watches HD content on it.

As for discs going away in the next five years, good luck with that one. Maybe I really am older than I believe, because I don't want to ever give up owning a physical copy of my media, whether it be music, movies, or computer programs. I don't relish perpetually rebuying media via VOD or iTunes or whatever other method comes along and knowing it could be taken away in an instant.
post #91 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Res View Post

I agree that you want to store your files on a hard disk for daily use, but the problem with hard drives is that they are guaranteed to fail, so you need a method to back up all your files. Some people, myself included, use extra hard drives for backup, but sooner or later you will experience a multi-drive failure, and if you have not backed up your digital pictures and other irreplaceable files to some sort of removable media, you will lose them. Consumers need a cheap and reliable way to back up their ever growing digital media files: hard drives are unreliable, DVDs way too small, and Holographic Drives are too expensive for the next few years. That leaves us with Blue-Ray 50GB disks as the best bet for consumer backup media until the next decade rolls around.

It is just not cost effective at the present time. Try two (or more) or more hard drives and DVDs for archiving pix. 8 GB on dual layer DVDs (for under $2 a disc) isn't that bad.

Here is an article about the poor Blu-Ray/HD-DVD sales. http://www.highdefdigest.com/news/show/564
post #92 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by caliminius View Post

I better go check my birth certificate again...I must be older than I think because I don't own an HDTV yet (not that I don't want one but the only realistic reason to buy on is for Blu-Ray or HD-DVD considering the very limited broadcast/cable/satellite HD content).

As someone else said, the only people I know with HDTV's are 40+ and only one of them actually watches HD content on it.

As for discs going away in the next five years, good luck with that one. Maybe I really am older than I believe, because I don't want to ever give up owning a physical copy of my media, whether it be music, movies, or computer programs. I don't relish perpetually rebuying media via VOD or iTunes or whatever other method comes along and knowing it could be taken away in an instant.

Limited broadcast? I own two TV's both are HD and I have DirecTV, 90% of my new TV viewing is in HD, all the major networks, HBO, Showtime, and all sports I watch are broadcast in HD so I just dont see where its limited. Yes I do have to put up with the minor networks still being in SD but I really dont care if the Scrubs rerun I've seen 5x is, and by the end of the year when DirecTV adds another 50 HD channels I doubt I'll be watching anything in SD.

As for discs, I doubt they will totally go away in five years, after-all you can still get VCR and cassette tapes, hell you can even find 8 tracks if you look hard enough. But the obvious trend in the Music industry is that the CD is going the way of the Dodo,(look at the number of record stores that have gone out of business the last 5 years). Its not because of space limitations or quality its because the physical disc is an unneeded hassle at this point, any disc be it HD or Blu-ray has the same problem. The future is in icreasing download speed and hard drive space, not the latest technology in a dying media (the Disc).
post #93 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Judgegavel View Post

Again its not just SD its not just CRT TV's its SD CRT TV's I said were obsolete, and truth is they are. Simple fact would you plan your home theater around a SD TV, would you go out and spend $1000+ on a large SD CRT TV, the answer to both is of course not, why well you get the point, end game.

Are you really that obtuse? Why do brand spankin' new HD sets support NTSC? Could it possibly be because almost all station still broadcast in it and most Americans still use it?

If you had stated that SD CRTs are being made obsolete by lowering prices of HD flat-panels, or that a government mandated timeframe requiring broadcasters to switch to HD is obsolescing SD CRTs.
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post #94 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Judgegavel View Post

But the obvious trend in the Music industry is that the CD is going the way of the Dodo,(look at the number of record stores that have gone out of business the last 5 years). Its not because of space limitations or quality its because the physical disc is an unneeded hassle at this point

The number one reason record stores are going out of business is because mega-centers are undercutting them.
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post #95 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

Even if Apple offered a Blu-Ray or HD-DVD drive built-in, their Cinema Displays would be unable to play movie titles do to copy protection, right?

To play back copy protected discs, yes.
Quote:
You need a display with HDMI/HDCP, not DVI?

Displays can support HDCP over a DVI port. Most older ones, including the Apple Cinema Displays, do not. It seems increasingly common to support HDCP over DVI on newer displays though. Check the specs.
post #96 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Are you really that obtuse? Why do brand spankin' new HD sets support NTSC? Could it possibly be because almost all station still broadcast in it and most Americans still use it?

For me, a set that supports ATSC is all that's needed and I live in a relatively rural area. There aren't any NTSC broadcasts in my area that isn't also transmitted as ATSC. However, there are ATSC broadcasts that aren't available on NTSC because ATSC allows multicasting, and thus, offers more channels to a broadcaster.

I don't have an HDTV though. I just use an Elgato HD tuner. I do hope to get the 1080p Epson projector some time after it's released.
post #97 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by wilco View Post

Ad hominem attack deleted - JL

Can you tell us why you continue to ignore the Posting Guidelines here?
post #98 of 109
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post #99 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

The number one reason record stores are going out of business is because mega-centers are undercutting them.

Wake up, the one and only reason is the iPod and MP3's, CD sales have plummeted over the last five years everywhere not just record stores (resulting in record stores going out of business). I work with in a JHS, teenagers today dont buy CD's they laugh at the idea, they dont even own CD players, and they are the number one consumers of music.

The fact that your resistant to technology and current trends is showing your the only one who's being obtuse. I understand you obviously dont like change, unfortunately your just arguing with inevitability.
post #100 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Res View Post

I agree that you want to store your files on a hard disk for daily use, but the problem with hard drives is that they are guaranteed to fail, so you need a method to back up all your files. Some people, myself included, use extra hard drives for backup, but sooner or later you will experience a multi-drive failure, and if you have not backed up your digital pictures and other irreplaceable files to some sort of removable media, you will lose them. Consumers need a cheap and reliable way to back up their ever growing digital media files: hard drives are unreliable, DVDs way too small, and Holographic Drives are too expensive for the next few years. That leaves us with Blue-Ray 50GB disks as the best bet for consumer backup media until the next decade rolls around.

Actually (if I were you) that would simply leave me wanting a more reliable hard drive. I have yet to have any problem with a hard drive failure (but of course they do occur). Conversely I have often had problems with corrupted data on DVDs and CDs, for various reason. I understand you think the later is more reliable, but that still does nothing to support the success of either HD-DVD or Blu-Ray, its still a step backwards in technology IMHO compared to flash memory.

Sorry for the double post btw.
post #101 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Judgegavel View Post

Wake up, the one and only reason is the iPod and MP3's, CD sales have plummeted over the last five years everywhere not just record stores (resulting in record stores going out of business). I work with in a JHS, teenagers today dont buy CD's they laugh at the idea, they dont even own CD players, and they are the number one consumers of music.

The fact that your resistant to technology and current trends is showing your the only one who's being obtuse. I understand you obviously dont like change, unfortunately your just arguing with inevitability.

Don't forget the load of bad music that is being put out.
post #102 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Judgegavel View Post

Actually (if I were you) that would simply leave me wanting a more reliable hard drive. I have yet to have any problem with a hard drive failure (but of course they do occur). Conversely I have often had problems with corrupted data on DVDs and CDs, for various reason. I understand you think the later is more reliable, but that still does nothing to support the success of either HD-DVD or Blu-Ray, its still a step backwards in technology IMHO compared to flash memory.

Sorry for the double post btw.

I am glad you have never had a hard drive failure, but the thing with hard drives is that they are going to fail -- every single one of them. You never know when it will happen, but the manufactures are the first to tell you that hard drive failure is inevitable. Flash drives and dual layer DVDs just don't have the capacity to back up modern 250+ GB drives. Since Blu-Ray has over 10X the capacity of dual layer DVDs (50GB), it looks like it will be the best back-up solution for consumers for the next couple of years (if the price of the media comes down to a reasonable level). Five years down the road flash memory and holographic discs will probably be the backup media of choice, but we need something to use now, and I hope that Apple will do something to help meet the backup needs of its customers.
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post #103 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Res View Post

I am glad you have never had a hard drive failure, but the thing with hard drives is that they are going to fail -- every single one of them. You never know when it will happen, but the manufactures are the first to tell you that hard drive failure is inevitable. Flash drives and dual layer DVDs just don't have the capacity to back up modern 250+ GB drives. Since Blu-Ray has over 10X the capacity of dual layer DVDs (50GB), it looks like it will be the best back-up solution for consumers for the next couple of years (if the price of the media comes down to a reasonable level). Five years down the road flash memory and holographic discs will probably be the backup media of choice, but we need something to use now, and I hope that Apple will do something to help meet the backup needs of its customers.

Redundant hard drives are still the best backup mechanism. Discs are easily to lose, expensive, and impossible to use with things like Subversion and Time Machine.
post #104 of 109
Google has some great info on drive failure.

Engadget blurb on HD failure stats from Google

Quote:
Google studied a hundred thousand SATA and PATA drives with between 80 and 400GB storage and 5400 to 7200rpm, and while unfortunately they didn't call out specific brands or models that had high failure rates, they did find a few interesting patterns in failing hard drives. One of those we thought was most intriguing was that drives often needed replacement for issues that SMART drive status polling didn't or couldn't determine, and 56% of failed drives did not raise any significant SMART flags (and that's interesting, of course, because SMART exists solely to survey hard drive health); other notable patterns showed that failure rates are indeed definitely correlated to drive manufacturer, model, and age; failure rates did not correspond to drive usage except in very young and old drives (i.e. heavy data "grinding" is not a significant factor in failure); and there is less correlation between drive temperature and failure rates than might have been expected, and drives that are cooled excessively actually fail more often than those running a little hot.

I do not believe that optical disc is the backup medium of the future for anyone other than consumers.

Tape is still the cheapest overall tech with a current roadmap to 3.2GB per tape.

Hard Drives IMO will provide the best backup solution. Yes they fail which is why we have RAID. However they offer an unbeatable combination of speed and data storage that Optical just can't match.

I will be backing up future data on raidz2 double-parity ZFS pools with Time Machine snapshots. Hopefully Apple will eventually allow us to either replicate our data to another location or replicate to online storage. Shifting discs around is about as old school as sneakernet.
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post #105 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

Google has some great info on drive failure.

Engadget blurb on HD failure stats from Google



I do not believe that optical disc is the backup medium of the future for anyone other than consumers.

Tape is still the cheapest overall tech with a current roadmap to 3.2GB per tape.

Hard Drives IMO will provide the best backup solution. Yes they fail which is why we have RAID. However they offer an unbeatable combination of speed and data storage that Optical just can't match.

I will be backing up future data on raidz2 double-parity ZFS pools with Time Machine snapshots. Hopefully Apple will eventually allow us to either replicate our data to another location or replicate to online storage. Shifting discs around is about as old school as sneakernet.

In the non-consumer market tape is king right now, but I think that it will die out over the next decade. Companies have just started selling the first generation of holographic disks, which have 300GB capacity with transfer rates of 20MB/s and a 50+ year archive life span. Over the next few years InPhase Technologies plans to sell 1.6TB drives with 120MB transfer rates. Other companies plan to reach 3.9 TB per disk. In the coming years, with storage capacities up to nearly 4TB per disk and fast data transfer rates, holographic drives are going to be hard to beat for archiving large amounts of data.
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post #106 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregmightdothat View Post

Redundant hard drives are still the best backup mechanism. Discs are easily to lose, expensive, and impossible to use with things like Subversion and Time Machine.

Redundant drives as in mirroring or parity correction are for resistance to hard drive failures, not an archive or backup. Redundancy protects you from data loss from a failed drive. Archive/backups are for recovering from corruption or mistakes, which happens more often than drives fail.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

Tape is still the cheapest overall tech with a current roadmap to 3.2GB per tape.

Don't you mean 3.2TB?

Quote:
I will be backing up future data on raidz2 double-parity ZFS pools with Time Machine snapshots. Hopefully Apple will eventually allow us to either replicate our data to another location or replicate to online storage. Shifting discs around is about as old school as sneakernet.

The limitations to that sort of off-site storage has nothing to do with Apple, namely, the link to the outside world.
post #107 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

Redundant drives as in mirroring or parity correction are for resistance to hard drive failures, not an archive or backup. Redundancy protects you from data loss from a failed drive. Archive/backups are for recovering from corruption or mistakes, which happens more often than drives fail.

I think I wasn't clear.

I meant that for backups, you should actually use one or two regular magnetic drives, rather than using DVDs. Not that a RAID solution would work, which is what I think you think I said.

The odds of simultaneous failure are low, it's easier to restore, and you don't have to worry about keeping track of 50 discs. With Leopard, I'll be getting an Airport Extreme, hook up a USB hub and a few hard drives to it.
post #108 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Res View Post

In the non-consumer market tape is king right now, but I think that it will die out over the next decade. Companies have just started selling the first generation of holographic disks, which have 300GB capacity with transfer rates of 20MB/s and a 50+ year archive life span. Over the next few years InPhase Technologies plans to sell 1.6TB drives with 120MB transfer rates. Other companies plan to reach 3.9 TB per disk. In the coming years, with storage capacities up to nearly 4TB per disk and fast data transfer rates, holographic drives are going to be hard to beat for archiving large amounts of data.

Most companies won't even look at Inphase or holographic storage. In addition to high pricing it's still far behind Tape and HDD for performance.

Quote:
LTO-4

Specification released to licensees on 11th January 2007 [4]
Products based on LTO-4 expected in the first half of 2007.
Doubled capacity again to 800 GB.
Added drive level encryption.
Increase data transfer rate by 50% to 120 MB/s.

LTO 4 is going to deliver that next year. 1.6TB on a tape with 120MBps throughput.

Here's the DLT roadmap

http://www.dlttape.com/Roadmap/index.aspx
  • DLT S5 - 3TB 200MBps
  • DLT S6 - 6TB 400MBps
  • DLT S7- 12TB 800MBps

I'll go on record as saying Inphase is a joke. Holographic storage will never gain traction in the Enterprise and Optical formats are basically dead for backup. They don't have the performance or the durability that Tape offers.


Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

Redundant drives as in mirroring or parity correction are for failure resistance, not an archive or backup. Redundancy protects you from data loss from a failed drive. Archive/backups are for recovering from corruption or mistakes, which happens more often than drives fail.

Don't you mean 3.2TB?

The limitations to that sort of off-site storage has nothing to do with Apple, namely, the link to the outside world.

I disagree on some points. RAID based storage isn't optimum for archiving but companies are very much utilizing RAID storage as a backup medium and then choosing to archive to tape. D2D2T is actually a buzzword hyped workflow that actually works. Contrary to erroneous beliefs that tape drives are slow a LTO-3 requires damn fast computer to spool data and as we progress to LTO 4 and beyond the problem will be exacerbated.

With Today's RAID 6 and tomorrow's ZFS and other more robust fs I can see companies keeping more data backup on nearline storage arrays prior to longterm archival. Most companies can track how many restores they have to do and from that data ascertain how long they should keep backup data on nearline storage. Plus with end user restore features coming the longer you can safely keep data on nearline storage the less IT intervention you need.

Yes I meant 3.2TB ..thank you.

Please don't take this as a denigration of Inphase tech. It will find a niche it's not going to usurp Linear Tape Open options developed by a consortium of the heavy hitters versus a trickle of Holographic storage vendors.
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post #109 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

Most companies won't even look at Inphase or holographic storage. In addition to high pricing it's still far behind Tape and HDD for performance.



LTO 4 is going to deliver that next year. 1.6TB on a tape with 120MBps throughput.

Here's the DLT roadmap

http://www.dlttape.com/Roadmap/index.aspx
  • DLT S5 - 3TB 200MBps
  • DLT S6 - 6TB 400MBps
  • DLT S7- 12TB 800MBps

I'll go on record as saying Inphase is a joke. Holographic storage will never gain traction in the Enterprise and Optical formats are basically dead for backup. They don't have the performance or the durability that Tape offers.

Those number are using 2:1 compression, so you get only half that in native capacity (you can also compress files for other media if you are so inclined). Saying that "Optical formats are basically dead for backup" is somewhat premature: holographic storage is in it infancy while DLT is a matured product. I think that once the technology has had time to develop it will be a far better choice most archival needs than DLT products. Of course only time will tell, and 10 years from now there might be something new that blows both DLT and holographic storage away.

BTW: why do you think that tape has better durability than holographic storage? I've been using tape for years and have never been happy with its reliability, or the necessary head cleaning, etc.
The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing
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The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing
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