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Apple's iPhone: an initial (but in-depth) review - Page 3

post #81 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amorya View Post

As far as I know, it supports SMS, but with a 160 character limit, and a single line text box for entering them. Correct me if I'm wrong.

SMS messages are limited to 160 characters on any phone. That is the SMS specification.

Depending on the model of phone that you are using, you may be able to type an SMS message that is greater than 160 characters but the resulting message will be split into 160 character chunks. In this case the receiving party will receive multiple SMS messages containing the contents of the original (oversize) message. Some phones are capable of 'joining' these messages, once received, thus giving the illusion of a larger-than-spec message.
"Many people would sooner die than think; in fact, they do so." - Bertrand Russell
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post #82 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

Add me to the Daniel Eran / Eran Dilger non-appreciation society.

He's a fanboy not a journalist.

From Wiki:

The Elements of Journalism

According to The Elements of Journalism by Bill Kovach and Tom Rosensteil, there are nine elements of journalism. In order for a journalist to fulfill their duty of providing the people with the information they need to be free and self-governing, they must follow these guidelines:

1. Journalism's first obligation is to the truth.
2. Its first loyalty is to the citizens.
3. Its essence is discipline of verification.
4. Its practitioners must maintain an independence from those they cover.
5. It must serve as an independent monitor of power.
6. It must provide a forum for public criticism and compromise.
7. It must strive to make the significant interesting, and relevant.
8. It must keep the news comprehensive and proportional.
9. Its practitioners must be allowed to exercise their personal conscience.


Where does Eran fail when judged by this list? What current Internet "journalists" adhere to all of these guidelines?
post #83 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by audiopollution View Post

SMS messages are limited to 160 characters on any phone. That is the SMS specification.

Depending on the model of phone that you are using, you may be able to type an SMS message that is greater than 160 characters but the resulting message will be split into 160 character chunks. In this case the receiving party will receive multiple SMS messages containing the contents of the original (oversize) message. Some phones are capable of 'joining' these messages, once received, thus giving the illusion of a larger-than-spec message.

It's hardly some phones -- I don't know any phone that doesn't do the chunking of multiple SMS messages. From the cheap £10-unsubsidised mono-screen Nokias to the high-end 3G internet communicators, they all do it.
post #84 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amorya View Post

It's hardly some phones -- I don't know any phone that doesn't do the chunking of multiple SMS messages. From the cheap £10-unsubsidised mono-screen Nokias to the high-end 3G internet communicators, they all do it.

I'd like to see additional clarification that the iPhone cannot accept an SMS message, being input, of greater than 160 characters.

Also, I'd like to see additional clarification that the iPhone cannot receive longer SMS messages.

The research, which I have just done, doesn't support the contention that it is limited to 160 characters.

If any iPhone owners can send me a PM with their phone number, I will test this with them.
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post #85 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by audiopollution View Post

I'd like to see additional clarification that the iPhone cannot accept an SMS message, being input, of greater than 160 characters.

Also, I'd like to see additional clarification that the iPhone cannot receive longer SMS messages.

The research, which I have just done, doesn't support the contention that it is limited to 160 characters.

If any iPhone owners can send me a PM with their phone number, I will test this with them.

Wikipedia's SMS page sides with Amorya's comments, but empirical testing to and from a couple of cell phones will bring certainty to the debate.
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post #86 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Wikipedia's SMS page sides with Amorya's comments, but empirical testing to and from a couple of cell phones will bring certainty to the debate.

How so?

Quote:
Larger content (known as "long SMS" or "concatenated SMS") can be sent segmented over multiple messages, in which case each message will start with a user data header (UDH) containing segmentation information. Since UDH is inside the payload, the number of characters per segment is lower: 153 for 7-bit encoding, 134 for 8-bit encoding and 67 for 16-bit encoding. The receiving handset is then responsible for reassembling the message and presenting it to the user as one long message. While the standard theoretically permits up to 255 segments, 6 to 8 segment messages are the practical maximum, and long messages are often billed as equivalent to multiple SMS messages.

The entry only explains that the 'receiving handset' is responsible for reassembling the messages. It doesn't state that all receiving handsets are required to (and can) reassemble the messages. It also doesn't state that 'Long SMS' is a requirement on a phone. Granted, the majority of the phones which I've owned have allowed the generation of Long SMS messages. I can reasonably state that a smaller percentage of the phones that I have owned will reassemble Long SMS messages that were sent to me. (This may also be network dependent, in some cases, as a function of the SMSC that is being used.)

If you read one paragraph up on the Wikipedia entry, it's stated that the SMS limit is 160 characters (using a Western character encoding).

I don't see how this differs to my original post.

Surely someone has a iPhone and doesn't mind spending half-a-dollar on a bit of testing with me.
"Many people would sooner die than think; in fact, they do so." - Bertrand Russell
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"Many people would sooner die than think; in fact, they do so." - Bertrand Russell
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post #87 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by audiopollution View Post

I'd like to see additional clarification that the iPhone cannot accept an SMS message, being input, of greater than 160 characters.

Also, I'd like to see additional clarification that the iPhone cannot receive longer SMS messages.

The research, which I have just done, doesn't support the contention that it is limited to 160 characters.

If any iPhone owners can send me a PM with their phone number, I will test this with them.

Just to add, I'm speculating based on hearsay here. If it can send/receive longer SMS messages, I'll willingly eat some crow

(For the record: I am not an iPhone hater. I'll probably get one. I just don't want to ignore its flaws just because it's an Apple product!)

Amorya
post #88 of 95
The review is long, apologistic and sometimes inaccurate. But well, it does go into details and does include competitive information. Not bad by Roughly Drafted standards. It seems to please the crowd too

I still prefer Anandtech's.
-- Denis.
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-- Denis.
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post #89 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by lfe2211 View Post

From Wiki:

The Elements of Journalism

According to The Elements of Journalism by Bill Kovach and Tom Rosensteil, there are nine elements of journalism. In order for a journalist to fulfill their duty of providing the people with the information they need to be free and self-governing, they must follow these guidelines:

1. Journalism's first obligation is to the truth.
2. Its first loyalty is to the citizens.
3. Its essence is discipline of verification.
4. Its practitioners must maintain an independence from those they cover.
5. It must serve as an independent monitor of power.
6. It must provide a forum for public criticism and compromise.
7. It must strive to make the significant interesting, and relevant.
8. It must keep the news comprehensive and proportional.
9. Its practitioners must be allowed to exercise their personal conscience.


Where does Eran fail when judged by this list? What current Internet "journalists" adhere to all of these guidelines?


Personally, I like Eran, but I see him as more of a pundit than a true journalist.

Far as your wikipedia list goes, Dan might have problems in areas 1 and 4. In his review, for example, he got certain facts wrong regarding network speeds. Impossible to say if those were willful errors or just errors, though. And he does have advertising for iTunes U on his RoughlyDrafted site, though its possible that he's doing it to be nice and is receiving no compensation for it, as iTunes U has to do with education.

Far as 'what internet journalists adhere to all of these guidelines'... isn't that setting the bar low and hoping that someone trips over it? You're either a journalist or you're not, you're not a journalist on the basis of 'being better compared to some'.

Again, I like Dan's stuff. Just not sure its truly 'journalism'.

.
Cut-copy-paste, MMS, landscape keyboard, video-recording, voice-calling, and more... FINALLY
To the 'We Didn't Need It' Crowd/Apple Apologista Squad : Wrong again, lol
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Cut-copy-paste, MMS, landscape keyboard, video-recording, voice-calling, and more... FINALLY
To the 'We Didn't Need It' Crowd/Apple Apologista Squad : Wrong again, lol
Thanks for listening to your...
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post #90 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by jido View Post

The review is long, apologistic and sometimes inaccurate. But well, it does go into details and does include competitive information. Not bad by Roughly Drafted standards. It seems to please the crowd too

I still prefer Anandtech's.

Just went over there and read some of the Anandtech review... very nicely done by them.

.
Cut-copy-paste, MMS, landscape keyboard, video-recording, voice-calling, and more... FINALLY
To the 'We Didn't Need It' Crowd/Apple Apologista Squad : Wrong again, lol
Thanks for listening to your...
Reply
Cut-copy-paste, MMS, landscape keyboard, video-recording, voice-calling, and more... FINALLY
To the 'We Didn't Need It' Crowd/Apple Apologista Squad : Wrong again, lol
Thanks for listening to your...
Reply
post #91 of 95
Quote:
Where does Eran fail when judged by this list? What current Internet "journalists" adhere to all of these guidelines?

If Steve Jobs raped and murdered a bunch of schoolchildren.
Dilger would spin it into a positive story about how Apple was reaching out to a young audience.

If Microsoft's Bill Gates gave billions to charity, to starving kids in Africa. Eran would spin it into another story about the true evil empire capitalizing on the suffering of others.

I honestly think I am smart enough to make my mind up about stuff myself. I don't need some shrill fantard trying to make it up for me.

C
post #92 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

Add me to the Daniel Eran / Eran Dilger non-appreciation society.

He's a fanboy not a journalist.

He's got some really insightful analysis. I was reading his site quite extensively for a while. However - he has rose coloured glasses on... so his reviews are far too Pro Apple.

I'd like to see AppleInsider link to his RoughlyDrafted articles when he has interesting analysis, with his bias clearly noted. I don't want to give his analysis the same credence I give AppleInsider's.
post #93 of 95
Another stunning piece of "journalism" from DED.
http://daringfireball.net/2007/07/os_x_ipod_nonsense

C
post #94 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

Another stunning piece of "journalism" from DED.
http://daringfireball.net/2007/07/os_x_ipod_nonsense

C

He did not state or imply that OS X is on the iPod. He has since posted a second, simpler article to more clearly show what he meant for those who choose not to peruse in full or are just looking for loose reasons to attack.
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post #95 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

He did not state or imply that OS X is on the iPod. He has since posted a second, simpler article to more clearly show what he meant for those who choose not to peruse in full or are just looking for loose reasons to attack.

Come on,
He has a block diagram with SNOJOB in it! Lol!
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