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Majority of non-iPhone owners wowed by handset's video features

post #1 of 19
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Apple's recently-released iPhone is a likely catalyst for growth in mobile video usage, according to a recent mark study from Interpret which found that nearly three quarters of non-iPhone owners immediately gained interest in the handset after watching a short demonstration of its widescreen video playback capabilities.

The study of 1000 cell phone users -- including 200 iPhone owners and 800 non-owners -- found that 63 percent of early iPhone adopters have already used the widescreen-enabled device to watch video files, compared to only 28 percent of regular cell phone owners. Specifically, half of iPhone owners say they've watched a YouTube video on the Apple gadget, while 46 percent have watched a music video, 34 percent have watched the news, and 32 percent have watched a movie trailer.

Researchers at Interpret say the study shows that it’s not the consumers who are different, but rather it’s the iPhone. Prior to buying the Apple handset, few owners had watched video on their previous cell phones, the firm said. In particular, only 17 percent said they had watched YouTube clips, while 21 percent said they watched a music video, 16 percent reported watching the news, and 15 percent had watched a movie trailer.

"Apple has already made a name for itself as a top destination for music and video on-the- go, and consumers expect the iPhone to deliver on that reputation," said Jason Kramer, Chief Strategy Officer, Interpret. "Consumers want to watch video on their cell phones, but they have high expectations for the experience. The iPhone shows consumers that the potential is there to meet or exceed their expectations for mobile video."

The study also foreshadows what could be considered an iPhone 'halo effect' for mobile video. Initially, one-quarter or fewer non-iPhone owners reported being interested in watching various video media on a mobile phone device. But after seeing a 2-minute video about watching video on the iPhone, that percentage ballooned to nearly three-quarters (73 percent), with 42 percent indicating they were "extremely" or "very" interested.

The iPhone's widescreen video capability is clearly a compelling selling point for the handset, according to Interpret's study, as 50 percent of non-owners who are open to buying the device said that seeing the iPhone’s video capabilities made them more interested in buying one.

"What’s surprising is how wide open the market for mobile video is right now," said Kramer. "The iPhone is definitely raising consumer awareness, but there are other players to watch, like Verizon and LG’s VX9400 Mobile TV phone. Consumers are remarkably open to who delivers mobile content to them.”

A majority of both iPhone owners and non-owners are reported to consider carriers, broadcast and cable networks, movie studios, and Internet portals as appropriate sources for mobile video. However, iPhone owners and non-owners appear to have different expectations as to who will provide their mobile entertainment . Nearly 75 percent of iPhone users said they expect to get their video content from iTunes (compared to 43 percent of non-owners), and 46 percent of non-owners expect to get it from their cable or satellite company (compared to 37 percent of iPhone owners).

Interestingly, the survey also found that 66 percent of iPhone owners and 73 percent of non-owners said they prefer to watch content for free via an ad-supported model. At the same time, one-third of iPhone owners (34 percent) surveyed would consider a monthly subscription model (compared to only 21 percent of non-owners) and 28 percent would consider pay-per-download (compared to only 20 percent of non-owners).

"In order to fully capitalize on the opportunity for mobile video, Apple and its competitors will need to move beyond a pay-per-download business model,” said Michael Dowling, Interpret’s CEO. "Consumers are used to an ad-supported model for video, and are open to a wide range of advertising if companies like Apple can deliver on the user experience."

Interpret's iPhone study was conducted Friday-Tuesday (July 6-10, 2007) from a nationally-representative sample of cell phone users ages 13-64. To obtain a representative sample of iPhone owners, the firm said potential respondents were randomly chosen from four major online research panels and data was statistically adjusted for survey response bias.
post #2 of 19
Anone who says the iPhone isn't well cool, is simply lying. It's a pity, personally for me, that they didn't go with 8GB and 16GB out the gate. 8GB is just too small, and can't be upgraded with a phone you buy. Saying 8GB is way bigger other smartphones means nothing to me, cause it's meant to be a video iPod too, with 8GB and all the data you put into it, you're left with not much for your music and video. This great device is practically crying out for more storage. It's a pity flash is so expensive, cause this device would sing with 32GB.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #3 of 19
Well, I think it's pretty clear that "the true" video iPod is coming this fall, with OS X... and lots of room (32GB+) for movies and music. (Though one can expect to pay a premium over current iPods for that UI.)

It's hard to see how fullscreen iPod with OS X sales won't be explosive, and provide a huge boost to Apple getting more studios to sign on with the iTS. Apple, as ever (with their CE products, anyway), seems to be playing their hand just right.
post #4 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Saying 8GB is way bigger other smartphones means nothing to me, cause it's meant to be a video iPod too, with 8GB and all the data you put into it, you're left with not much for your music and video. This great device is practically crying out for more storage. It's a pity flash is so expensive, cause this device would sing with 32GB.

Are you wishing it hadn't come out for another year or two, or that it should cost a few hundred dollars more to buy? Those are the only two options.
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #5 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Are you wishing it hadn't come out for another year or two, or that it should cost a few hundred dollars more to buy? Those are the only two options.

Or, you know, lower profit margins
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Originally Posted by addabox

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Originally Posted by addabox

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post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hobbes View Post

Well, I think it's pretty clear that "the true" video iPod is coming this fall, with OS X... and lots of room (32GB+) for movies and music. (Though one can expect to pay a premium over current iPods for that UI.)

32BGB+? We already have 30GB/80GB capacities.It won't be NAND-based. it will be HDD-based to allow for large amounts of video to be stored. I'm guessing capacities of 60GB/100GB or 80GB/120GB or 60GB/120GB. I also expect a premium of $50 to $100 for these new OS X based iPods.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #7 of 19
solipsism,

right you are! If people think they're going to get a nand-based, touch-screen iPod, then they're living in cloud-cuckoo land. It would be prohibitively expensive.
As you say, it'll be HDD-based and the top model will have around 100 GB.
Charko
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Charko
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post #8 of 19
When showing my iPhone to people, I start with Photos for the first 'wow' effect, then move to text messages, maps, & camera. I quickly show Safari & iPod coverflow before ending with video as the finale. The video demonstration leaves their jaws dropped and them uttering "amazing".

What I don't point out is the pathetic 1-2 EDGE bars I get from AT & T in many locations in town.
post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Anone who says the iPhone isn't well cool, is simply lying.

It isn't well cool (whatever the hell well cool means). Unless that means "Its got a lot of pub and people need one so they can feel they're 'cool', 'hip', and part of the 'in' crowd. But once you get past that, its just a device, a phone, internet communicator, and video/audio player. The problem is its ALL of them. I have no need for a $600 phone. The internet communicator would be nice, but I don't have such a need to spend $20 a month on it. The iPod does sound nice, but I question how well the new interface works if you've got a large library to scroll through. And I find 8GB to be way too limiting to get it for the video choice (like I'm supposed to have an idea what I want to watch before I leave my mac for the next day or two?).
post #10 of 19
I'm after thinking that paying half the price of a MacBook for a telephone that does much but make superior calls is a bit foolish. Power to the people who've bought one, though Enjoy life! that's what I say.

[Written using a MacBook while sitting in The Brazenhead Pub, Dublin, Republic of Irland]

______________
Save Tara March -- Saturday, 21 July -- 1 PM -- Garden of Remembrance to the Customs House, Dublin
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gator View Post

I'm after thinking that paying half the price of a MacBook for a telephone that does much but make superior calls is a bit foolish. Power to the people who've bought one, though Enjoy life! that's what I say.

[Written using a MacBook while sitting in The Brazenhead Pub, Dublin, Republic of Irland]

Glad you have arrived.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charko View Post

solipsism,

right you are! If people think they're going to get a nand-based, touch-screen iPod, then they're living in cloud-cuckoo land. It would be prohibitively expensive.
As you say, it'll be HDD-based and the top model will have around 100 GB.

If you think a HDD-based iPod is going to load OS X with any quickness, then you're living in cloud-cuckoo land. Even being NAND-based, the iPhone takes several seconds to boot up and a few seconds to shut down. Loading OS X into RAM using a 4200 RPM mini-HDD will be excruciatingly slow compared to current iPods and would not project a good image on Apple.
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by PBG4 Dude View Post

If you think a HDD-based iPod is going to load OS X with any quickness, then you're living in cloud-cuckoo land. Even being NAND-based, the iPhone takes several seconds to boot up and a few seconds to shut down. Loading OS X into RAM using a 4200 RPM mini-HDD will be excruciatingly slow compared to current iPods and would not project a good image on Apple.

Who says it has to be either/or.

Why can't the OS be on NAND for fast booting and the music/video be on mini-HDD for lots of storage in the same device?
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregoriusM View Post

Who says it has to be either/or.

Why can't the OS be on NAND for fast booting and the music/video be on mini-HDD for lots of storage in the same device?

From a cost perspective this could get expensive quickly. That's why I said what I said in my earlier post. If Apple could do this cheaply then I guess OS X HDD-based iPods would be a piece of cake.
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by windsurfer_nyc View Post

When showing my iPhone to people, I start with Photos for the first 'wow' effect, then move to text messages, maps, & camera. I quickly show Safari & iPod coverflow before ending with video as the finale. The video demonstration leaves their jaws dropped and them uttering "amazing".

What I don't point out is the pathetic 1-2 EDGE bars I get from AT & T in many locations in town.

My order is:

Photo (turn for landscape, pinch out/in, flick finger for next photo)
Map
Weather
Stocks
Email
Phone
Email (if on wifi, a little earlier in this order)
iPod (basic, coverflow, video).


I was in NYC the past couple of days: ATT (incl. EDGE) sucks in the city. I was quite appalled, particularly given how well it works in a rural area where I live, and how well it worked in Paris!
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

63 percent of early iPhone adopters have already used the widescreen-enabled device to watch video files, compared to only 28 percent of regular cell phone owners

28% of people have watched video on a phone? In the US?

Does anyone else find that laughably improbably? I could see it being true for other countries but I doubt 28% of US phone users can do anything of the sort.
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfiler View Post

28% of people have watched video on a phone? In the US?

Does anyone else find that laughably improbably? I could see it being true for other countries but I doubt 28% of US phone users can do anything of the sort.

Well, if Verizon wasn't experiencing some kind of moderate success with VCAST I'd imagine they would've killed it by now. Not only are some people watching video on their cell phone, they're actually paying monthly charges to do so. Sprint/Nextel has video services as well.
post #18 of 19
Well obviously some people have phones that can do it and some are even paying extra to do it. But it doesn't take 28% exposure to make a profit in the mobile phone industry.

Perhaps it is my sample that is skewed. I could walk out the door at my company of 150 people and ask everyone here. I'd bet that only one or two have watched video on a phone. I'd expect school and college students to be high on the uptake and everyone else (beside us older forum dweebs) to be rather unlikely to have seen video on a phone.
post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfiler View Post

28% of people have watched video on a phone? In the US?

Does anyone else find that laughably improbably? I could see it being true for other countries but I doubt 28% of US phone users can do anything of the sort.

Not credible in any way. But I'd also assert the majority oif mobile phone owners user text messaging, and want/need the capacity to text multiple users at the same time. As much as I enjoy the fiun factor of my iPhone, the simplye inability of the iPhone to do something that every single device on the market perfroms simply is infuriating and a massive inconveninece. I am hopeful that a firmware update will feature this. I knwo two pals who have returned their iPhones because it lacked this feature and an inability to forward/copy text messages
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