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Introducing Molly

post #1 of 136
Thread Starter 
Today my wife and I picked up a 7 week old border collie:



We named her Molly.

I know that they're very, very smart. And I know that they need lots of tasks, so any advice about owning one in a non-working environment would be much appreciated.
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post #2 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwinter View Post

Today my wife and I picked up a 7 week old border collie:



We named her Molly.

I know that they're very, very smart. And I know that they need lots of tasks, so any advice about owning one in a non-working environment would be much appreciated.

Cute pup! Makes you want to say, "AAAAAAWWWW"
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post #3 of 136
Thread Starter 
Believe me, every other word out of our mouths has been "AWWWWWWW!!!"
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post #4 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwinter View Post

Today my wife and I picked up a 7 week old border collie:



We named her Molly.

I know that they're very, very smart. And I know that they need lots of tasks, so any advice about owning one in a non-working environment would be much appreciated.

1) Get you some sheep

2) Allow them to scatter

3) Stand back

In the event sheep are unavailable, you may substitute random birds, local children, dust bunnies, or errant pieces of furniture.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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post #5 of 136
Thread Starter 
Heh. Right now we're working on her apparent fear of surfaces that are not grass. She doesn't like ceilings, either.
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post #6 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

1) Get you some sheep

2) Allow them to scatter

3) Stand back

In the event sheep are unavailable, you may substitute random birds, local children, dust bunnies, or errant pieces of furniture.

That cracked me up. I wish I'd said that.
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post #7 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwinter View Post

Today my wife and I picked up a 7 week old border collie: we named her Molly.

I know that they're very, very smart. And I know that they need lots of tasks, so any advice about owning one in a non-working environment would be much appreciated.

Meaning no disrespect, but you should have worked this out before you got a dog. You might find that border collies, while wonderful animals, are not suited to your life-style; and if you neglect Molly and she becomes neurotic, then you'd be guilty of abuse. I really hope that you're up to this challenge.

Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

1) Get you some sheep

2) Allow them to scatter

3) Stand back

In the event sheep are unavailable, you may substitute random birds, local children, dust bunnies, or errant pieces of furniture.

My mother was raising a Border Collie - Labrador cross about ten years ago (to be a certified assistance dog). We also got two kittens at about the same time. Beamish used to herd the cats. A couple of kittens would go a long way to keep your Molly entertained (and the kittens will be entertained as well). The down-side is that two kittens and a dog may destroy your house (but not much more than a toddler would).

However, I'm afraid that Border Collies are hard to keep as pets. It's much easier to keep a retriever happy by just taking them to the park and throwing a ball around, but herding dogs are not so simple. The best place to get advice about how to keep them happy would be to talk to the breeder from whom you bought the dog.
post #8 of 136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denton View Post

My mother was raising a Border Collie - Labrador cross about ten years ago (to be a certified assistance dog).

That is a combination that scares the crap out of me: a really smart dog that will refuse to do some complicated task it knows how to do unless there is a treat involved.

I've been dog-sitting a couple of 80-lb labs for the past week while a friend is off having a baby. These labs are horrible. Horrible. Fantastic nature. Smart. But they are spoiled rotten and refuse to behave. I was raised with dogs of all kinds, and I refuse to have dogs disobey me, but these two are seriously testing my patience. When I dog-sit for them, sometimes for a few weeks at a stretch, I'll have them fetching and dropping and minding by the end. Next time? Start from square one.

What gets me, though, is that I think these labs would gnaw off a leg so long as there was a treat involved.

Quote:
We also got two kittens at about the same time. Beamish used to herd the cats. A couple of kittens would go a long way to keep your Molly entertained (and the kittens will be entertained as well). The down-side is that two kittens and a dog may destroy your house (but not much more than a toddler would).

We have two cats who seem to be taking this pup's presence remarkably well. If she herds them around the house, that's fine by me. We also have a 17-year-old umbrella cockatoo. We have yet to see how that's going to work out.

Quote:
However, I'm afraid that Border Collies are hard to keep as pets. It's much easier to keep a retriever happy by just taking them to the park and throwing a ball around, but herding dogs are not so simple. The best place to get advice about how to keep them happy would be to talk to the breeder from whom you bought the dog.

I've heard that most of these work dogs (e.g. border collies and Australian shepherds) can be difficult pets, but I've honestly always thought that a chunk of that was the owners just being bad with dogs; that is, if you don't spend time with your dog, of course it's going to be a problem.

My plan for this dog is to basically give it a lot of stuff to do. We live right on a huge park and right off of an enormous network of hiking trails that I use regularly, so if you see me on one of those amazing dog tricks shows with the dog diving off a waterfall, catching a frisbee in mid-air, then landing on the owner's back, that'll be me.

We also have a large number of friends with dogs (mostly labs), and we're planning to integrate this one into those "packs" as much as we can.
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post #9 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwinter View Post

Heh. Right now we're working on her apparent fear of surfaces that are not grass. She doesn't like ceilings, either.

awwww....


wait. what?

(apparently you need to mentally challenge your new pup -- have him read Heidegger and Plato and come up with a thesis on being that is different then the forms and, well, whatever it is that Heidegger actually proposed).
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post #10 of 136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hardeeharhar View Post

awwww....


wait. what?

(apparently you need to mentally challenge your new pup -- have him read Heidegger and Plato and come up with a thesis on being that is different then the forms and, well, whatever it is that Heidegger actually proposed).

Dude. Heidegger and Plato would've had a fistfight.

But I think I can read her big chunks of Poetry, Language, Thought. I love it when Heidegger talks about the thingly nature of the thing.
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post #11 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwinter View Post

Dude. Heidegger and Plato would've had a fistfight.

But I think I can read her big chunks of Poetry, Language, Thought. I love it when Heidegger talks about the thingly nature of the thing.

That kind of indulgence will just leave Molly weak minded.

Insist that she read her own philosophy, and that she be prepared to defend her choices.

Use treats if you must.

Bear in mind that the breed tends toward analytical materialism.
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post #12 of 136
Thread Starter 
Heh. Right now, we are working on the following commands:

Wake up!

and

STOP HERDING ME!

She slept through the night last night and finally woke up about 5:30 this morning. I took her for a walk around the block and the entire time she tried to herd me.

Although she's too young for leash training now, she's going to be dragging one around for a while to get used to the feeling.
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post #13 of 136
Absolutely right about the herding instinct and the mental problems if they cannot do their 'job'.

I hope you have time to spend with Molly. She looks like a great little pup.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

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post #14 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwinter View Post

Heh. Right now, we are working on the following commands:

Wake up!

and

STOP HERDING ME!

She slept through the night last night and finally woke up about 5:30 this morning. I took her for a walk around the block and the entire time she tried to herd me.

Although she's too young for leash training now, she's going to be dragging one around for a while to get used to the feeling.

That herding instinct comes from dog ancestors, the wolves, chasing game. All dogs are derived from wolves.
If you can, find a film called, "The Wolf in Your Living Room." It explains why dogs do the things they do. For example, a dog will turn in a circle before lying down - the wolf trampled grass before lying down.
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post #15 of 136
We need pics of Molly with a (sacrificial) philosphy text...
"In a republic, voters may vote for the leaders they want, but they get the leaders they deserve."
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post #16 of 136
My daughter's Havanese pup goes through about a book a week (shreds them). Since I don't speak 'dog', I don't know if she's assimilating the information from the books or not. However, the paperbacks are a lot cheaper than furniture.
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post #17 of 136
My daughter's dog. I don't know why it's called a Havanese. I also do not know how to size a picture.
Suggestions please. edit: Never mind. I went back to Flickr and figured it out. Thanks.

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post #18 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwinter View Post

Today my wife and I picked up a 7 week old border collie:



We named her Molly.

I know that they're very, very smart. And I know that they need lots of tasks, so any advice about owning one in a non-working environment would be much appreciated.

As long as you give her plenty of attention you will be fine. Border Collies do instinctively herd, so make sure you train her well around cars etc. They need plenty of exercise and they love to play. They are exceptionally sensitive dogs so make sure you're consistent with your affection too. Other than that, you'll be fine. They are great around kids, they learn very quickly and when trained properly are very obedient things.

Oh, congrats by the way. She looks lovely.
post #19 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwinter View Post

Today my wife and I picked up a 7 week old border collie:



We named her Molly.

I know that they're very, very smart. And I know that they need lots of tasks, so any advice about owning one in a non-working environment would be much appreciated.

How do your parents and in-laws feel about your decision to put off having kids?
post #20 of 136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BRussell View Post

How do your parents and in-laws feel about your decision to put off having kids?

My mother called her her grand-dog.

We have a 17-year-old umbrella cockatoo that is our perpetual 2-year-old, so kids have never particularly been in the offing.
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post #21 of 136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sequitur View Post

My daughter's dog. I don't know why it's called a Havanese. I also do not know how to size a picture.
Suggestions please. edit: Never mind. I went back to Flickr and figured it out. Thanks.

I'm not gonna ask what that green thing is, because it looks like it might be something dirty.
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post #22 of 136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hardeeharhar View Post

We need pics of Molly with a (sacrificial) philosphy text...

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post #23 of 136
Molly. ACK, how I hate that name!

(not your fault, just an ex-girlfriend who completely ruined the awesomeness of that name)

cute dog though
post #24 of 136
Great pets.

My 1st cousins have two. Cricket and Thibedeaux.

The barely have enough room for them both. They live on 15 acres. Good luck
post #25 of 136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by trailmaster308 View Post

Great pets.

My 1st cousins have two. Cricket and Thibedeaux.

The barely have enough room for them both. They live on 15 acres. Good luck

Well, my backyard is a 10K foot mountain and a massive network of trails, so we're hoping we'll be ok.
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post #26 of 136
A Bubble Buddy Bubble Machine (sold as the Bubblemac in Ireland so it must be good).



Or there's the Fetch-A-Bubble Machine but it only comes in chicken flavored bubbles.



A dog agility tyre. I bet you could make one, you resourceful old thing.



Bob has a set of these sausages on a rope. Well, he has 3 left and one of them is estranged from the other two.



Sexy lingerie to slip into after a hard day chasing bubbles, jumping through tires, and tugging on sausage ropes (comes in different sizes).......



..........and some bedtime reading.



Toys, fashion, toys, intellectual stimulation and more toys. Yep, that should see Molly pretty set I think.
Tomorrow shall be love for the loveless;
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Tomorrow shall be love for the loveless;
And for the lover, tomorrow shall be love.
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post #27 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwinter View Post

Well, my backyard is a 10K foot mountain and a massive network of trails, so we're hoping we'll be ok.

Ah hell you'll be fine then. I thought someone alluded to you living in a small area of a city.

Have fun. dogs are a blast
post #28 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazychester View Post

A Bubble Buddy Bubble Machine (sold as the Bubblemac in Ireland so it must be good).



Or there's the Fetch-A-Bubble Machine but it only comes in chicken flavored bubbles.



A dog agility tyre. I bet you could make one, you resourceful old thing.



Bob has a set of these sausages on a rope. Well, he has 3 left and one of them is estranged from the other two.



Sexy lingerie to slip into after a hard day chasing bubbles, jumping through tires, and tugging on sausage ropes (comes in different sizes).......



..........and some bedtime reading.



Toys, fashion, toys, intellectual stimulation and more toys. Yep, that should see Molly pretty set I think.

Wow, them's the goods.

I particularly like the look of crushing, bottomless despair on the dog regarding the forever out of reach bubble. Good times.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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post #29 of 136
They can be vindictive. (Separation anxiety?) After leaving her over a long weekend, ours _neatly_ dug up a row of my mother's rose bushes.

Nothing worse than a satirical canine.

In our desire to impose form on the world we have lost the capacity to see the form that is there;
and in that lies not liberation but alienation, the cutting off from things as they really are. --...

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In our desire to impose form on the world we have lost the capacity to see the form that is there;
and in that lies not liberation but alienation, the cutting off from things as they really are. --...

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post #30 of 136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmz View Post

They can be vindictive. (Separation anxiety?) After leaving her over a long weekend, ours _neatly_ dug up a row of my mother's rose bushes.

Nothing worse than a satirical canine.

Yeah. We're working on getting her used to us not being around, but we're also crate-training. Usually, we leave for an hour or an hour and a half and come home to find her sacked out in her crate. We don't make a big deal about leaving or coming home.
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post #31 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by adda

I particularly like the look of crushing, bottomless despair on the dog regarding the forever out of reach bubble. Good times.

I know, or like he's gazing up at a vision of the Virgin Mary he's just spotted. And that's not what they do at all.

You have to get her a Bubble Buddy, midwinter. I think it's the one I saw on TV. Spews out bubbles at a ferocious rate. Dog goes apeshit. You probably wouldn't even need to walk her. I've already tried to get Bob one but as soon as they show them on telly, they sell out everywhere.

BTW, just noticed, Molly the Collie. Nice. You must mollycoddle Molly the Collie.

I was wondering if you'd considered half a dozen Aibo for round the house?
Tomorrow shall be love for the loveless;
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Tomorrow shall be love for the loveless;
And for the lover, tomorrow shall be love.
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post #32 of 136
Good collie Miss Molly! It's like a variation on the song title thread.
Tomorrow shall be love for the loveless;
And for the lover, tomorrow shall be love.
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Tomorrow shall be love for the loveless;
And for the lover, tomorrow shall be love.
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post #33 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwinter View Post

I'm not gonna ask what that green thing is, because it looks like it might be something dirty.

That would be known as a chew toy...
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post #34 of 136
since when when has midwinter been dyslexic?
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post #35 of 136
Thread Starter 
BUMP!



Just wanted to say thanks for all the advice. Here's where we stand now:

She's almost 13 weeks old. Has only peed in the house a couple of times, and only when she was excited about something. Only pooped in the house twice, and both, we suspect, on a spot on a rug where a (now dead) cat had peed.

She comes when called. Sits on command. Lays down. Fetches most of the time. Leash trained as much as puppies can be. Does not leave the yard or run in the street unless she's following me. Sits at every intersection before crossing the street, sometimes even without being told. She never gets crated more than about 3 hours, and only then on Tuesday nights when my wife and I both teach. Other than that, we're here with her almost all the time.

She gets a long walk at least twice a day, and most mornings she runs, off-leash, with a couple of young golden retrievers in the enormous park around the corner from us. How enormous? 5 soccer fields are contained in it, but do not take up all the space.

We set up lots of play dates, like this one, with a friend's boxer:



They clearly have problems getting along:





A good friend has a springer spaniel who has become Molly's bestest friend in the whole wide world. That same friend's mother has a 4 year-old border collie who is her second-bestest friend.

We've been working hard to socialize her with other dogs, and the only problem we've had is with an 80-pound lab who is overprotective of a friend's new baby, but we're continuing that integration process now that we know about his being overprotective.

I swear, I couldn't have asked for a better experience with a puppy.

And on the "task" front, I'm devising completely devious things for her to do, such as getting a pig's ear out of a tupperware container. MUWAHAHAHAHAHAHA.
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post #36 of 136
It would seem that you have the 'hard' part behind you. Are you going to take Molly to an obedience school?

BTW, do you find the transition difficult from talking 'baby talk' to Molly to adult speech when you are in adult company? My daughter's dog is going on three and my daughter still talks baby talk to her.
Who's the Alpha 'dog' in your house? You or your wife?
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post #37 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by sequitur

Who's the Alpha 'dog' in your house? You or your wife?

Lucky you're a long way from Mrs midwinter. That's the sort of question that could get you into a whole heap of trouble.
Tomorrow shall be love for the loveless;
And for the lover, tomorrow shall be love.
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Tomorrow shall be love for the loveless;
And for the lover, tomorrow shall be love.
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post #38 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazychester View Post

Lucky you're a long way from Mrs midwinter. That's the sort of question that could get you into a whole heap of trouble.

That was a straight forward question, not a slur. A dog knows its place in the chain in any 'pack'. You and your wife are parts of Molly's pack. ONLY one person (dog or human) is the pack leader - the Alpha dog. Early in a pup's life, she KNOWS who her pack leader is. It becomes more apparent as the dog gets older. Usually, the dog ALWAYS obeys the Alpha and sometimes others dependent upon where she stands in the hierarchy.

When my ex-wife remarried, she took our dog with her. She and her new husband had a difficult time with the dog because I was the Alpha male. When I'd go to their house to pick up my daughters, the dog would run to me and show obeisance. It was only after they moved out of town that the dog eventually acclimated.
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post #39 of 136
Thread Starter 
Heh. I *think* I'm the alpha, but right now it's difficult to tell.

And upthread there was concern about having plenty of space. We just took her for a little exercise in the park, and I took this:



This is, I don't know, maybe a one minute walk from my front door. This is not the park I mentioned earlier (it was full of helicopters, for some bizarre reason). This is the public tennis courts across the street and just to the north of the park. Behind this, you can see the public golf course and then the mountain, which has something like 200 miles of trails.
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post #40 of 136
Um sequitur, my comment was a joke. Hence the laughing smiling. But don't worry. I understand. You're American.

(I'll just walk away while that one drops like a lead balloon......)

Anyway, midwinter, what about the Bubble Buddy Bubble Machine? You're not depriving poor Molly are you?
Tomorrow shall be love for the loveless;
And for the lover, tomorrow shall be love.
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Tomorrow shall be love for the loveless;
And for the lover, tomorrow shall be love.
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