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Can you read this?

post #1 of 39
Thread Starter 
[
One of our fellow members suggested that I submit this, so blame him if this offends you - not that I'm going to reveal his identity. I just want to be off the hook and not get flamed.

I received this in an e-mail a few days ago. Being a teacher trying to get students to use correct grammar and spelling, this was a comeuppance (I'm not sure if that's spelled right or not).

>Only great minds can read this

fi yuo cna raed tihs, yuo hvae a sgtrane mnid too
Cna yuo raed tihs? Olny 55 plepoe out of 100 can i cdnuolt blveiee taht
>I cluod aulaclty uesdnatnrd waht I was rdanieg. The phaonmneal pweor of the
>hmuan mnid, aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it dseno't
>mtaetr in waht oerdr the ltteres in a wrod are, the olny iproamtnt tihng is
>taht the frsit and lsat ltteer be in the rghit pclae. The rset can be a
>taotl mses and you can sitll raed it whotuit a pboerlm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn
>mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.
Azanmig huh? yaeh and I awlyas tghuhot slpeling was ipmorantt!
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post #2 of 39
old news.

and whatever.
"In a republic, voters may vote for the leaders they want, but they get the leaders they deserve."
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"In a republic, voters may vote for the leaders they want, but they get the leaders they deserve."
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post #3 of 39
Wow (Kate Bush)

In our desire to impose form on the world we have lost the capacity to see the form that is there;
and in that lies not liberation but alienation, the cutting off from things as they really are. --...

Reply

In our desire to impose form on the world we have lost the capacity to see the form that is there;
and in that lies not liberation but alienation, the cutting off from things as they really are. --...

Reply
post #4 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmz View Post

Wow (Kate Bush)

Who's Kate Bush?
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post #5 of 39
I will accept responsibility for suggesting the thread. The English language is oft abused by native speakers and the problem is increasing.

Spelling is an interesting thing, as is the new abbreviations slipping into the language thanx to text messaging.

Will oddities in text msgs begin supplanting traditional spellings?

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply
post #6 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by sequitur View Post

Who's Kate Bush?

A singer -- and a pretty Crispy Critter at that.

In our desire to impose form on the world we have lost the capacity to see the form that is there;
and in that lies not liberation but alienation, the cutting off from things as they really are. --...

Reply

In our desire to impose form on the world we have lost the capacity to see the form that is there;
and in that lies not liberation but alienation, the cutting off from things as they really are. --...

Reply
post #7 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmz View Post

A singer -- and a pretty Crispy Critter at that.

Love to see you use that line on women.

"You are one FINE crispayyy critttaaa..."

*makes chomping noise*
post #8 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShawnJ View Post

Love to see you use that line on women.

"You are one FINE crispayyy critttaaa..."

*makes chomping noise*

Crispy Critter is what EMT and hospital ER's call a burn victim but only to each other.
How does that apply to Kate Bush or do you have another meaning?
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post #9 of 39
Pretty sure it's his way of expressing his admiration for the girl.
post #10 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by sequitur View Post

Crispy Critter is what EMT and hospital ER's call a burn victim but only to each other.
How does that apply to Kate Bush or do you have another meaning?

Back in the **ehem** 80s she was doing some preeetttty far-out stuff, musically. Some of her work makes Bjork sound like Doris Day.
(But she's a dish, no doubt about it.)


I think today the phrase would be something like... "da bich 'be tripin' 'an shit"

In our desire to impose form on the world we have lost the capacity to see the form that is there;
and in that lies not liberation but alienation, the cutting off from things as they really are. --...

Reply

In our desire to impose form on the world we have lost the capacity to see the form that is there;
and in that lies not liberation but alienation, the cutting off from things as they really are. --...

Reply
post #11 of 39
The conclusion of that statement is incorrect.

Nick

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

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"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

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post #12 of 39
Yeah Kate Bush is indeed a Crispy Critter.



Universally hailed as such and with a bod to match.



With particularly fabulous tits. Even better than mine. Not that I hold it against her.



People will say "don't you know nuffink" if you don't know who Kate Bush is and that she's gorgeous. Just as they will look bored and about the spelling thing because it's been around since the time of the cavenerds.

But everybody finds it interesting the first time they come across it because it is. So don't let it bother you too much.
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And for the lover, tomorrow shall be love.
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Tomorrow shall be love for the loveless;
And for the lover, tomorrow shall be love.
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post #13 of 39
To answer the question, yes, I can read it.
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post #14 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by sequitur View Post

[
One of our fellow members suggested that I submit this, so blame him if this offends you - not that I'm going to reveal his identity. I just want to be off the hook and not get flamed.

I received this in an e-mail a few days ago. Being a teacher trying to get students to use correct grammar and spelling, this was a comeuppance (I'm not sure if that's spelled right or not).

>Only great minds can read this

fi yuo cna raed tihs, yuo hvae a sgtrane mnid too
Cna yuo raed tihs? Olny 55 plepoe out of 100 can i cdnuolt blveiee taht
>I cluod aulaclty uesdnatnrd waht I was rdanieg. The phaonmneal pweor of the
>hmuan mnid, aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it dseno't
>mtaetr in waht oerdr the ltteres in a wrod are, the olny iproamtnt tihng is
>taht the frsit and lsat ltteer be in the rghit pclae. The rset can be a
>taotl mses and you can sitll raed it whotuit a pboerlm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn
>mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.
Azanmig huh? yaeh and I awlyas tghuhot slpeling was ipmorantt!

Apparently, this is not based on any such research at Cambridge, though this text did pique the interest of a researcher at Cambridge who came across the text a number of years ago.
post #15 of 39
Null.
Þ & þ are called "Thorn" & þey represent þe sound you've associated "th" wiþ since þe 13þ or 14þ century. I'm bringing it back.
<(=_=)> (>=_=)> <(=_=<) ^(=_=^) (^=_=)^ ^(=_=)^ +(=_=)+
Reply
Þ & þ are called "Thorn" & þey represent þe sound you've associated "th" wiþ since þe 13þ or 14þ century. I'm bringing it back.
<(=_=)> (>=_=)> <(=_=<) ^(=_=^) (^=_=)^ ^(=_=)^ +(=_=)+
Reply
post #16 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slewis View Post

I'm assuming you can't read it then because there's nothing in it that's offensive.

Sebastian

As a resident of San Francisco, I imagine you must be aware that some people can be "offended" by some truly benign matters of fact.
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post #17 of 39
Null.
Þ & þ are called "Thorn" & þey represent þe sound you've associated "th" wiþ since þe 13þ or 14þ century. I'm bringing it back.
<(=_=)> (>=_=)> <(=_=<) ^(=_=^) (^=_=)^ ^(=_=)^ +(=_=)+
Reply
Þ & þ are called "Thorn" & þey represent þe sound you've associated "th" wiþ since þe 13þ or 14þ century. I'm bringing it back.
<(=_=)> (>=_=)> <(=_=<) ^(=_=^) (^=_=)^ ^(=_=)^ +(=_=)+
Reply
post #18 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Splinemodel View Post

As a resident of San Francisco, I imagine you must be aware that some people can be "offended" by some truly benign matters of fact.


Many Americans seem to be able to be offended by practically anything these days.

What happened to the old adage, "Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me"???

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply
post #19 of 39
Null.
Þ & þ are called "Thorn" & þey represent þe sound you've associated "th" wiþ since þe 13þ or 14þ century. I'm bringing it back.
<(=_=)> (>=_=)> <(=_=<) ^(=_=^) (^=_=)^ ^(=_=)^ +(=_=)+
Reply
Þ & þ are called "Thorn" & þey represent þe sound you've associated "th" wiþ since þe 13þ or 14þ century. I'm bringing it back.
<(=_=)> (>=_=)> <(=_=<) ^(=_=^) (^=_=)^ ^(=_=)^ +(=_=)+
Reply
post #20 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazychester View Post

People will say "don't you know nuffink" if you don't know who Kate Bush is and that she's gorgeous. Just as they will look bored and about the spelling thing because it's been around since the time of the cavenerds.

But everybody finds it interesting the first time they come across it because it is. So don't let it bother you too much.

It's actually a very interesting thing that shows a lot about how our brains deal with linguistic input, and why perhaps an alphabet-based language may be less effective/efficient than a logogram-based language (as in Chinese). We spend a lot of time learning spelling, and in English it is complicated by the historical background of the language, but our eyes tend to view clumps. Could a logogram-based writing system be a more efficient way of communicating ideas?

Discuss either way.

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply
post #21 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slewis View Post

It was all a lie.

Sebastian

I find that offensive. You are insinuating that my grandmother lied to me??!! My church? My school kindergarten teacher?

The entire foundation upon which my life was constructed has been shattered.

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply
post #22 of 39
Null.
Þ & þ are called "Thorn" & þey represent þe sound you've associated "th" wiþ since þe 13þ or 14þ century. I'm bringing it back.
<(=_=)> (>=_=)> <(=_=<) ^(=_=^) (^=_=)^ ^(=_=)^ +(=_=)+
Reply
Þ & þ are called "Thorn" & þey represent þe sound you've associated "th" wiþ since þe 13þ or 14þ century. I'm bringing it back.
<(=_=)> (>=_=)> <(=_=<) ^(=_=^) (^=_=)^ ^(=_=)^ +(=_=)+
Reply
post #23 of 39
Can see that you are making good use of your summer vacation, Sebastian!

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply
post #24 of 39
Null.
Þ & þ are called "Thorn" & þey represent þe sound you've associated "th" wiþ since þe 13þ or 14þ century. I'm bringing it back.
<(=_=)> (>=_=)> <(=_=<) ^(=_=^) (^=_=)^ ^(=_=)^ +(=_=)+
Reply
Þ & þ are called "Thorn" & þey represent þe sound you've associated "th" wiþ since þe 13þ or 14þ century. I'm bringing it back.
<(=_=)> (>=_=)> <(=_=<) ^(=_=^) (^=_=)^ ^(=_=)^ +(=_=)+
Reply
post #25 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slewis View Post

Yep, writing Mumbo Jumbo is what I've always wanted to do in life.

Sebastian

You should try getting a job in Washington... I hear they pay very well.

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply
post #26 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bergermeister View Post

It's actually a very interesting thing that shows a lot about how our brains deal with linguistic input, and why perhaps an alphabet-based language may be less effective/efficient than a logogram-based language (as in Chinese). We spend a lot of time learning spelling, and in English it is complicated by the historical background of the language, but our eyes tend to view clumps. Could a logogram-based writing system be a more efficient way of communicating ideas?

Discuss either way.

Learning to spell notwithstanding, children need only learn 26 characters and very basic rules for combining them together in order to read. The same can not be said for Chinese logograms, where one must know a couple thousand symbols before one can read even rudimentary text.

I dated a Chinese woman who said she still comes across words that she can't read. In addition, school children in China first learn to read and write in a phonetic equivalent of Chinese using the Latin alphabet.

All things considered, I think that we are very lucky to have an alphabetic language.
post #27 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bergermeister View Post

Many Americans seem to be able to be offended by practically anything these days.

What happened to the old adage, "Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me"???

I find that some forum members are particularly thin skinned, sensitive, and ready to flame at offenses real or imagined. Can someone explain that to me? I have been attacked several times for making what I thought was an innocent statement of fact or opinion. I am often discouraged from making a statement for fear someone is going to take it as a slur and flame me.

I had thought that registering in a forum would introduce me to people on a higher plane. That's not to say that most of the members aren't really gentlemen - and ladies. I really feel good about establishing a rapport with them. I have learned quite a bit from this forum and I vastly appreciate it.

Why are some forum members so ready to pounce? Do they log on ready to joust? I really don't find that in the 'real world". Do some of you walk around with a chip on your shoulder daring anyone to knock it off?
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post #28 of 39
Null.
Þ & þ are called "Thorn" & þey represent þe sound you've associated "th" wiþ since þe 13þ or 14þ century. I'm bringing it back.
<(=_=)> (>=_=)> <(=_=<) ^(=_=^) (^=_=)^ ^(=_=)^ +(=_=)+
Reply
Þ & þ are called "Thorn" & þey represent þe sound you've associated "th" wiþ since þe 13þ or 14þ century. I'm bringing it back.
<(=_=)> (>=_=)> <(=_=<) ^(=_=^) (^=_=)^ ^(=_=)^ +(=_=)+
Reply
post #29 of 39
Thread Starter 
I know, I know, most of you have seen this, but I couldn't resist:

Conversion Table
1. Ratio of an igloo's circumference to its diameter = Eskimo Pi
2. 2000 pounds of Chinese soup = Won ton
3. 1 millionth of a mouthwash = 1 microscope
4. Time between slipping on a peel and smacking the pavement =
1 bananosecond
5. Weight an evangelist carries with God = 1 billigram
6. Time it takes to sail 220 yards at 1 nautical mile per hour =
Knotfurlong
7. 16.5 feet in the Twilight Zone = 1 Rod Sterling
8. Half of a large intestine = 1 semicolon
9. 1,000,000 aches = 1 megahurtz
10. Basic unit of laryngitis = 1 hoarsepower
11. Shortest distance between two jokes = A straight line
12. 453.6 graham crackers = 1 pound cake
13. 1 million-million microphones = 1 megaphone
14. 2 million bicycles = 2 megacycles
15. 365.25 days = 1 unicycle
16. 2000 mockingbirds = 2 kilomockingbirds
17. 52 cards = 1 decacards
18. 1 kilogram of falling figs = 1 FigNewton
19. 1000 milliliters of wet socks = 1 literhosen
20. 1 millionth of a fish = 1 microfiche
21. 1 trillion pins = 1 terrapin
22. 10 rations = 1 decoration
23. 100 rations = 1 C-ration
24. 2 monograms = 1 diagram
25. 4 nickels = 2 paradigms
26. 2.4 statute miles of intravenous surgical tubing at Yale University
Hospital = 1 IV League
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post #30 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bergermeister View Post

Many Americans seem to be able to be offended by practically anything these days.

What happened to the old adage, "Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me"???

I'm not sure it's limited to Americans. After all, you snapped at that guy who quite jokingly pointed-out your typo.
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post #31 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Splinemodel View Post

I'm not sure it's limited to Americans. After all, you snapped at that guy who quite jokingly pointed-out your typo.

Just an American (ex-pat though I may be) functioning in our predetermined style to raise conflict throughout the world.



Just wanted to see if he could take it.

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply
post #32 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slewis View Post

Yeah but I heard the Health Care wasn't very good... and what about Dental and Vision?

Sebastian


A friend of mine has a cousin up there who is supposed to be a good dentist, so you might be alright on that front (you could always just buy your premature Perfect-Smile (TM) dentures and be done with it).

Regarding vision. In Washington? Sorry, not too much.

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply
post #33 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Splinemodel View Post

I'm not sure it's limited to Americans. After all, you snapped at that guy who quite jokingly pointed-out your typo.

Firstly, I wasn't pointing out Bergermeister's typo. Notice the first word on this line. It's an adverb, not an adjective (First, I ...). I have a bad habit of using adjectives where I should use adverbs. We all do it, but since I teach, it's a bigger mistake for me. I also make typo's and when I go back and reread what I wrote, it amuses me that I make as many mistakes as everyone else does.
We all use two languages - informal and formal. Formal when writing on the job, writing a resume, going on a job interview. Informal talking to friends, family, and .....forum members. It's more important to get the thought down than to try to be formal. In fact, if we were to speak formally to friends, I have a suspicion they'd say, "Who the hell does he think HE is."

Secondly, (I got that right, see), Bergermeister DID apologize. I appreciate that - and now we have what I consider a rapport.

Third, (scr_w the adverb), I wrote a post saying that some forum members were too thin skinned. Then, I proceeded to snap at someone who didn't want to hear from professors, but he wanted to discuss Logic (in what I thought was the wrong thread). I told him to go chase a mouse. That wasn't very nice.

Forth, (still no adverb), it's no wonder that countries don't understand each other, when we, as individuals can't be civil to one another - even when we have something in common - the great Mac and its emissary, the high and mighty, SJ. Now, let's all ki...., er, shake hands and be friends.

Finally, if you think I talk too much, just skip over my posts. I won't take it personally.
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post #34 of 39
Null.
Þ & þ are called "Thorn" & þey represent þe sound you've associated "th" wiþ since þe 13þ or 14þ century. I'm bringing it back.
<(=_=)> (>=_=)> <(=_=<) ^(=_=^) (^=_=)^ ^(=_=)^ +(=_=)+
Reply
Þ & þ are called "Thorn" & þey represent þe sound you've associated "th" wiþ since þe 13þ or 14þ century. I'm bringing it back.
<(=_=)> (>=_=)> <(=_=<) ^(=_=^) (^=_=)^ ^(=_=)^ +(=_=)+
Reply
post #35 of 39
How long is your summer vacation?

What is your reading list like? (somewhat on topic)

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply
post #36 of 39
post #37 of 39
Null.
Þ & þ are called "Thorn" & þey represent þe sound you've associated "th" wiþ since þe 13þ or 14þ century. I'm bringing it back.
<(=_=)> (>=_=)> <(=_=<) ^(=_=^) (^=_=)^ ^(=_=)^ +(=_=)+
Reply
Þ & þ are called "Thorn" & þey represent þe sound you've associated "th" wiþ since þe 13þ or 14þ century. I'm bringing it back.
<(=_=)> (>=_=)> <(=_=<) ^(=_=^) (^=_=)^ ^(=_=)^ +(=_=)+
Reply
post #38 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by sequitur View Post

Firstly, I wasn't pointing out Bergermeister's typo....

The "snap" I refer to was actually in another thread, and not at you.
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post #39 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Splinemodel View Post

The "snap" I refer to was actually in another thread, and not at you.

I accuse other members of being thin skinned and, as you point out, I thought your admonition was directed at me. I am going to make a make a concerted effort to be less paranoid.

That being said, it amazes me that some AI members are so hostile to other members.. This forum is made up of very intelligent people. As a group, they are, no doubt, in one of the highest strata of intelligence. Then why do they attack other members' opinions so vehemently? It would seem that intelligence alone does not remove a chip from one's shoulder. We should be helping one another, not flaming each other.
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