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Design details and teardown photos of Apple's new iMacs

post #1 of 43
Thread Starter 
Apple's new iMac sports a chassis that's stamped from a single piece of aluminum, making it the world's first consumer electronics device to have been carved from a piece of metal that large.

In probing Apple representatives for the finer details, Gizmodo also notes that the aluminum undercarriage of the iMac's new keyboard is exactly 3mm thin -- the same thickness as the system's chassis.

Sitting atop the unit's iSight cam is its built-in microphone, which consists of 8 laser cut holes -- so small, reportedly, that a grain of sand would have problems passing through. Meanwhile, the iSight sensor itself, as well as the IR receiver, are positioned behind the black glass border near the top of the display bezel.

Gone from the new iMac is the magnetic remote control fastener, and the only visible screw on the unit can be found at the base of the display module, between the speakers where the RAM door is located. Since the speakers are pointed downward, the sound reportedly bounces off the desk exceptionally well at a sufficient volume.

According to Giz, the black backside of the new iMacs produce a slimming effect, making the units appear to have less "junk in the trunk."

There are also some differences between the two models. For instance, the 20-inch iMac is said to feature a display with a slightly lower viewing angle and lower brightness than the 24-inch model (160-degrees vs. 178-degrees; 290 nits vs 370 nits.) However, the 20-inch iMac reportedly offers more contrast at 800:1, as opposed to the 24-inch model's 750:1. Additionally, the 24-inch iMac seems to be wall-mount ready, while the 20-inch does not.

Giz also observes that there are no LEDs on the front of either unit to indicate they are asleep. The displays are also said to be extremely glossy. "[It's] far glossier than a MacBook Pro's glossy LCD, and will be less visible in direct sunlight, if you happen to put it near a window," the site notes. "The preset color calibration for 'iMac' makes the screen look washed out. I preferred one of the other RGB profiles."



While some turned to Apple for answers on the new iMac design, others took matters into their own hands -- literally. The always dependable tear-down folk at Kodawarisan have already ripped the guts from one of the new units, revealing dual cooling fans and and a Philips-made LCD panel. Also apparent from the website's pictorial is that the iMac's glass panel must be carefully removed with suction cups.





Additional photos are available at Kodawarisan.
post #2 of 43
http://210.157.201.118/~kodawarisan/...07_mid_01.html

there was some junk at the end of picture url

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post #3 of 43
Darn that thing is beautiful..
I was deciding last night whether I should get one of these.. or food.. The need for both is oddly strong!
Thanks for the pics! (And the fixed link mstone. )

Jimzip
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post #4 of 43
There always seems to be an intense interest (something akin to feverish scientists panting crazily to get their hands on the latest crashed UFO so they can reverse engineer it) by would-be techno-buzzards to tear down and dissect anything Apple makes.

I always find the whole process somewhat questionable. Prominently pictured in many is the happy and valiant scavenger - posing like an angler with a great fish - beside some marvel of Apple engineering that loses something from the photography and composition. I suppose some would find the word descriptions interesting enough, and others would call "BS" were it not for the laborious amount of photos documenting the occasion.

I, for one, am amazed that someone actually considers such demantling serious work and attacks it with a relish seemingly implied by the industry shown.

Is there a similar frenzy attending every Dell or HP product launch?

Or is it because Apple is so secretive, it becomes more a question of "voyeurism" than mere intellectual curiousity?

What exactly is the benefit to the several post-mortem sites that always duplicate each others efforts, often reducing such efforts to something that looks like various degrees of shade tree mechanics trying to work on a Ferrari?

Curious - I'm sure someone will defend it as a "necessary" and "rewarding" practice. *Yawn* There nevers seems a serendipitous moment in all of it.

Too bad I just don't get it. I certainly don't have to read it if I see it is going to be a "tear-down" article.
post #5 of 43
What's the resolution of the iSight camera? Anyone know?
post #6 of 43
Look at the image where they remove the screen and think of how beautiful it could have been had they not put a stupid black border on the glass. So close and yet so far. Maybe some company will come up with a way to customize them.

Also, I hope that's not the procedure for opening the iMac, suction cups on the glass. The old one you just unscrew some screws and the whole back lifts off.
post #7 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

Look at the image where they remove the screen and think of how beautiful it could have been had they not put a stupid black border on the glass.

It would have looked almost exactly like the old one...
post #8 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by meh 2 View Post

There always seems to be an intense interest (something akin to feverish scientists panting crazily to get their hands on the latest crashed UFO so they can reverse engineer it) by would-be techno-buzzards to tear down and dissect anything Apple makes.

I always find the whole process somewhat questionable. Prominently pictured in many is the happy and valiant scavenger - posing like an angler with a great fish - beside some marvel of Apple engineering that loses something from the photography and composition. I suppose some would find the word descriptions interesting enough, and others would call "BS" were it not for the laborious amount of photos documenting the occasion.

I, for one, am amazed that someone actually considers such demantling serious work and attacks it with a relish seemingly implied by the industry shown.

Is there a similar frenzy attending every Dell or HP product launch?

Or is it because Apple is so secretive, it becomes more a question of "voyeurism" than mere intellectual curiousity?

What exactly is the benefit to the several post-mortem sites that always duplicate each others efforts, often reducing such efforts to something that looks like various degrees of shade tree mechanics trying to work on a Ferrari?

Curious - I'm sure someone will defend it as a "necessary" and "rewarding" practice. *Yawn* There nevers seems a serendipitous moment in all of it.

Too bad I just don't get it. I certainly don't have to read it if I see it is going to be a "tear-down" article.

You sure took a lot of fancy words to tell everyone you don't like it.
post #9 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by meh 2 View Post

There always seems to be an intense interest (something akin to feverish scientists panting crazily to get their hands on the latest crashed UFO so they can reverse engineer it) by would-be techno-buzzards to tear down and dissect anything Apple makes.

I always find the whole process somewhat questionable. Prominently pictured in many is the happy and valiant scavenger - posing like an angler with a great fish - beside some marvel of Apple engineering that loses something from the photography and composition. I suppose some would find the word descriptions interesting enough, and others would call "BS" were it not for the laborious amount of photos documenting the occasion.

I, for one, am amazed that someone actually considers such demantling serious work and attacks it with a relish seemingly implied by the industry shown.

Is there a similar frenzy attending every Dell or HP product launch?

Or is it because Apple is so secretive, it becomes more a question of "voyeurism" than mere intellectual curiousity?

What exactly is the benefit to the several post-mortem sites that always duplicate each others efforts, often reducing such efforts to something that looks like various degrees of shade tree mechanics trying to work on a Ferrari?

Curious - I'm sure someone will defend it as a "necessary" and "rewarding" practice. *Yawn* There nevers seems a serendipitous moment in all of it.

Too bad I just don't get it. I certainly don't have to read it if I see it is going to be a "tear-down" article.

personally i'd just like to know if there's any hope of a user hard-drive upgrade
post #10 of 43
After looking at those picture, I keep thinking i need a "Mac" with desktop component or a Mac Pro Nano.
post #11 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTel View Post

What's the resolution of the iSight camera? Anyone know?

No idea, but http://www.apple.com/imac/isight.html claims it's high-resolution. The MacBook and MacBook pro do not say high-resolution when describing the camera itself.

Here's hoping for several megapixels, unlike the current .3.

-=|Mgkwho
post #12 of 43
Why is there a sticker reading "Warranty void if removed" covering a screw holding the heat pipe to the logic board? If you've already gotten that far, you might as well go whole hog.
post #13 of 43
From what I can see, they did not remove anything that carried a "Void warranty" sticker.

Also, although it would be difficult for someone at home to do, I don't see any problems that a techie would have in getting to the guts of the iMac.

A simple suction cup and removal of the LCD and you're there.

And I quite like the black rim around the screen. I think it would look far too plain and machinery-like without it there.

It also hides the camera.

All in all, it's a great iMac.

It is however, NOT a mini-tower, which I still feel is necessary.

I'm assuming that Apple wants Time Machine to backup to the same HD, so that there are no USB connections at the back? Silly idea. There should have been dual drives inside.

And I'm assuming the Apple expects us to have a digital camera with USB support for uploading our pictures to the iMac? There are no media card slots on it (unless I'm missing something). For those with more than one card style, or more than one card for their high end camera, then that would be another cord dangling from the back.

So, to compare an iMac the way they do with one power cord, and one USB cord (for the keyboard/mouse) with a PC with a tangle of cables at the back is misleading.

To use time Machine, you need the external HD. To use anything that has a media card, you need another cord. Etc. Etc.

They haven't compared apples to apples. Yes, the iMac does away with SOME of the cords necessary, but certainly not in the way they represent it.

So, IMHO, they still need a mid-tower Mac.

Thanks for listening.

Oh... and why do people open their computers? Well, I for one appreciate those pictures to see how Apple designed it. I am fascinated by how things are designed, put together, how hard it is to take apart for the technician or the home user, etc.

I wonder at the poster above who wonders about those of us who enjoy seeing the design INSIDE as well as outside of our equipment. The same thing is done in the home theater environment.

Thanks for "listening".
post #14 of 43
Is the CPU still in a socket, or is it soldered on now... I was hoping there was a slim chance of dropping in Penryn sometime next year.
post #15 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgkwho View Post

No idea, but http://www.apple.com/imac/isight.html claims it's high-resolution. The MacBook and MacBook pro do not say high-resolution when describing the camera itself.

Here's hoping for several megapixels, unlike the current .3.

-=|Mgkwho

Although iChat currently limits it to 640*480, apparentely the iSight in the new MBPs is 1.3. I read that on macrumors I think.

Edit: Yup, found the link

http://www.macrumors.com/2007/06/28/...-3-mp-upgrade/
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post #16 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregoriusM View Post

I'm assuming that Apple wants Time Machine to backup to the same HD, so that there are no USB connections at the back? Silly idea. There should have been dual drives inside.

That would affect the form factor though, with space and heat being the issues.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GregoriusM View Post

And I'm assuming the Apple expects us to have a digital camera with USB support for uploading our pictures to the iMac? There are no media card slots on it (unless I'm missing something). For those with more than one card style, or more than one card for their high end camera, then that would be another cord dangling from the back.

So, to compare an iMac the way they do with one power cord, and one USB cord (for the keyboard/mouse) with a PC with a tangle of cables at the back is misleading.

Are you referring to the small box on top of the Dell case? Thats an IR sensor for the media remote controller, not a card reader...

I don't see an issue of using a multi-card reader connected via the USB slot on the Mac keyboard for ease of access...

Quote:
Originally Posted by GregoriusM View Post

To use time Machine, you need the external HD.

I was under the impression you can always backup over to a network share? Surely a locally connected hard disk isn't the only option?

Quote:
Originally Posted by GregoriusM View Post

To use anything that has a media card, you need another cord. Etc. Etc.

Again, covering all the various standard out there would affect the form factor. If there was a single industry standard of flash media, I'm sure Apple would have included it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GregoriusM View Post

So, IMHO, they still need a mid-tower Mac.
post #17 of 43
This new iMac reminds me of the Simpsons episode where the kids go crazy to buy the new Malibu Stacey doll simply because she has a new hat. I can't figure out why I would want to replace my existing iMac with this new one -- simply because it's a different color and the screen is highly reflective? That seems like a really bad thing, I hate glossy screens. They'll have to make it matte again before I'll upgrade.
post #18 of 43
Seeing that taking the glass cover off the screen is rather easy, I had an idea on how to solve the problem some people have with the high-gloss display: Take it to your local glass shop and have the front sandblasted or etched.

Maybe I should offer this as a services... Does Apple sell the glass covers as spare parts? Just in case one wants to restore the original status.
post #19 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by RolandG View Post

Seeing that taking the glass cover off the screen is rather easy, I had an idea on how to solve the problem some people have with the high-gloss display: Take it to your local glass shop and have the front sandblasted or etched.

Maybe I should offer this as a services... Does Apple sell the glass covers as spare parts? Just in case one wants to restore the original status.



As just posted on Macworld:

For those that missed it the "GLOSSY" part of the screen is really just a glass plate held on by magnets, over a regular, MATTE finished LCD. If you really had your heart set on an iMac, simply removing the glass plate will restore the traditional non-glossy screen, AND provide a nice recess to keep the screen in shadow.[/I]

It seems obvious that third-party 'non-glare replacement glass' will be for sale in the next day or so. With or without the black frame. Maybe even from Apple.

NOTE: According to recent posters who have actually gone to an Apple Store and had hands-on, glare is not an issue.
post #20 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by meh 2 View Post

There always seems to be an intense interest (something akin to feverish scientists panting crazily to get their hands on the latest crashed UFO so they can reverse engineer it) by would-be techno-buzzards to tear down and dissect anything Apple makes.

I always find the whole process somewhat questionable. Prominently pictured in many is the happy and valiant scavenger - posing like an angler with a great fish - beside some marvel of Apple engineering that loses something from the photography and composition. I suppose some would find the word descriptions interesting enough, and others would call "BS" were it not for the laborious amount of photos documenting the occasion.

I, for one, am amazed that someone actually considers such demantling serious work and attacks it with a relish seemingly implied by the industry shown.

Is there a similar frenzy attending every Dell or HP product launch?

Or is it because Apple is so secretive, it becomes more a question of "voyeurism" than mere intellectual curiousity?

What exactly is the benefit to the several post-mortem sites that always duplicate each others efforts, often reducing such efforts to something that looks like various degrees of shade tree mechanics trying to work on a Ferrari?

Curious - I'm sure someone will defend it as a "necessary" and "rewarding" practice. *Yawn* There nevers seems a serendipitous moment in all of it.

Too bad I just don't get it. I certainly don't have to read it if I see it is going to be a "tear-down" article.

That's a lot to say, I am puzzled by the verbosity.

I think it's the challenge of it, Apple's products are notoriously hard to get into.
post #21 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by RolandG View Post

Seeing that taking the glass cover off the screen is rather easy, I had an idea on how to solve the problem some people have with the high-gloss display: Take it to your local glass shop and have the front sandblasted or etched.

Maybe I should offer this as a services... Does Apple sell the glass covers as spare parts? Just in case one wants to restore the original status.

Etching is a bad way to go, you aren't likely to be able to see anything through it. I would pay more for an antireflective treatment that's been done on some CRTs and eyeglasses. It's done on most camera lenses & binoculars that I've seen too.
post #22 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flounder View Post

Although iChat currently limits it to 640*480, apparentely the iSight in the new MBPs is 1.3. I read that on macrumors I think.

Edit: Yup, found the link

http://www.macrumors.com/2007/06/28/...-3-mp-upgrade/

If it's still the cell phone camera style, then the picture's not going to be much better at the higher resolution.
post #23 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

Etching is a bad way to go, you aren't likely to be able to see anything through it. I would pay more for an antireflective treatment that's been done on some CRTs and eyeglasses. It's done on most camera lenses & binoculars that I've seen too.

I am no glass expert, as you can tell from my first post, but this kind of treatment is what I had in mind. In my understanding, roughing up the surface would eliminate the reflections. May be there are other more suitable treatments available (IRC CRTs have multiple layers of coating). But you get the idea...

I wonder why (possibly cost-of-scale effects or cost of storing multiple variants) Apple does not offer matte glass as an option.
post #24 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by killerapp View Post

This new iMac reminds me of the Simpsons episode where the kids go crazy to buy the new Malibu Stacey doll simply because she has a new hat. I can't figure out why I would want to replace my existing iMac with this new one -- simply because it's a different color and the screen is highly reflective? That seems like a really bad thing, I hate glossy screens. They'll have to make it matte again before I'll upgrade.

The design is not as awful as some people have been saying. I went to the Apple store and played around with it. I thought it was pretty slick. The glass screen did not seem to be a problem at all. It may not be the right machine for some of you Mac purists, but the target market may be mostly the switchers who will be using it with the new iMovie EZ.

m

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post #25 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

As just posted on Macworld:

For those that missed it the "GLOSSY" part of the screen is really just a glass plate held on by magnets, over a regular, MATTE finished LCD. If you really had your heart set on an iMac, simply removing the glass plate will restore the traditional non-glossy screen, AND provide a nice recess to keep the screen in shadow.[/I]

It seems obvious that third-party 'non-glare replacement glass' will be for sale in the next day or so. With or without the black frame. Maybe even from Apple.

It's pretty cool that it's held in by magnets, I was wondering how they just pulled the thing off with suction cups. I really hope there will be custom screens with possibly a silver border. They could even be pretty thin plastic screens with a small metallic strip round the edges - or maybe the magnet is on the screen?
post #26 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by RolandG View Post

I am no glass expert, as you can tell from my first post, but this kind of treatment is what I had in mind. In my understanding, roughing up the surface would eliminate the reflections. May be there are other more suitable treatments available (IRC CRTs have multiple layers of coating). But you get the idea...

I wonder why (possibly cost-of-scale effects or cost of storing multiple variants) Apple does not offer matte glass as an option.

Sorry, but I think matte glass is just as dumb as glossy glass. It's a false dichotomy. They are both lower quality options than a proper anti-reflective treatment.
post #27 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I think it's the challenge of it, Apple's products are notoriously hard to get into.

If it's hard for end users to get into, then imagine how the technicians who actually have to repair these things must feel. With every new generation of iMac after the original iMac G5, Apple has shown complete disregard for ease of service. Apple doesn't realize that by making their iMacs and laptops so difficult for technicians to take apart, Apple is also forcing customers to wait longer for repairs to get done. Believe it or not, technicians actually have more than one customer each day. So a technician can't afford to spend all day working on a single computer while the phone is ringing off the hook and other customers are waiting in line.

If Apple does not start making dramatic improvements in ease of service, then technicians should start taking matters into their own hands. If customers continue to act like ease of service is not their problem, then technicians should make it the customer's problem. Technicians should automatically put all iMac repairs on lowest priority regardless of whether that iMac came in first. In fact, they should just let the iMac sit on the shelf for a couple of days out of spite before even looking at it. Another way for repair shops to screw with Apple is to wait for the Mac technician to get swamped with iMac and MacBook Pro repairs, and then load him up with a dozen other repairs that same day. If the Mac tech complains that he can't take any more calls because he is too busy, the call dispatcher should respond with a smartass remark like "But I thought Macs were so easy to work on". Apple authorized repair shops should also complain constantly to Apple Service Provider Support regarding the poor serviceability of iMacs. They should refuse to work on iMacs locally, and just ship all iMacs out to Apple. This provides the added benefit of making the iMac owner wait longer for repairs. Repair shops should not be afraid to punish iMac owners. If Apple won't make iMacs easy for technicians to repair, then Apple should repair all iMacs themselves, and customer service be damned.
post #28 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haggar View Post

If Apple does not start making dramatic improvements in ease of service, then technicians should start taking matters into their own hands. If customers continue to act like ease of service is not their problem, then technicians should make it the customer's problem. Technicians should automatically put all iMac repairs on lowest priority regardless of whether that iMac came in first. In fact, they should just let the iMac sit on the shelf for a couple of days out of spite before even looking at it.

Authorized Apple Service Centers would be the place to take your Apple products needing repair not the Maytag man.

m

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post #29 of 43
Get a life. Then get an iMac with Applecare.
post #30 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Authorized Apple Service Centers would be the place to take your Apple products needing repair not the Maytag man.

m

The Authorized Apple Service guy who replaced the Super Drive in my iMac G4 under AppleCare took about 30 minutes altogether to disassemble and reassemble the iMac, and about 2 minutes to swap the actual drive out. He also voiced his opinion that the 'Sunflower' iMacs 'look cool' but he 'hates' to work on them. Your point was?

Quote:
Originally Posted by GregoriusM View Post

So, to compare an iMac the way they do with one power cord, and one USB cord (for the keyboard/mouse) with a PC with a tangle of cables at the back is misleading.

No kidding! Apples are less cluttered than most other computers, but I'm sitting here with every USB an all but one FW port on my iMac used, along with 2 of 4 USB ports on the hub I have tucked behind it, along with the enormous tangle of associated wires. Printer, keyboard/mouse, APC (USB), FW backup drive, and the hub itself, plus an Ethernet cable to and from the home LAN router and DSL modem. Not to mention leaving a port on the back open for my iPod or joystick/gamepad, which won't work on the free port on the keyboard. (the USB 1.1 ports on the old Pro keyboard are underpowered)
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post #31 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by iPoster View Post

The Authorized Apple Service guy who replaced the Super Drive in my iMac G4 under AppleCare took about 30 minutes altogether to disassemble and reassemble the iMac, and about 2 minutes to swap the actual drive out. He also voiced his opinion that the 'Sunflower' iMacs 'look cool' but he 'hates' to work on them. Your point was?

You made the point quite well. The tech's 'hate' sounds more like 'I hate to get up in the the morning', not the full on frothing at the mouth hatred expressed by the previous poster.

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post #32 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

That's a lot to say, I am puzzled by the verbosity.

I think it's the challenge of it, Apple's products are notoriously hard to get into.

Allow me to be more direct. From my perspective, there is a dichotomy.

Here is how the scavengers (et tu) doing the post mortem seem to think of themselves for having done the "notoriously difficult task of disassembling an Apple product" (seeing as how it is so difficult and all):



This, on the other hand, is how they seem to me:



Seeing as how two pictures should be worth two thousand words, you need no longer be puzzled.
post #33 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by meh 2 View Post

Allow me to be more direct. From my perspective, there is a dichotomy.

Here is how the scavengers (et tu) doing the post mortem seem to think of themselves for having done the "notoriously difficult task of disassembling an Apple product" (seeing as how it is so difficult and all):

This, on the other hand, is how they seem to me:

Seeing as how two pictures should be worth two thousand words, you need no longer be puzzled.

What? Is your point that you think Kodawarisan is stupid or some uncultured mongrel? Is that really something that's hard to say briefly or simply? It's not that a complex of an idea.

Anyway, I really don't see the problem.
post #34 of 43
I don't necessarily agree with Meh 2s conclusions, but I would like to say that I find his posts to be smart and eloquent (which I suppose is another man's "verbose").

Just because someone elects to think a bit about the motivations and public persona of the folks doing teardowns doesn't make them pointlessly elaborate-- and the trophy fish guys vs. Nipper the RCA dog is actually pretty funny, in a slightly obscure sort of way.
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post #35 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

I don't necessarily agree with Meh 2s conclusions, but I would like to say that I find his posts to be smart and eloquent (which I suppose is another man's "verbose").

Just because someone elects to think a bit about the motivations and public persona of the folks doing teardowns doesn't make them pointlessly elaborate-- and the trophy fish guys vs. Nipper the RCA dog is actually pretty funny, in a slightly obscure sort of way.

The problem I had was that it was written in some snide tone, and I don't know what the hell "demantling" is. If you are going to be snide and uppity in your language, you might as well try to use words that exist.

In effect, all I read out of it is "I don't give a damn how things work or how things are put together, and I look down on people that do".
post #36 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

The problem I had was that it was written in some snide tone, and I don't know what the hell "demantling" is. If you are going to be snide and uppity in your language, you might as well try to use words that exist.

In effect, all I read out of it is "I don't give a damn how things work or how things are put together, and I look down on people that do".

JeffDM - let me apologize to you. English is not my first or even my second language. I don't know you and did not realize you were the one in the photographs. I did not mean to besmirch your good name.

Also, I only have an out of date OED to rely on as for the word "demantle" and I could easily be wrong - I suppose you are more familiar with the American version "dismantle." I speak English in the manner of those from whom I learned the language. I am studying the manner in which you express yourself and obviously I have a way to go before achieving your economy of word and thought.

Again, I apologize for any confusion my poor English has caused you.

Have a great day.
post #37 of 43
I'm sorry about that, that was something I didn't realize. In that respect, you did very well. I was the jerk here.
post #38 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I'm sorry about that, that was something I didn't realize. In that respect, you did very well. I was the jerk here.

Not at all. Please do not feel that way.

Your country (I assume you are a U.S. citizen) is a wonderful thing - and one of the most beautiful things about it is that you feel free to express yourself - even if later you recant and change your mind. Other countries do not have this freedom of expression.

I read a book about a year or two ago called "The world is Flat" by T. Friedman - in it he proceeded to expound on how America is going down because other countries are getting a toe-hold on educational parity with the cross-section of U.S. schoolchildren in international tests like TIMMS.

What I think Mr. Friedman misses - which he would because he is an American citizen and may therefore be too close to see it - is that these other countries may have greater trained numbers of schoolchildren but what they do not have is freedom of expression. This alone seems to unlock the creative part of the mind that is so expressive and good with what is at the heart of America. You imagine what others dare not conceive. That alone will see you come out on the good end of things - that and the faith you seem to secretly possess.

I do not find in your national anthems any reference to America being the nation of the smartest or best at math contests. What I do find is the true saying - that America is the land of the free and home of the brave.

And that last part - brave and free - as Robert Frost said - "makes all the difference."
post #39 of 43
^ geez, get a room you two.

Back to the iMac, is there a way to tell when it's actually asleep now? The flashing light is a characteristic of all the Mac models. How do you know when it's off and when it's asleep?

Also I've heard the magnet for the remote was moved to the front-right of the machine. It seems a bit silly to me if they did that. Maybe you could shove a strip magnet into the remote itself and it would attach anywhere to the machine? Or do magnets not stick to the kind of metal they use?
post #40 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

Back to the iMac, is there a way to tell when it's actually asleep now? The flashing light is a characteristic of all the Mac models. How do you know when it's off and when it's asleep?

Good question. If there is no visual display then I guess you hit a key on the keyboard or click the mouse.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

Also I've heard the magnet for the remote was moved to the front-right of the machine. It seems a bit silly to me if they did that. Maybe you could shove a strip magnet into the remote itself and it would attach anywhere to the machine? Or do magnets not stick to the kind of metal they use?

I had heard that there is no longer a magnet so that the remote does not stick to the iMac at all. If so, I might be tempted to attach the remote to the back via velcro.

If nobody answers either question then I will let you know later this week when mine arrives.
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