or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPod + iTunes + AppleTV › NewsCorp (Fox) says it won't join NBC's iTunes walkout
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

NewsCorp (Fox) says it won't join NBC's iTunes walkout

post #1 of 42
Thread Starter 
NewsCorp., which umbrellas Fox TV, will not pull its television shows from Apple Inc.'s iTunes Store as rival media group NBC Universal has done over a pricing dispute, a company executive said Tuesday.

In an interview with Reuters, NewsCorp President and chief operating officer Peter Chernin said Rupert Murdoch's media group was not in a dispute with Apple, but would like a bigger voice in pricing its shows.

"Right now we have a perfectly good relationship with Apple," he said. "But let me say this, we're the ones who should determine what the fair price for our product is, not Apple."

Some industry watchers had expected NewsCorp and other media groups to follow the lead of NBC Universal, which said last month it would not extend its agreement to sell television shows on the Apple download service because it wanted more flexibility in offering different packages and pricing.

Reuters reports that NewsCorp's decision to keep popular Fox shows such as 24 and Prison Break on iTunes should be welcomed by Apple chief executive Steve Jobs, who is facing growing opposition from media companies over who should mandate the pricing structures for their original content.

Following a standoff in negotiations earlier this summer, Universal Music Group of Vivendi -- the worlds biggest music label -- said it would not renew its annual contract to sell music through iTunes. Instead, Universal said it would market music to Apple at will, allowing it to yank its songs from the iTunes service on short notice if the two sides do not agree on pricing or other terms in the future.
post #2 of 42
I don't understand the AI writer's aversion to actually linking to the sources of their stories. For news posted on other web stories, there is no legitimate reason not to that I am aware. However, AI writers do seem pretty happy to link to other AI stories. That's awfully petty for people posing as journalists.

Link:
http://www.reuters.com/article/merge...53262920070911
post #3 of 42
The extremely biased nature of the value of a television program contrasting the production company's wants and the consumers' desires stipulates that all programs should cost the same, otherwise, you're making the judgement call for someone else on what it is worth to them. That is hogwash, hogwash I say! I hope youtube succeeds to the extent that all media becomes virtually free. Before television people were social and entertained each other, now we get to pay a faceless entity for mindless ADD relief.
post #4 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I don't understand the AI writer's aversion to actually linking to the sources of their stories. For news posted on other web stories, there is no legitimate reason not to that I am aware. However, AI writers do seem pretty happy to link to other AI stories. That's awfully petty for people posing as journalists.

Link:
http://www.reuters.com/article/merge...53262920070911

The link is in the story. It was an oversight and quickly corrected. However, the update takes a few minutes to sync to all of our servers and therefore you may have not seen the link for the first few minutes.

Best,

K
EIC- AppleInsider.com
Questions and comments to : kasper@appleinsider.com
Reply
EIC- AppleInsider.com
Questions and comments to : kasper@appleinsider.com
Reply
post #5 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

In an interview with Reuters, NewsCorp President and chief operating officer Peter Chernin said Rupert Murdoch's media group was not in a dispute with Apple, but would like a bigger voice in pricing its shows.

"Right now we have a perfectly good relationship with Apple," he said. "But let me say this, we're the ones who should determine what the fair price for our product is, not Apple."

Actually, is it not the consumers that will determine the fair price of their product? I mean NewsCorps, NBC and others have the right to value their product at a pricing structure other than what Apple believes is fair, but in the end, is it not I, the customer, that makes the ultimate decision by purchasing their download or not?!

Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

Reply

Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

Reply
post #6 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by alienzed View Post

The extremely biased nature of the value of a television program contrasting the production company's wants and the consumers' desires stipulates that all programs should cost the same, otherwise, you're making the judgement call for someone else on what it is worth to them. That is hogwash, hogwash I say!

I'll call that a non-sequitur. It's a market economy, the seller can try to sell at the price they want, if a buyer doesn't think it's worth the asking price, then the buyer can buy something else or nothing at all. The buyer doesn't have to buy any given show or any show at all.

Quote:
I hope youtube succeeds to the extent that all media becomes virtually free. Before television people were social and entertained each other, now we get to pay a faceless entity for mindless ADD relief.

I think YouTube-type sites would make the ADD problem even worse.
post #7 of 42
if it's not on iTunes, I'll get it for free from somewhere else.
post #8 of 42
It's an interesting position...

Yes Fox/NBC/etc should have the right to charge whatever they want, and if people choose not to buy it then unlucky for them.

Yes Apple has had great success by offering a simple model - one price fits all. This also where that price is probably lower than what the networks would like to charge.

Apple is not just mediating the market between the producers and the consumers though - it is CREATING a market. If Apple doesn't do it eventually some similar system will emerge, but that something will take longer and be more complex and will likely be more highly priced (to start with) and heavily controlled. And Apple will have little say in it.

So Apple wants to make this succeed and is doing their best to push the networks into the model they believe can make it happen. And other providers are copying Apple's general models by and large, it seems.
post #9 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by suhail View Post

if it's not on iTunes, I'll get it for free from somewhere else.

Exactly. Thank you.

That's precisely how I, and most of my friends, feel about this whole deal. iTunes is really the only place we feel okay with spending money on digital content. If I'm not buying it on iTunes, I'm getting it free, or buying it physically in a music/video store.

I have a feeling we're not the only ones.
Sent from my iPhone
Reply
Sent from my iPhone
Reply
post #10 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post

Actually, is it not the consumers that will determine the fair price of their product? I mean NewsCorps, NBC and others have the right to value their product at a pricing structure other than what Apple believes is fair, but in the end, is it not I, the customer, that makes the ultimate decision by purchasing their download or not?!


Hear, Hear!!
OMG here we go again...
Reply
OMG here we go again...
Reply
post #11 of 42
most of these sites should get there facts straight because NBC its not leaving apple or its walking out, there not happy with each other but Nbc its never goin to pull there stuff from iTunes its just that they wanna be free to explore new grounds if they so choose to it, with out being attach to a long contract
post #12 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post

Actually, is it not the consumers that will determine the fair price of their product? I mean NewsCorps, NBC and others have the right to value their product at a pricing structure other than what Apple believes is fair, but in the end, is it not I, the customer, that makes the ultimate decision by purchasing their download or not?!

Well NewsCorp needs an education on how things work in the real world.

NewsCorp (the maker of the content) does NOT control the pricing at ANY store front except the one they might run. They do not dictate the price of the DVD set with Best Buy--Best Buy does. Why do they think they can tell Apple what the enduser price should be?

Creator of Product -- sets the price retail buys the product for -- retail sets the price the consumer pays for it.

So NewsCorp and NBC for that matter.. get busy with iNewsFoxTunes and iNBCTunes and we'll see ya soon! I am quite sure EVERYONE will then go to their software store front to buy their favorite shows!

Oh yeah.. that is the value Apple is bringing to the mix--the storefront. You see--that's why Apple can dictate what the price is to the consumer.

Hehe.. can't wait for hulu.com -- THE solution from NBC.


-mark=
post #13 of 42
I do not object to setting different prices as long as they are consistent. Meaning, if the studios want to sell 60 minute shows (40 minutes viewable) for $1.99 and 30 minute shows (20 minutes viewable) for $.99, or charge less for a season pass than for all shows individually, I would have no problem with that. The problem is the "packaging" the studios want to include which will mess with the consistency of the iTunes Store experience, not to mention the BS Apple would have to deal with on a daily/weekly basis to put the various "deals" together and display them in the iTunes Store.

P.S. How can the studios realistically complain when selling through the iTunes Store brings in additional revenue they would not be getting if they relied on the methods they used before using the iTunes Store?
post #14 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post

Actually, is it not the consumers that will determine the fair price of their product?

No. That's the market price. It doesn't necessarily equate to a 'fair' price.

Apple dictate not only the market price but by extension the fairness of the price. So, for a show that costs only thousands to make, the price is unfair to consumers and with a show that costs millions, it's unfair to producers.

As long as the average of $1.99 doesn't go up, I'd think Apple being a bit more flexible would be a good thing for everybody. Consumers get to buy old shows for less and content producers get to shoot expensive shows without worrying about recouping costs at $1.99 a time.
post #15 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clalron View Post

Well NewsCorp needs an education on how things work in the real world.

NewsCorp (the maker of the content) does NOT control the pricing at ANY store front except the one they might run. They do not dictate the price of the DVD set with Best Buy--Best Buy does. Why do they think they can tell Apple what the enduser price should be?

They can't. They can issue a suggested retail price of course. They can also set the wholesale price at $5 or $.05 if they so wished. Apple are then free to sell at $1.99 if they wish.
post #16 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by aegisdesign View Post

Consumers get to buy old shows for less and content producers get to shoot expensive shows without worrying about recouping costs at $1.99 a time.

This is exactly my problem with this whole thing. The iTunes market is a secondary market for the shows. The Studios make there money from advertising on air broadcasts, not selling the show on iTunes. The fact that they make ANY money from the show afterwards is all bonus. Without iTunes, there would be no secondary market for them to sell the shows at all! At .$.99 or $1.99, they have to be shoving that straight into there pockets. Any more and its greed!
post #17 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clalron View Post

NewsCorp (the maker of the content) does NOT control the pricing at ANY store front except the one they might run. They do not dictate the price of the DVD set with Best Buy--Best Buy does. Why do they think they can tell Apple what the enduser price should be?

Quote:
Originally Posted by aegisdesign View Post

They can't. They can issue a suggested retail price of course. They can also set the wholesale price at $5 or $.05 if they so wished. Apple are then free to sell at $1.99 if they wish.

Well, they have every right to not sell their product wholesale to a store that doesn't follow their preferred pricing structure. That's what Apple does. If an iPod costs $249 in the Apple Store, it will cost $249 at Best Buy, $249 at Radio Shack, $249 at Hal's Computer Warehouse online. If the reseller doesn't stick to Apple's pricing guidelines, it's goodbye wholesale deal from Apple. Apple is the only hardware company that does this so strictly.

It's all in the negotiation.
post #18 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by aegisdesign View Post

They can't. They can issue a suggested retail price of course. They can also set the wholesale price at $5 or $.05 if they so wished. Apple are then free to sell at $1.99 if they wish.

They often can't set a specific price, but the wholesale price is going to affect the retail price.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mopar003 View Post

This is exactly my problem with this whole thing. The iTunes market is a secondary market for the shows. The Studios make there money from advertising on air broadcasts, not selling the show on iTunes. The fact that they make ANY money from the show afterwards is all bonus. Without iTunes, there would be no secondary market for them to sell the shows at all! At .$.99 or $1.99, they have to be shoving that straight into there pockets. Any more and its greed!

A lot of the shows are available on DVD, often within a few months.
post #19 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by aegisdesign View Post

No. That's the market price. It doesn't necessarily equate to a 'fair' price.

Apple dictate not only the market price but by extension the fairness of the price. So, for a show that costs only thousands to make, the price is unfair to consumers and with a show that costs millions, it's unfair to producers.

As long as the average of $1.99 doesn't go up, I'd think Apple being a bit more flexible would be a good thing for everybody. Consumers get to buy old shows for less and content producers get to shoot expensive shows without worrying about recouping costs at $1.99 a time.

Thats interesting! In theory, there should be no such thing as a 'fair price'. If you, as creator or seller of a product, can not afford to sell at a price (because of cost of production), then you will be pushed out of the market. By definition, all market prices are 'fair prices' because they are set by supply and demand forces.

But I'll be the first to admit that there are problems with this model. It assumes that buyers and sellers can enter freely and there is some flexibility to the price. The fact that Apple is setting an inflexible price means that we can't find out whether theres a higher or lower price that would maximize returns for creators and sellers, while not losing significant customers. That price may be 1.75, or it may be 2.39. We don't know. So iTunes is really not allowing the market to develop, which may in the long run hurt customers because content that we may want to see won't show up if creators of content don't think the prices is 'fair'.

I think its a good idea for NBC to see what else they can get. If they succeed in charging a higher price, then Apple will raise prices to keep other studios and maybe lure back NBC. If it fails, then we know that either their price was too high, or people love iTunes. Either way, NBC comes back, other studios stay with Apple, and the price stays nice and low.
post #20 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

"Right now we have a perfectly good relationship with Apple," he said. "But let me say this, we're the ones who should determine what the fair price for our product is, not Apple."

Glad Fox is not being as ridiculous as NBC on this issue. The only problem it's not up to Apple or Fox, or any other company to determine what the "fair" price is. The consumer determines that.

We've been through this before with music. When the lables were selling bad music at an extremely high price, consumers decided that wasn't right and they would steal it instead (whether that's "right" or "wrong" is irrelevant to this discussion).

So the consumer will ultimately decide what a fair price for Movies and TV shows are as well. Read that open letter to NBC on TV Shows. Makes a great side point that until Apple put TV shows on iTunes no one thought that paying for them at all was even rationale, much less what price would be okay.

So Fox, NBC, all the other networks. They all need to stop pretending they have any leverage. Thier job is to make great programmiing. If people like it they will either get it for free (plus a monthly cable/sattelite bill, or even free over the air HD) or pay $1.99 or possibly now $0.99 per show.

Even though it looks like Apple is trying to set the price, their not. It's not their job either. They are trying to throw a dart on the price that the consumer thinks is fair. They started out at $1.99. They may go down to .99. They may bring it back up after that, who knows. But no one involved has true leverage, except the consumer. And you can't argue with that.
post #21 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by mopar003 View Post

This is exactly my problem with this whole thing. The iTunes market is a secondary market for the shows. The Studios make there money from advertising on air broadcasts, not selling the show on iTunes. The fact that they make ANY money from the show afterwards is all bonus. Without iTunes, there would be no secondary market for them to sell the shows at all! At .$.99 or $1.99, they have to be shoving that straight into there pockets. Any more and its greed!

Wrong. Maybe it is just my perception, but the studios may be taking along term approach here. Today this is incremental revenue, but perhaps in 2 or 3 years the the on-air broadcast is the incremental revenue. They should be thinking long term and establishing a model that can adjust as the market adjusts.

However, perhaps you are correct and the studios are planning this thing one month at a time.
post #22 of 42
Pricing is the cost of producing a product, plus a profit. Part of the pricing problem is to quit paying outrageous salaries to all Hollywooder's and Music Talent and lower the price. I'm sick of ball bouncers and canary voices making Millions, along with all the production companies. The price of a concert or sport event is way out of line with the average salary.
BUT... we must be all desperate, because we keep on paying the price.

Ol' Steve Jobs has created a fair price structure for a product that has been out of line for a long time and is trying to quell the stealing of artist works. Now the greedy studio's think they have us hooked and want to raise the bar.
I believe in fair pricing for all, but I don't have a CRIB on MTV and worked my tail off all my life... these stars and producers need to get a life like ours...

I just needed to RANT about the core of the problem.
post #23 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by mopar003 View Post

This is exactly my problem with this whole thing. The iTunes market is a secondary market for the shows. The Studios make there money from advertising on air broadcasts, not selling the show on iTunes. The fact that they make ANY money from the show afterwards is all bonus. Without iTunes, there would be no secondary market for them to sell the shows at all! At .$.99 or $1.99, they have to be shoving that straight into there pockets. Any more and its greed!

Thats true, and I agree with you as a customer.

But from the investor point of view, a market is a market, and content should be priced in a way that is consistent and doesn't cannibalize existing sales. And just because the content is digital, and it costs close to NOTHING to duplicate digital content, it still should be priced consistently with other versions of the same content (DVDs).
post #24 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by mopar003 View Post

This is exactly my problem with this whole thing. The iTunes market is a secondary market for the shows. The Studios make there money from advertising on air broadcasts, not selling the show on iTunes. The fact that they make ANY money from the show afterwards is all bonus. Without iTunes, there would be no secondary market for them to sell the shows at all! At .$.99 or $1.99, they have to be shoving that straight into there pockets. Any more and its greed!

Yes, they make money from advertising, but the value of the advertising goes down when less people start watching the show. If half the audience started buying the show from iTunes instead of watching it on the network, the value of the advertising has just dropped by 50%. Does the profit from iTunes cover that loss in revenue?

It's the same issue the networks have with Tivo and other DVRs (and VCRs). If people record the show and just skip the commericials, that advertising time has no value. Thus no revenue.
post #25 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by ntrpy View Post

Glad Fox is not being as ridiculous as NBC on this issue. The only problem it's not up to Apple or Fox, or any other company to determine what the "fair" price is. The consumer determines that.

In actuality the market sets the price - not the consumer, producer or distributor individually. Let's assume that you have a producer making the product (studios), a distributor bringing this product to the consumer (Apple, Amazon, etc.) and a consumer who uses the product (you and me). The producer will do his best to set the price to the distributor so that he can make as much money as possible. This is not being greedy - the company has shareholders and they deserve to make as much money as possible from the market. Note that most companies will try to maximize profit rather than revenue, but in a developing market this is not always true. Also, maximizing profit usually doesn't mean setting the highest price - you look at a price vs demand curve and plot sales/profit vs price. At some price the curve will reach a maximum and that is where you will likely set the price.

The distributor is usually just passing along their costs to the consumer plus a small margin for their profit. This can range from a few percent to 35 to 40% depending upon the market. In this case, I believe it is <10%, but I could be wrong.

The consumer will evaluate the product at the price that gets to them after passing through the distributor. If the price is higher than the perceived value, the product will not sell to that particular consumer. If the consumer feels the price/value is good, they will buy. The overall market is the group of consumers willing to pay the offered price to the distributor. If this market is not large enough, the producer will decide that they cannot make enough profit to recoup their investment. Therefore, they stop offering the product for sale.

Keep in mind that the overall market here is consumers who watch on TV (over the air, cable, satellite) plus those who watch on a producer website plus those willing to purchase/rent a DVD or an electronic form of the show. In the first two cases the studios make little money directly from the consumer - it actually comes from advertisers willing to pay the producers money to bundle their ads with the shows. Additional revenue comes from the distributors (cable/satellite) payments to the networks to carry their programs. In the last two cases, the consumer is actually paying the studio money to watch the product without paid advertisers.

Currently the market is trying to establish a balance between the different channels of distribution and the price for each. The studios could stop piracy immediately by offering the shows for free with no DRM through the distributors. In that case, the distributors don't make money and the studios don't make money. Why would they do this? In addition, the studios would then start to lose significant chunks of advertising revenue which today accounts for the bulk of their profits.

Apple's role is to facilitate this developing market while allowing the market to set a price. By establishing a firm price with no negotiating room they are preventing this from happening. walk into any music store. new releases are generally on sale to build hype for a few weeks. After that they go up to a high price. Over time, as sales fall off, the stores reduce the prices to unload the inventory. Evenutally they wind up in bargain bins for a few dollars. Why can't or shouldn't iTunes support this type of pricing model? I am not saying they should, but I want to know why they shouldn't. It seems to work for almost any other product.

Anyway, long enough post.
post #26 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by rabber View Post

In actuality the market sets the price - not the consumer, producer or distributor individually. Let's assume that you have a producer making the product (studios), a distributor bringing this product to the consumer (Apple, Amazon, etc.) and a consumer who uses the product (you and me). The producer will do his best to set the price to the distributor so that he can make as much money as possible. This is not being greedy - the company has shareholders and they deserve to make as much money as possible from the market. Note that most companies will try to maximize profit rather than revenue, but in a developing market this is not always true. Also, maximizing profit usually doesn't mean setting the highest price - you look at a price vs demand curve and plot sales/profit vs price. At some price the curve will reach a maximum and that is where you will likely set the price.

The distributor is usually just passing along their costs to the consumer plus a small margin for their profit. This can range from a few percent to 35 to 40% depending upon the market. In this case, I believe it is <10%, but I could be wrong.

The consumer will evaluate the product at the price that gets to them after passing through the distributor. If the price is higher than the perceived value, the product will not sell to that particular consumer. If the consumer feels the price/value is good, they will buy. The overall market is the group of consumers willing to pay the offered price to the distributor. If this market is not large enough, the producer will decide that they cannot make enough profit to recoup their investment. Therefore, they stop offering the product for sale.

Keep in mind that the overall market here is consumers who watch on TV (over the air, cable, satellite) plus those who watch on a producer website plus those willing to purchase/rent a DVD or an electronic form of the show. In the first two cases the studios make little money directly from the consumer - it actually comes from advertisers willing to pay the producers money to bundle their ads with the shows. Additional revenue comes from the distributors (cable/satellite) payments to the networks to carry their programs. In the last two cases, the consumer is actually paying the studio money to watch the product without paid advertisers.

Currently the market is trying to establish a balance between the different channels of distribution and the price for each. The studios could stop piracy immediately by offering the shows for free with no DRM through the distributors. In that case, the distributors don't make money and the studios don't make money. Why would they do this? In addition, the studios would then start to lose significant chunks of advertising revenue which today accounts for the bulk of their profits.

Apple's role is to facilitate this developing market while allowing the market to set a price. By establishing a firm price with no negotiating room they are preventing this from happening. walk into any music store. new releases are generally on sale to build hype for a few weeks. After that they go up to a high price. Over time, as sales fall off, the stores reduce the prices to unload the inventory. Evenutally they wind up in bargain bins for a few dollars. Why can't or shouldn't iTunes support this type of pricing model? I am not saying they should, but I want to know why they shouldn't. It seems to work for almost any other product.

Anyway, long enough post.

Exactly, as noted a few posts earlier:

Quote:
Originally Posted by bg_nyc View Post

Thats interesting! In theory, there should be no such thing as a 'fair price'. If you, as creator or seller of a product, can not afford to sell at a price (because of cost of production), then you will be pushed out of the market. By definition, all market prices are 'fair prices' because they are set by supply and demand forces.

But I'll be the first to admit that there are problems with this model. It assumes that buyers and sellers can enter freely and there is some flexibility to the price. The fact that Apple is setting an inflexible price means that we can't find out whether theres a higher or lower price that would maximize returns for creators and sellers, while not losing significant customers. That price may be 1.75, or it may be 2.39. We don't know. So iTunes is really not allowing the market to develop, which may in the long run hurt customers because content that we may want to see won't show up if creators of content don't think the prices is 'fair'.
post #27 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by bg_nyc View Post

Thats true, and I agree with you as a customer.

But from the investor point of view, a market is a market, and content should be priced in a way that is consistent and doesn't cannibalize existing sales. And just because the content is digital, and it costs close to NOTHING to duplicate digital content, it still should be priced consistently with other versions of the same content (DVDs).

I don't agree with that. If you're buying the shows on-line (like the iTMS), you're getting extra benefits you're not counting with 'other versions'. You can access the shows quicker (rather then the end of the season), convenience (sent right to your computer, no need to go to store, wait for disks to come in), plus extra costs (bandwidth does cost money, why don't people realize this?).
post #28 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Mac Guy View Post

Pricing is the cost of producing a product, plus a profit.

It doesn't work that way because the work has to be parceled out. Maybe a production company can do that, but the studio has to do the work of selling the product and takes on considerable risk in investing in a show. They lose money on some shows, and make it back on others.

Quote:
Part of the pricing problem is to quit paying outrageous salaries to all Hollywooder's and Music Talent and lower the price.

I have no idea who a hollywooder is in terms of your context. The big name talent does get a lot, but that's because their name helps make the sale to the public.

The "music talent" generally doesn't get much from music sales. I think that's unfortunate.

Quote:
I'm sick of ball bouncers and canary voices making Millions, along with all the production companies. The price of a concert or sport event is way out of line with the average salary.

That's off topic. In a sense, I agree, but I just choose not to go to those events.

Quote:
BUT... we must be all desperate, because we keep on paying the price.

There are plenty of other entertainment options. There are good shows that aren't on network/cable/satellite, and the NBA isn't the only way to watch a basket ball game.

Quote:
Ol' Steve Jobs has created a fair price structure for a product that has been out of line for a long time and is trying to quell the stealing of artist works. Now the greedy studio's think they have us hooked and want to raise the bar.

Since we don't know what happened in the NBC deal, that comment can easily be way off base. The public posturing might not have anything to do with the actual negotiations.
post #29 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by alienzed View Post

The extremely biased nature of the value of a television program contrasting the production company's wants and the consumers' desires stipulates that all programs should cost the same, otherwise, you're making the judgement call for someone else on what it is worth to them. That is hogwash, hogwash I say!

I don't know about you, but I find it unfair that one has to pay the same price for last night's episode of Heroes as one does for a 40 year old episode of Adam-12. And I'm pretty sure what brings this out is how little older content is available for sale. New stuff sells now, because people want to stay up-to-date and all, but older stuff is not going to sell at the same prices (and one would think digital distribution would be a boon to selling older content because of the low cost of distributtion).

And what production company's are saying they desire a single-price structure vs. variable pricing? Sure, the consumers say they want it (but they say that because they know they stuff they get now would cost more, so who wouldn't say that).

Quote:
Originally Posted by alienzed View Post

I hope youtube succeeds to the extent that all media becomes virtually free. Before television people were social and entertained each other, now we get to pay a faceless entity for mindless ADD relief.

Entertainment is rarely free, and rarely has been. YouTube's not free. People are paying for it (through advertising, just like free TV). But, guess what. If YouTube wins out, there's no more shows on the iTMS, so it doesn't matter anyway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Clalron View Post

Creator of Product -- sets the price retail buys the product for -- retail sets the price the consumer pays for it.

Oh yeah.. that is the value Apple is bringing to the mix--the storefront. You see--that's why Apple can dictate what the price is to the consumer.

Except the retailer is dictating to the producer what they will pay for the show, in order for them to sell it at the price they want. This isn't the way its supposed to work.

Quote:
Originally Posted by aegisdesign View Post

They can't. They can issue a suggested retail price of course. They can also set the wholesale price at $5 or $.05 if they so wished. Apple are then free to sell at $1.99 if they wish.

Not necessarily. Action could be taken against anyone for selling at below cost if its deemed as a measure to dump product or harm competition.
post #30 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by troberts View Post

P.S. How can the studios realistically complain when selling through the iTunes Store brings in additional revenue they would not be getting if they relied on the methods they used before using the iTunes Store?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mopar003 View Post

This is exactly my problem with this whole thing. The iTunes market is a secondary market for the shows. The Studios make there money from advertising on air broadcasts, not selling the show on iTunes. The fact that they make ANY money from the show afterwards is all bonus. Without iTunes, there would be no secondary market for them to sell the shows at all! At .$.99 or $1.99, they have to be shoving that straight into there pockets. Any more and its greed!

First off, you make it sound like $1.99 of pure profit is fine, but if they want $2.99, its 'greed'. Isn't wanting anything for it 'greed', since they're wanting money in the first place?

But, secondly, what you all are missing is that you think that TV shows have no value except for their ability to sell advertising. That's not entirely true. They also use shows that already have popularity to draw in viewers to other shows. They'll put some new series behind a popular show, or advertise during the show other shows, to try to get viewership all over. (This, BTW, is the reason they spend so much money on NFL football games. Its not so much that they make it all back in advertising, but it gives them the venue to advertise other shows and get the exposure to it.

This is part of the 'pairing' that was mentioned in the NBC commentary. Buying one show would get you an episode of another show. Even if only 5% of the audience of show A then watches show B, it can boost its ratings enough to warrant keeping it on the air. (You know, the same way when you get a DVD, and it has the "Also available" trailers on it)
post #31 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Louzer View Post

I don't agree with that. If you're buying the shows on-line (like the iTMS), you're getting extra benefits you're not counting with 'other versions'. You can access the shows quicker (rather then the end of the season), convenience (sent right to your computer, no need to go to store, wait for disks to come in), plus extra costs (bandwidth does cost money, why don't people realize this?).

What exactly didn't you agree with? You're discussing from the customer point of view... Yes, its a different product from the customer point of view, certaily different from a DVD. And you may be willing to pay a premium for the ability to access content quickly from your computer.

I was talking about the studio point of view. Yes, bandwith costs money, but studios care as much about that as they do about how much it cost to put 15 layers of packaging around a DVD. They are focused on the end price, and whether its competitively priced and allows them a minimum return.
post #32 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Louzer View Post

... what you all are missing is that you think that TV shows have no value except for their ability to sell advertising. That's not entirely true. They also use shows that already have popularity to draw in viewers to other shows. They'll put some new series behind a popular show, or advertise during the show other shows, to try to get viewership all over. (This, BTW, is the reason they spend so much money on NFL football games. Its not so much that they make it all back in advertising, but it gives them the venue to advertise other shows and get the exposure to it.

You're missing the fact that studios carefully weigh the benefit of putting an ad for 'Men in Trees' on during NFL games versus the huge sums of money they get from putting a 'GoDaddy.com' commercial on. At the end, they may allocate 5 seconds of each each 5-minute block to self-advertising. When '24' shows a 3-minute add during the superbowl, you can bet theres a hefty transfer price between the '24' advertising budget and NFL Sunday ad revenues. They pay dearly for that space. And remember, they only reason they want people to watch '24' is so they can sell high-priced advertising space there too!

So yes, the ONLY reason TV shows exist for the networks is to sell advertising space. They don't try to increase viewership for the sake of viewership!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Louzer View Post

This is part of the 'pairing' that was mentioned in the NBC commentary. Buying one show would get you an episode of another show. Even if only 5% of the audience of show A then watches show B, it can boost its ratings enough to warrant keeping it on the air. (You know, the same way when you get a DVD, and it has the "Also available" trailers on it)

And why do you want to boost ratings? So you can boost the price of advertising space!
post #33 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by suhail View Post

if it's not on iTunes, I'll get it for free from somewhere else.

I think for many the inverse applies... "If it's not available free, I'll get it on iTunes." Steve already knows that a minority of content on the average i(insert device name here) was purchased.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #34 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

I think for many the inverse applies... "If it's not available free, I'll get it on iTunes." Steve already knows that a minority of content on the average i(insert device name here) was purchased.

Good point!

As far as music goes, I know many folks without scruples look at every illegitimate source first. When they exhaust their options, they go the legitimate route, and iTunes is the easy choice. You're right, Jobs knows this. Thats why he wants the record companies to drop DRM. Its pretty useless as a barrier to copyright infringement.
post #35 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by bg_nyc View Post

You're missing the fact that studios carefully weigh the benefit of putting an ad for 'Men in Trees' on during NFL games versus the huge sums of money they get from putting a 'GoDaddy.com' commercial on.

Well, for one, I can't imagine them ever putting an ad for a show like Men In Trees on during a football game (24 would be more their style, its all about demographics you know).

Quote:
Originally Posted by bg_nyc View Post

At the end, they may allocate 5 seconds of each each 5-minute block to self-advertising. When '24' shows a 3-minute add during the superbowl, you can bet theres a hefty transfer price between the '24' advertising budget and NFL Sunday ad revenues. They pay dearly for that space. And remember, they only reason they want people to watch '24' is so they can sell high-priced advertising space there too!

Oh, its a lot more then that. Just watch normal TV, and almost every ad block ends in an ad for an upcoming show. Usually in the 30 second to minute frame. And lest we forget the wonderful invention of the in-show advertisement.

Football is a little different, because they have the advantage of lots of dead time (amazing how people talk about football being so much more exciting than 'soccer' when the spurts in football are just so short vs. the huge lag times of just nothingness - which is why they invented instant replay and cheerleaders - to keep men entertained) and can pimp shows also during that "Don't forget to watch a whole new episode of CSI: Deluth, Tuesday, on CBS".

Quote:
Originally Posted by bg_nyc View Post

So yes, the ONLY reason TV shows exist for the networks is to sell advertising space. They don't try to increase viewership for the sake of viewership!

I think some of that's very disengenuous. You don't think some shows get put on, and kept on, because people believe they're actually good shows and worth broadcasting? Yes, they want to sell advertising (otherwise they lose money and go bankrupt). But there are shows that stay on even though the viewership isn't there.

We all know there's many a filmmaker, musical artist, etc, who make niche products. But they make them anyway, because they believe in what they're doing. But they still need someone to finance them to make their 'masterpiece'. Who's doing that? You're TV networks, film studios, record labels (not so much on the last one anymore). And how do they pay for it? Usually through the excessive profits they make off the 'blockbusters' and pop icons.
post #36 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by bg_nyc View Post

Good point!

As far as music goes, I know many folks without scruples look at every illegitimate source first. When they exhaust their options, they go the legitimate route, and iTunes is the easy choice. You're right, Jobs knows this. Thats why he wants the record companies to drop DRM. Its pretty useless as a barrier to copyright infringement.

Why does Jobs' pushing to drop DRM have to do with those who won't buy unless they can't get it anywhere? Apparently I'm too stupid to see the connection you're trying to make.
post #37 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Louzer View Post

Oh, its a lot more then that. Just watch normal TV, and almost every ad block ends in an ad for an upcoming show. Usually in the 30 second to minute frame. And lest we forget the wonderful invention of the in-show advertisement.

I knew you would mention that. Those upcoming show ads are usually at the end of a 4-5 minute block of 3rd party commercials, and at the time when space is less valuable (people are on their way from the kitchen or toilet).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Louzer View Post

...(amazing how people talk about football being so much more exciting than 'soccer' when the spurts in football are just so short vs. the huge lag times of just nothingness - which is why they invented instant replay and cheerleaders - to keep men entertained) and can pimp shows also during that "Don't forget to watch a whole new episode of CSI: Deluth, Tuesday, on CBS".

That kind of advertising is not sold with 'time slots' and guarantees like 'this will air during a 30-second time out in the 4th quarter'. Its more informal. But i cant disagree with you about the huge time lags of nothingness. Thats why I need to Tivo and step in 45 minutes into the game.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Louzer View Post

I think some of that's very disengenuous. You don't think some shows get put on, and kept on, because people believe they're actually good shows and worth broadcasting? Yes, they want to sell advertising (otherwise they lose money and go bankrupt). But there are shows that stay on even though the viewership isn't there.

We all know there's many a filmmaker, musical artist, etc, who make niche products. But they make them anyway, because they believe in what they're doing. But they still need someone to finance them to make their 'masterpiece'. Who's doing that? You're TV networks, film studios, record labels (not so much on the last one anymore). And how do they pay for it? Usually through the excessive profits they make off the 'blockbusters' and pop icons....

Name one show that stayed on a major network (NBC, CBS, ABC or FOX) for more than 6 episodes that was at the same time getting bad Nielsen ratings. And HBO shows don't count because they are financed by subscription. Films and records are a bit different from TV because they can be made with a reduced budget and marketed carefully to appeal to certain crowds. For example, look at My Greek Wedding. Yes it was a hit, but started out small and marketed as a small independent in just a few theaters.

A TV show on a major network, however, is by definition made to appeal to mainstream. Everyone watches the same networks at the same time. Theres no way to differentiate your viewership and offer different things to different people. Networks would love to have a station full of mass-appeal hits, and will keep searching for the next '24' or 'Lost', and meanwhile cancell perfectly good shows because of lackluster ratings. Dont' you agree that you have seen this?

Thats also why Latino and African American shows can't succeed. Its not always because they are bad shows. Its also because the mainstream doesn't want to see a show about 4 black women (Girlfriends). So it gets relegated to Sunday nights on the CW network (where EVERY show is made to appeal to a specific target demographic). And meanwhile there is not ONE show with multiple (more than 2) African American or Latino cast members on NBC, ABC, or CBS (except maybe Grays Anatomy, which has a Black female head writer).
post #38 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by suhail View Post

if it's not on iTunes, I'll get it for free from somewhere else.

yes and seeing that we cant get movies here in Canada WE will TO'RENT
until iTunes come.
sorry nbs/fox /abc and the others
post #39 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by aegisdesign View Post

They can't. They can issue a suggested retail price of course. They can also set the wholesale price at $5 or $.05 if they so wished. Apple are then free to sell at $1.99 if they wish.

They can, actually -- at least insofar as antitrust law is concerned. The Supreme Court this past term overruled a line of cases that had prohibited manufacturers from dictating prices to retailers.

This is all contractual. Apple and FOX can agree to charge or package content anyway they want to. If they don't agree, then no FOX content on iTunes. If they do agree, then the content is available on terms mutually acceptable to Apple and FOX. Simple as that.
post #40 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Louzer View Post

Why does Jobs' pushing to drop DRM have to do with those who won't buy unless they can't get it anywhere? Apparently I'm too stupid to see the connection you're trying to make.

Well, my point was that DRM doesn't stop unauthorized duplication. Like I said, Jobs was pushing companies to drop it because it is worthless, and management of Apple's Fairplay DRM system is more headaches than its worth. And, some people use iTunes as a last resort. maybe without DRM they can sell a bit more.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPod + iTunes + AppleTV
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPod + iTunes + AppleTV › NewsCorp (Fox) says it won't join NBC's iTunes walkout