or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › iPod touch tear-down with high-quality internal photos
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

iPod touch tear-down with high-quality internal photos

post #1 of 41
Thread Starter 
Apple's sleek, touchscreen-based iPod Touch player looks a lot like the iPhone, but a fresh disassembly has revealed a surprising number of internal differences, including a more easily repairable display component.

Once again, props go out to iFixIt for being first to to the punch with its tear-down of the new Apple video player. The firm says it plans to sell replacement parts for the Touch, just as it does for other iPods, iPhones, and Apple's notebook lines.

The tear-down

At 8mm thick and 4.2 ounces, the iPod Touch is smaller and lighter than the iPhone, which measures 11.6mm and weighs in at 4.8 ounces. The Touch is also 0.2 inches (5 mm) shorter than its older cousin.

Similar to the new iPod nano, the Touch's rear panel is shiny (scratch-prone) aluminum and is secured to the face of the unit via metal tabs.





The iPod Touch doesn't need a large speaker or microphone, so the battery occupies a larger portion of the internals than the iPhone's battery.



There are no wires connecting the rear panel to the iPod. Apple uses an elegant contact connection to make assembly and disassembly easier. (The circled points are contacts for the WiFi antenna.)



The large, but thin battery is soldered to the logic board, like the iPhone and many of Apple's recent iPods.



The iPod's huge touch-display lies beneath the battery, while the logic board is beneath the metal shield at the top of the image (under the 2D barcode). According to iFixIt, the Touch's battery is 54.0 x 64.1 x 2.8 mm, while the iPhone battery is 43.6 x 50.5 x 5.4 mm. That puts the volume of the Touch battery (9588 mm^3) at 81 percent of that of the iPhone (11780 mm^3).



Near the top of the logic board, Apple has sandwiched several components, including a company-branded ARM chip and the stacked Toshiba -- not Samsung -- flash chips.



Lifting the logic board up reveals a small antenna connect board that contacts the antenna.





In the below photo, iFixIt rotated the logic board upwards and used a spudger to pry up the printed circuit board (PCB) underneath the logic board. This board likely houses the components for processing touch screen input, the firm says. Also apparent from the image is a Foxconn stamp on the dock connector. Apple has used the Taiwanese manufacturer extensively to assemble its iPod lines.



The Touch's display processing board is attached near the bottom of the primary logic board. The ribbon cables are soldered into each board, so you cannot easily replace just one of the boards . You can also see the headphone jack on the lower-right side of the logic board. Apple has decided to integrate it into the logic board, which may make repair more difficult, according to iFixIt.



The image below shows the top of both boards. You can see the Wolfson chip to the left of the flash memory. This is interesting, notes iFixIt, because the iPod Classic has a Cirrus audio chip, which has caused some initial concerns about audio quality. The iPod touch should not suffer from these problems, the firm says, as the Wolfson chip is the same as that in the iPhone, WM8758BG.

The Toshiba flash has part # TH58NVG5D4CTG20. Since iFixIt's Touch model was an 8 GB iPod, each of those stacks has 32 Gb (4 GB) of memory.

The Apple-branded ARM has chip markings 339S0029ARM 8900B 0731 NOKCYY2, while the on-stack memory has markings K4X1GA53PE-XGC3 YME097N6 731. The K4 indicates this is Samsung memory, so iFixIt believes the chip is probably Samsung manufactured just like the iPhone.

A comparison of Touch and iPhone processor markings. Touch: 339S0029ARM 8900B; iPhone: 339S0030ARM 8900B (very similar) Touch: 0731 (manufactured week 31 of 2007) iPhone: 0719 (week 19 of 2007). Touch: NOKCYY2 iPhone: NOD4BZ02.

iFixIt says the last number is probably a lot id, which explains why they are so different. But in general, the iPod Touch and iPhone processors are very, very similar.



The Touch's display attachment is completely different from the iPhone, and is attached to the front of the iPod by 16 Phillips #00 screws. On the iPhone, the display and front bezel are fused together with very strong adhesive which makes it impossible to separate the display from the from glass.

iFixit believes the Touch's display design will make for easier repairs, as removing the display is very doable. "The LCD just comes right out after you remove the screws."



The touch-screen LCD picture on the left, and display bezel on the right.



iFixit's iPod touch take-apart guide. iFixIt also recently tore down Apple's new iPod nano and iPod Classic.
post #2 of 41
I love how so many people were complaining about no being able to replace batteries on the iPhone and then Apple goes ahead and continues on to the iPod Touch and does the same thing. I love it! Even iPods for the longest time have been equiped with a non-replaceable battery. Just goes to show you that Apple doesn't care how many of you guys complain about it because they have very high hopes and expectations of the device that has worked well for them in the past.
Reply
Reply
post #3 of 41
Quote:
the Touch's battery is 54.0 x 64.1 x 2.8 mm, while the iPhone battery is 43.6 x 50.5 x 5.4 mm. That puts the volume of the Touch battery (9588 mm^3) at 81 percent of that of the iPhone (11780 mm^3).

Is it too early in the morning for me or is that backwards? Seems to me that that makes the iPhone 81% of the Touch.
post #4 of 41
I think somebody has either messed up the measurements, or messed up the maths. The touch has a larger battery than the iPhone, I know that much.
post #5 of 41
The iPod touch battery is about half as thick as the iPhone battery...
post #6 of 41
The key word is "thinner."

Larger doesn't mean crap; sure the touch is wider and longer, but it is half the thinness of the iPhone.

-=|Mgkwho
post #7 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQB View Post

Is it too early in the morning for me or is that backwards? Seems to me that that makes the iPhone 81% of the Touch.

The numbers work out to 9,661.92 for the iTouch, and 11,889.72 for the iPhone, if the dimensions given are correct.

I don't know why my multiplication is off from theirs, assuming they used those dimensions to calculate from, but mine are correct.

Whether the battery dimensions were reversed, I don't know.
post #8 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Footloose301 View Post

I love how so many people were complaining about no being able to replace batteries on the iPhone and then Apple goes ahead and continues on to the iPod Touch and does the same thing. I love it! Even iPods for the longest time have been equiped with a non-replaceable battery. Just goes to show you that Apple doesn't care how many of you guys complain about it because they have very high hopes and expectations of the device that has worked well for them in the past.

While there always be complaints, I don't think the iPhone complaints would be so bad if they didn't charge extra for a loaner, for battery replacement or warranty work. It looks like they charge for the loaner even if you bought Applecare.

I think most people can live without a music device for a week, but a week without a phone is a different matter, most people seem to just forgo land lines and such now.
post #9 of 41
So no place for bluetooth in there, eh?
post #10 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

While there always be complaints, I don't think the iPhone complaints would be so bad if they didn't charge extra for a loaner, for battery replacement or warranty work, even if you bought Applecare.

I think most people can live without a music device for a week, but a week without a phone is a different matter, most people seem to just forgo land lines and such now.

I agree with that. It's probably a liability or insurance thing though.
post #11 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buck View Post

So no place for bluetooth in there, eh?

Doesn't appear to be and that frankly is very sad. I was certainly expecting more out of this device, may very well have to wait for an updated iPhone.

Dave
post #12 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Doesn't appear to be and that frankly is very sad. I was certainly expecting more out of this device, may very well have to wait for an updated iPhone.

Dave

Like what ? Make the coffee ? Walk the dog ?

Back on planet earth, we tend to have more realistic expectations of a device that us called, and marketed as, an iPod
post #13 of 41
Quote:
Like what ? Make the coffee ? Walk the dog ?

How about music-vibration mode?
post #14 of 41
The battery is soldered to the logic board? Am I the only one who sees the "Do not heat above 60C/140F" warning on the battery?
post #15 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gee4orce View Post

Like what ? Make the coffee ? Walk the dog ?

Back on planet earth, we tend to have more realistic expectations of a device that us called, and marketed as, an iPod


Yeah, its other worldly to have bluetooth stereo headsets that could connect to an ipod touch with bluetooth.
post #16 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avor View Post

The battery is soldered to the logic board? Am I the only one who sees the "Do not heat above 60C/140F" warning on the battery?

Why would you want to heat this above 140°?
post #17 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

While there always be complaints, I don't think the iPhone complaints would be so bad if they didn't charge extra for a loaner, for battery replacement or warranty work. It looks like they charge for the loaner even if you bought Applecare. I think most people can live without a music device for a week, but a week without a phone is a different matter, most people seem to just forgo land lines and such now.

I've lived without a landline for over a decade, but I also saw reports indicating that a large majority of people still have them. Does anyone have statistics (or know where to find them) about percentages of people without landlines?
post #18 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimDreamworx View Post

I've lived without a landline for over a decade, but I also saw reports indicating that a large majority of people still have them. Does anyone have statistics (or know where to find them) about percentages of people without landlines?

I've never understood giving up your landline. When we had a power blackout here a few years ago, the cells quickly became inoperative. But, if you plugged a phone that didn't need separate connection to the power line, it would work just fine.

The same thing for VOIP. If your internet connection is down for whatever reason, so is your phone.

It's like insurance. you only need it when you need it. But when you need it, you need it, as Yogi would say.

I prefer using it when at home.
post #19 of 41
Touch me...how can it be...believe me...the sun always shines on TV.
post #20 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I think most people can live without a music device for a week, but a week without a phone is a different matter, most people seem to just forgo land lines and such now.

Now why would they be without a phone? Oh, I guess those that switched to AT&T did so without getting one of the FREE PHONES. That's their fault not Apples/AT&T. Remember that you can put the iPhone SIM card in another phone just not the other way around. So if they we're smart and got the free phone then they have a backup.
post #21 of 41
this should be in the iPod thread? no?

Nov '09 | iMac 21.5" C2D 3.06 Ghz | Intel 330 240GB SSD | ATI

Sep '12| Toshiba 14" 1366 x 768! | i5 3rd Gen 6GB| Intel x25-m 120GB SSD | Win 7|  Viewsonic VX2255wmb 22" LCD
iPhone 4S| iPad 2 wifi

Reply

Nov '09 | iMac 21.5" C2D 3.06 Ghz | Intel 330 240GB SSD | ATI

Sep '12| Toshiba 14" 1366 x 768! | i5 3rd Gen 6GB| Intel x25-m 120GB SSD | Win 7|  Viewsonic VX2255wmb 22" LCD
iPhone 4S| iPad 2 wifi

Reply
post #22 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timon View Post

Now why would they be without a phone? Oh, I guess those that switched to AT&T did so without getting one of the FREE PHONES. That's their fault not Apples/AT&T. Remember that you can put the iPhone SIM card in another phone just not the other way around. So if they we're smart and got the free phone then they have a backup.

Um, what? For the people that had the forsight to switch to AT&T two years ago? Those "free" phones aren't.
post #23 of 41
Right, no blueteeth, and it also eems the design team left no room for an external volume +/- or mute or no facility on a nifty headset, like the iPhone, to change tracks etc. Curious to hear from those who are using the touch in daylight how easy it is to nav.

oh yeah, when will someone PLEASE make flash card slots to go along w/ battery slots? Is it me, or does 8/16GB seem like just enough to store 500 songs and your wedding reception cake cutting?
post #24 of 41
Don't you love how people can afford to rip apart a brand new product to the point where it most likely is unusable? Not to mention differently voiding the warranty Just glad it's not on my wallet!
post #25 of 41
People were demanding this device as soon as the iPhone came out. Apple has with its introduction of the new iPods listened to the costumers for once (they were demanding a nano with video, check, a classic iPod with lots of storage, check, and a iPhone without the phone, check). Those empty spaces on the home screen will be used some day, heck it has MAC OS!!! Don't blame apple of finally delivering a choice in iPods, it's the best thing they did in a long while. If people keep on nagging this move, we will never see a mid tower or a ultra small computer from Apple. All revA problems will be sorted out.
post #26 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Feynman View Post

Don't you love how people can afford to rip apart a brand new product to the point where it most likely is unusable? Not to mention differently voiding the warranty Just glad it's not on my wallet!

I think the point is that it can be reassembled. I think iFixit is known for selling iPod replacement parts.
post #27 of 41
Interesting...Toshiba flash.
post #28 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by kamjam View Post

oh yeah, when will someone PLEASE make flash card slots to go along w/ battery slots? Is it me, or does 8/16GB seem like just enough to store 500 songs and your wedding reception cake cutting?

Kinda like a replaceable battery...larger form factor for the door and such.

But with wireless, as long as you have the internet you can likely stream what you need and eventually resynch.
post #29 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I've never understood giving up your landline. When we had a power blackout here a few years ago, the cells quickly became inoperative. But, if you plugged a phone that didn't need separate connection to the power line, it would work just fine.

The same thing for VOIP. If your internet connection is down for whatever reason, so is your phone.

It's like insurance. you only need it when you need it. But when you need it, you need it, as Yogi would say.

I prefer using it when at home.

Not that land lines are bad...

But for most people mobile phones are just as reliable as land lines. The reason why many people ditch the land line? Money. If your mobile phone works 99.99% of the time, it isn't worth paying for a land line.

On top of that, now that i've got FIOS the land line no longer provides a fall-back in case of power outage. After the FOIS UPS in my basement is sucked dry, no more phone service. Yeah, that's right. I had em rip the copper clean off my house. I'm guessing the old lines dated from the 30s. They still had a party line filter in the basement. Mmmm, individually insulated conductors each a quarter inch across. Three to a twisted bundle.
post #30 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfiler View Post

Not that land lines are bad...

But for most people mobile phones are just as reliable as land lines. The reason why many people ditch the land line? Money. If your mobile phone works 99.99% of the time, it isn't worth paying for a land line.

On top of that, now that i've got FIOS the land line no longer provides a fall-back in case of power outage. After the FOIS UPS in my basement is sucked dry, no more phone service. Yeah, that's right. I had em rip the copper clean off my house. I'm guessing the old lines dated from the 30s. They still had a party line filter in the basement. Mmmm, individually insulated conductors each a quarter inch across. Three to a twisted bundle.

Things change. With FIOS, you've got a back-up that will last a few hours.

But, land lines are still, by far, the most reliable of all the services. Also, one of the cheapest, except for long distance.
post #31 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfiler View Post

Not that land lines are bad...

But for most people mobile phones are just as reliable as land lines. The reason why many people ditch the land line? Money. If your mobile phone works 99.99% of the time, it isn't worth paying for a land line.

On top of that, now that i've got FIOS the land line no longer provides a fall-back in case of power outage. After the FOIS UPS in my basement is sucked dry, no more phone service. Yeah, that's right. I had em rip the copper clean off my house. I'm guessing the old lines dated from the 30s. They still had a party line filter in the basement. Mmmm, individually insulated conductors each a quarter inch across. Three to a twisted bundle.

Quote:
Telephone service in some parts of Vermont could be at risk due to the massive April snow storm which caused continuing power outages.

Verizon spokeswoman Jill Wurm said that the company's land lines are dependent on electricity at substations to continue operating. Each substation is equipped with back-up batteries which can continue operating for between four and eight hours, but as parts of the state remain without power for longer periods crews must bring generators out to re-charge the batteries, she said

...

Cellular towers which provide coverage for mobile phones also rely on generators or battery power if utility power is lost.

Roughly 95 percent of the cellular sites Verizon Wireless has across New England have built-in generators which automatically kick in if commercial power is lost, Spokesman Mike Murphy said. Those generators power batteries, which can also be recharged with mobile generators in necessary, Murphy said.

"We anticipate being able to ride out the storm and continue to provide service," he said.

http://www.rutlandherald.com/apps/pb.../70416006/1002

My FiOS runs more than 4-8 hours so in a regional as opposed to local blackout I have as much backup power as a normal land line. For a local blackout...I can buy my own generator if I feel the need and I have the FiOS UPS plugged into my own UPS (how I get more than 4-8 hours) because...what the heck, I need to power the Vonage router anyway. The FiOS, Vonage router and my wireless phone base station all sit on an UPS.

As far as recharging the cell phone I have 3 options: UPS, then car, then emergency radio with hand crank that trickle charges.

If I'm REALLY into disaster planning, I have a $30/month emergency contract and an Iridium phone. Of course the phone costs me a grand too. But for $360 a year and $1000 that gives me...I dunno...a reasonable expectation of being able to communicate even after a Katrina like event. Not many folks do that though. Heck not many keep 3 days worth of food and water. I sure don't. Food yes. Water depends on when the last time I bought a case of water was.
post #32 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Things change. With FIOS, you've got a back-up that will last a few hours.

But, land lines are still, by far, the most reliable of all the services. Also, one of the cheapest, except for long distance.

I'm not sure if disagreeing or not.

I was responding to you're comment "I've never understood giving up your landline." My response wasn't an attempt to convince you to drop your land line, but to clue you in on why others have. Or perhaps you already understood.
post #33 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfiler View Post

I'm not sure if disagreeing or not.

I was responding to you're comment "I've never understood giving up your landline." My response wasn't an attempt to convince you to drop your land line, but to clue you in on why others have. Or perhaps you already understood.

Sure. I know why they do. But, I'm not convinced that the time is ripe for it yet. In another five years, possibly. But cell service hasn't reached many outlying areas, and it may never reach them. VIOP is unreliable. as anything to do with the internet, will be.
post #34 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I've never understood giving up your landline. When we had a power blackout here a few years ago, the cells quickly became inoperative. But, if you plugged a phone that didn't need separate connection to the power line, it would work just fine.

For me, it's a matter of not getting the land line in the first place.

Cell towers should have power backup, I think they do in my area. I'm not sure what sort of power backup that phone systems need, but I'm pretty sure they too have finite resilience to major power outages, I'd think that eventually the power that runs the switches goes out.

Quote:
I prefer using it when at home.

I'd like to, but then I'd be paying two phone bills.
post #35 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

For me, it's a matter of not getting the land line in the first place.

Cell towers should have power backup, I think they do in my area. I'm not sure what sort of power backup that phone systems need, but I'm pretty sure they too have finite resilience to major power outages, I'd think that eventually the power that runs the switches goes out.

Most cell towers that do have backup, have only enough for a few hours.

Of course, very few cell phone owners have any backup for their phones, so even if the towers continue to work for a while, their phones won't.


Quote:
I'd like to, but then I'd be paying two phone bills.

I don't mind the extra $33 a month I pay. It's unlimited calls, and time, in the local area codes, which covers most everyone I would need to speak to.
post #36 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Sure. I know why they do. But, I'm not convinced that the time is ripe for it yet. In another five years, possibly. But cell service hasn't reached many outlying areas, and it may never reach them. VIOP is unreliable. as anything to do with the internet, will be.

That makes sense, but only if your goal is to come up with a blanket statement to characterize the entire market for phone service. In an effort to do this, it seems that you're questioning the rationality of people who have dropped their land line.
post #37 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfiler View Post

That makes sense, but only if your goal is to come up with a blanket statement to characterize the entire market for phone service. In an effort to do this, it seems that you're questioning the rationality of people who have dropped their land line.

No. I'm not questioning their rationality. I may be questioning their rational.

The truth is that most people don't think the issue to its logical conclusion. They see what seems to be a good idea, and go with it.

Around the world, we here in the US have a reputation for going with whatever is both the cheapest, and easiest.

I'm not saying that applies to everyone, of course.
post #38 of 41
Wow, you've gone in so many negative directions.

Rest assured, it is best for some people to have a mobile but no land line.
post #39 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfiler View Post

Wow, you've gone in so many negative directions.

Rest assured, it is best for some people to have a mobile but no land line.

I try to be a realist. I could give reasons, but I doubt it would be useful on this forum.
post #40 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

The numbers work out to 9,661.92 for the iTouch, and 11,889.72 for the iPhone, if the dimensions given are correct.

I don't know why my multiplication is off from theirs, assuming they used those dimensions to calculate from, but mine are correct.

Whether the battery dimensions were reversed, I don't know.

The difference could be because the batteries aren't perfectly cuboid. They have rounded edges.

Someone probably did a water displacement test or something!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › iPod touch tear-down with high-quality internal photos