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iPhone changes with Leopard release?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
So October is almost here and Leopard should get released soon...what does this mean for the iPhone? It makes total sense now that I think about it that so many features were left out of the phone to just have to be updated with Leopard. To me it's the perfect time to add ichat, photobooth, new widgets and a lot of other features to the phone. What do you guys think?
post #2 of 12
I completely Agree!!!!
post #3 of 12
Well, at the very least, I would expect that notes and to do's will be updated to reflect Mail 3.0. Also, remember that there's an update right around the corner to add the W-Fi Music Store.
post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikecrucial View Post

...what does this mean for the iPhone? ...

The iPhone is a cellphone which runs a version of Leopard as its OS. It is not a Mac peripheral. The iPhone is fully functional for both Mac and Windows users. It makes precious little sense to change the device when the desktop version of the OS is updated. Not all Mac users in the iPhone customer base will update their computers to MacOS X 10.5. None of the Windows users will update their computers to MacOS X 10.5.
post #5 of 12
You got a point. But a big issue with Mac users and cell phones is the difficulty in syncing contacts, events and notes between the Mac and the cell phone. It would make sense for Apple to make this as easy as they can with their cell phone. Plus, originally Leopard was to come out before the iPhone, so again there could be there could be unreleased features that need Leopard for the cell phone to work as desired. And don't forget the halo factor, while Apple can update iTunes so that PC users can use these features, Apple could reserve the best experience to be with a Mac.
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post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Me View Post

The iPhone is a cellphone which runs a version of Leopard as its OS. It is not a Mac peripheral. The iPhone is fully functional for both Mac and Windows users. It makes precious little sense to change the device when the desktop version of the OS is updated. Not all Mac users in the iPhone customer base will update their computers to MacOS X 10.5. None of the Windows users will update their computers to MacOS X 10.5.

Wait, so you're saying that with the release of Leopard, we should not expect any new changes, updates or additions to the iPhone's apps like Mail and Mail syncing or the addition of To-dos in conjunction with Mail?

And what about .Mac?

Are you also infering that the iPhone will not gain some degree of connectivity to .Mac soon after the release of Leopard?

And What about "Back To My Mac"?

I think these are all highly probable and do not necessitate the need for Leopard - well except for "Back To My Mac". But I still think even this will bring some new capabilities to the iPhone as an exclusive to Mac users.
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by rongold View Post

Wait, so you're saying that with the release of Leopard, we should not expect any new changes, updates or additions to the iPhone's apps like Mail and Mail syncing or the addition of To-dos in conjunction with Mail?

...

The iPhone is already running Leopard. With the release of MacOS X 10.5, the Mac will catch-up with the iPhone rather than leaving it behind. You seem to be laboring under the false assumption that an upgrade of the iPhone's OS is required to update and extend its applications. Not true.
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Me View Post

The iPhone is already running Leopard. With the release of MacOS X 10.5, the Mac will catch-up with the iPhone rather than leaving it behind. You seem to be laboring under the false assumption that an upgrade of the iPhone's OS is required to update and extend its applications. Not true.

At some point Apple is going to create links to the MAC OS X that will not be supported by MS Windows. They are in the business of selling software and hardware and I am sure they are going to try and use this iPhone as a way to convert MS users to Apple/Mac users. So I am sure we are going to see Apple start selling iPhone apps just like ring tones and many of these apps are going to work hand and hand with the OS X and other Apple software on the desktop and notebook computers. It would be stupid if Apple did not take this path.

What are you going to do if the new iPhone firmware update comes out and has a bunch of new features that are designed to work with Leopard if you happen to have it on your Mac? Do you think that won't make people want to purchase the new OS X even more..... It helps provide the reason to upgrade.... and what does it mean to Apple they make a lot more $$$$$$$!
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gizmo-xl View Post

At some point Apple is going to create links to the MAC OS X that will not be supported by MS Windows. ...

Did Steve Jobs tell you this over beers or while on the golf course?
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
I'm not trying to say that its going to need anything from
leopard to make it any better but that the release of Leopard brings a new slew of features that the iPhone can obviously take advantage of. And if those features are I my available on a mac, bonus.
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Me View Post

Did Steve Jobs tell you this over beers or while on the golf course?

Use this example Apple sells 3 million iphones out of those iphone owners 1 million of them use Apple computers.

Apple creates a great todo list and calendar application for the iphone that is much better than the one it comes with and sell it for 9.99 and 1 million iphone owners buy it. Or maybe they decide to create a mail program that you can purchase that replaces the one shipped with it to support MS and the other 2 million iphone owners buy it.

Apple is in the business of getting our money in their pockets and making stock holders money. If you take the above example and apply it to his sales goals you can see it becomes a huge cash flow for Apple. Could even get to the point Apple starts charging for OS upgrades like they do for the computers.... Think about it.... they sell 25 million phones and every year they release a new OS for the phone for 20.00 that's 500,000,000.00 in sales if you ran Apple what would you do?
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Me View Post

The iPhone is a cellphone which runs a version of Leopard as its OS. It is not a Mac peripheral. The iPhone is fully functional for both Mac and Windows users. It makes precious little sense to change the device when the desktop version of the OS is updated. Not all Mac users in the iPhone customer base will update their computers to MacOS X 10.5. None of the Windows users will update their computers to MacOS X 10.5.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Me View Post

The iPhone is already running Leopard. With the release of MacOS X 10.5, the Mac will catch-up with the iPhone rather than leaving it behind. You seem to be laboring under the false assumption that an upgrade of the iPhone's OS is required to update and extend its applications. Not true.

I may be in a feisty mood but you seem to have missed my point and have chosen to improperly proclaim my statements as incorrect. How ironic.

No, the iPhone is not running Leopard as you say. It is running OS X, but not the particular variant called Leopard. Leopard is generation 6 of the desktop version of OS X.

OS X is what drives all of Apple's new generation of products: MacBooks, Mac Book Pros, iMacs, Mac minis, Mac Pros, Apple TV, Airport Extreme, iPod Touch and the iPhone. All utilize OS X; BUT, not all utilize the same VARIANT of OS X. Different products require different parts of OS X.


And I'm not "laboring under the false assumption that an upgrade of the iPhone's OS is required to update and extend its applications". In fact; I specifically said: "changes, updates or additions to the iPhone's apps". Apps means applications, not the OS. I see now that if you understood my reference to Leopard as refering to an iPhone OS upgrade, it would seem that I would be ill-informed. But this is not the case.

Leopard (the desktop OS due in about a month) will enable new iPhone functionality (and the iPhone OS may or may not need upgraded to enable these functions). I guarantee it. Maybe the new Dashcode (which we will see with Leopard) will enable new iPhone functionality. Maybe the new Mail (which we will see with Leopard) will enable new tied-in "ToDo" functionality. Maybe the new "Back to My Mac" (which we will see with Leopard) will enable new interoperability with .Mac AND maybe even our desktops someday. And speaking of new .Mac functionality found with Leopard, maybe we will see new Calendar/iCal functionality with .Mac possibly acting as a iCal Server (which we will see with Leopard).
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