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A comprehensive list of Leopard features and surprises

post #1 of 76
Thread Starter 
Apple claims Mac OS X Leopard includes "over 300 new features," but how many of them are significant reasons to upgrade? And how many of those 300 new features were revealed for the first time today? Here's a comprehensive list for those readers who don't have time to scour Apple's various Leopard pages on their own.

New Apps, New Features

Some represent substantial new applications, including the redone Finder, Spaces, and Time Machine. Others are thoughtfully subtle refinements to the applications you already use. Apple's list doesn't even capture the whole range of what's new, but here's some notable must have elements from its listing.

Address Book

For example, you can now sync your Address Book with Yahoo in addition to Apple's .Mac service, Microsoft Exchange Server, and other LDAP directories.

Boot Camp

If you boot your Intel Mac into Windows, Apple now provides updated drivers that are Microsoft certified, so Windows doesn't throw up warnings when you try to install them. The keyboard drivers also better map keys to Windows functions.

Enhancements to the file system mean you can wipe out your Windows partition and restore the disk back to Mac OS X using live repartitioning.

Dashboard & Dashcode

Apple includes a new Movies and Theaters widget which displays trailers and lets you buy online tickets. Your selection of widgets can now be synced between computers with .Mac.

Apple provides Dashcode as a development tool for building your own widgets, providing simple templates so you can get started even if you're not a programmer. Dashcode is like HyperCard for the web, but uses standard JavaScript, HTML and CSS for building mini-functional web bits.

If that sounds too complicated, you can use the new Web Clip feature built into Safari to simply cut out a selection of a web page as a live clipping that updates in Dashboard.

Developer Tools

New code presentation features in Xcode, with instant-on debugging, faster searching, project snapshots, and a research assistant for pulling up API documentation and source code references. New support for Sun's DTrace code optimization and performance monitoring, support for Ruby and Python in building Cocoa applications and AppleEvent scripting.

The Dock, Desktop and Finder

A new feature of the 3D Dock is "Spring Loaded" icons. Drag a file to a Stack or an application, hit the spacebar, and that folder or application opens up, allowing you to drag your icon directly into the context you want.

This can be used to a drag and drop file into a specific folder in the Finder without having to move windows around. Just drag it to the Finder icon in the Dock or a Stack, hit space, and Finder window pops up allowing you to dig down through folders in the Finder in one smooth action.

You can now set up file sharing on any folder, using contacts from your Address Book to specify access permissions. With "Back to My Mac" you can even access your home shared files from remote locations using .Mac to track and relay your home location automatically, even if you have DSL or Cable Internet access that hides your location behind a firewall.

The Finder itself is made over with Cover Flow, dynamic file Icon Previews, and an option Path Bar that shows a breadcrumb trail of the location of the folder you're in.

Font Book

When an application requests a fond that is disabled, the new Font Book can auto-activate it, and then disable it again after that application quits. Leopard also protects required system fonts so you don't accidently wipe them out. It also prints hardcopy font catalogs for you, and even supports Braille fonts.

Front Row

Leopard delivers all of the features of Apple TV (apart from a dedicated YouTube client), so you can use your laptop to stream content to your TV from another system's iTunes library, using the same "10 foot interface" you can control via remote control.

iCal

Calendaring gets a huge makeover, with CalDAV integration, support for advanced calendaring features such as delegation, free-busy status, office hours, auto-pick appointment scheduling, and resource reservations.

iChat

Builds upon video conferencing and chat features with screen sharing, document sharing in iChat Theater, AppleScript automated tasks, backdrop effects in video chats, tabbed windows, and animated icons you can build in Photo Booth.

International Support

More fonts, more keyboard layouts and input methods, more foreign language localizations and expanded support for system wide spell checking.

Mail

Notes sync with .Mac. Email archives are easier to create, allowing you to transfer your mail to another system. Mail gets a photo Media Browser for plugging your own pictures into Stationery templates. To Do events sync with iCal.

The new Mail provides smart support for more ISPs, so you don't need to know your email server settings. It also works as an RSS feedreader, and tracks articles you've read even if you separately read them from Safari.

Network Utility

Leopard adjusts your TCP buffer size automatically for "optimum application performance in high-bandwidth/high-latency environments." It also provides new tools for AirPort wireless networks.

Photo Booth

Takes four shot pictures like a real coin-op photo booth. Create new photo effects, and record videos. Export movies or Photo Booth slides into animated GIF icons for use in iChat.

Preview

Better searching, customized layout, editing tools for graphics and PDFs, support for GPS positioning metadata. Batch imaging operations.

Printing

Live previews of print jobs in print dialogs. Location manager smart selects the default printer when you travel. Software Update offers to install new drivers for your printer as the manufacturer updates them.

Safari

Movable Tabs let you reorder pages and drop all open windows into a single tabbed one, or drag a tab out into its own window. Safari warns you before closing a window with multiple tabs. Create a bookmark that includes multiple tabbed windows. Visual Find command highlights occurrences on the page. Purge history items automatically.

Security Features

Tags downloads to advise you when applications change, so malicious websites can't dump malware without you're knowing it. Signed apps, sandboxed environments, random system library addressing, expanded support for digital certificates and smart card.

Spaces

Virtual desktops let you set up virtual desktop regions to isolate tasks. Move windows between them by dragging them to the edge of the screen and bump them into a new space.

Spotlight

Solve equations, find definitions in the dictionary, launch apps instantly with just a few keys, do more complex queries, select search by file name or content.

System Wide Features

Media Browser integrated into open file dialogs, so you can browse your photos, movies, and music and open them in any application. Scroll through the content of open windows in the background.

Leopard mounts filesystem using separate threads, so unresponsive volumes don't slow down the system. Optimizations for dual core processors.

Improved help guides highlight menu functions in applications. System wide spell check is now combined with grammar checking. Vastly improved text to speech. Keyboard based drag and drop.

Braille support for the blind and for creating Braille documents. Hardware support for Braille input and finger-read displays. Improved Voice Over features with spell checking, positional audio effects.

Text Edit

Autosave in Text Edit, support for Office 2007 and OpenDocument files compatible with Open Office.

Time Machine

Intuitive backup and restore, with automatic scheduling, exclusion lists, and disaster recovery options that plug you backups into the reinstallation process.

The 300 features don't touch on new graphical embellishments and eye candy, nor many of the significant yet invisiable new features of Leopard that will induce developers to build faster, smarter, prettier applications; it's 300 marketable features. That leaves Leopard a no-brainer upgrade. Leopard goes on sale in ten days.
post #2 of 76
Great article.

There is a typo in the 'Font' category description: "When an application requests a fond that..."
post #3 of 76
$129 is really a great deal. When you compare it to Windows, it's simply a must.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #4 of 76
Pouting.... I don't wanna wait 10 days. I could die by then and never get to use it!
post #5 of 76
I will get it when I buy a new computer, but I really do not see anything that I really need. I like the design changes. That will be fun. However, most of the features are really just eye candy.
post #6 of 76
I just pray searching over networks is improved. (non-Macintosh networks that is). Spotlight is garbage when searching a windows or linux fileserver.
post #7 of 76
does XP and/or Vista do this?

hahahaha.


i know, i know, "does your mac play games?"

and my answer is: "not at all, because i have a ps3 and no interest in gaming past that."


=]
post #8 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by TerrinB View Post

However, most of the features are really just eye candy.

You're kidding me. Did you even read the list of changes in this article (let alone the 300 list on Apple's website)?? Improvements in Spotlight, Spaces, and Time Machine are "eye-candy"?

You are absolutely insane, or, you just don't know what the word eye-candy means.\
post #9 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

$129 is really a great deal. When you compare it to Windows, it's simply a must.


$109 and free shipping through Amazon if you pre-order!:

http://www.amazon.com/Apple-Mac-Vers...2562120&sr=8-1




...
Cut-copy-paste, MMS, landscape keyboard, video-recording, voice-calling, and more... FINALLY
To the 'We Didn't Need It' Crowd/Apple Apologista Squad : Wrong again, lol
Thanks for listening to your...
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Cut-copy-paste, MMS, landscape keyboard, video-recording, voice-calling, and more... FINALLY
To the 'We Didn't Need It' Crowd/Apple Apologista Squad : Wrong again, lol
Thanks for listening to your...
Reply
post #10 of 76
Features like this:

"Leopard mounts filesystem using separate threads, so unresponsive volumes don't slow down the system. Optimizations for dual core processors."

are great but I'm still wondering why it's taken this long to put them in. You'd have thought some genius would have figured these things out a while ago. We've been suffering from unresponsive volumes for years.

I even think that every web page in Safari should have it's own thread so that if one stupid site decides that its flash adverts are going to hang up the browser that it shouldn't affect any of the other sites I have open. I should just right-click the tab and force quit the page that's causing an issue and Safari stays open.

Also, when are we going to get downloads in a tab/sidebar? I can't believe that's still not in there.

Some of the features are a bit far fetched though. Tabs and the fact they can be moved count as 2 separate features for the terminal?

"Copy Files Between Mac OS X and Windows
Copy, open, modify, or delete files in Mac OS X that you saved to your Windows partition. Leopard understands the Windows FAT32 disk format."

Did they mean to write NTFS there? I'm sure someone said one of the newer Leopard builds had write support for NTFS.

Overall, it looks like a good package but still some disappointments like it looks as though we're still getting that uglified interface with the weird mix of candy blobs and nice subtle shading.
post #11 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by dontlookleft View Post

does XP and/or Vista do this?

hahahaha.


i know, i know, "does your mac play games?"

and my answer is: "not at all, because i have a ps3 and no interest in gaming past that."


=]

i totally agree with you!!!
why can't people get past the fact that
Personal Computers are meant for
'personal' use!!
thats why they invented computers that play games
separately like the PS3, Wii, XBOX, etc...
i get so angry and heated-up whenever people
say 'Macs suck because there arent any games for it'!
it's stupid and makes no sense whats so ever!
people need to grow up and buy themselves a game console if
they really want to play games!!!!
post #12 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

Features like this:

"Leopard mounts filesystem using separate threads, so unresponsive volumes don't slow down the system. Optimizations for dual core processors."

are great but I'm still wondering why it's taken this long to put them in. You'd have thought some genius would have figured these things out a while ago. We've been suffering from unresponsive volumes for years.

I even think that every web page in Safari should have it's own thread so that if one stupid site decides that its flash adverts are going to hang up the browser that it shouldn't affect any of the other sites I have open. I should just right-click the tab and force quit the page that's causing an issue and Safari stays open.

Also, when are we going to get downloads in a tab/sidebar? I can't believe that's still not in there.

Some of the features are a bit far fetched though. Tabs and the fact they can be moved count as 2 separate features for the terminal?

"Copy Files Between Mac OS X and Windows
Copy, open, modify, or delete files in Mac OS X that you saved to your Windows partition. Leopard understands the Windows FAT32 disk format."

Did they mean to write NTFS there? I'm sure someone said one of the newer Leopard builds had write support for NTFS.

Overall, it looks like a good package but still some disappointments like it looks as though we're still getting that uglified interface with the weird mix of candy blobs and nice subtle shading.

OS X has always been able to read FATXX volumes. All external drives/USB flash drives run on the FAT16/32 filesystem, so it's only natural. Even if they meant to write NTFS, they aren't wrong.
post #13 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielandrews View Post

I just pray searching over networks is improved. (non-Macintosh networks that is). Spotlight is garbage when searching a windows or linux fileserver.

We've got X-serves at my work, and Spotlight is garbage on that too. For all intents and purposes, it doesn't work at all. Whenever we need to find something on the netwrok, we go over to an OS 9 machine and use Sherlock.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TerrinB View Post

However, most of the features are really just eye candy.

I totally agree. There really is not much there at all. Whenever I see people raving about these "300 new features", I always wonder what they've been smoking. Tiger was a miniscule improvement (especially compared to the hype), and I see nothing that indicates that Leopard is any different.
post #14 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by TerrinB View Post

most of the features are really just eye candy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

I totally agree. There really is not much there at all.

Eh... to each his/her own. I think it's unfair to characterize the majority of the features as "eye candy," since the vast, vast majority of them are actual features and improvements, not design changes. Out of the 300 listed, I can't think of more than a handful that are just "eye candy."

However, I can see how you might say a lot of the new features aren't important or useful to you, depending on how you use your Mac. There's nothing in here that represents a major, game-changing feature. The biggest features are things like Spaces and Time Machine, and some people may not find those particularly useful.

To me, though, this is a major upgrade. A lot of the new features are things I've been wanting for a long time. Some of them, like Time Machine, strike me as brilliant improvements over what's already out there. Others, like iChat invisibility mode, strike me as long overdue. Either way, they're things I want that will make my life a whole lot easier. I'm sold on it.
post #15 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBaggins View Post

$109 and free shipping through Amazon if you pre-order!:

http://www.amazon.com/Apple-Mac-Vers...2562120&sr=8-1

...

when we can expect the delivery? i ordered one also with super saver shipping ... within a week?

Nov '09 | iMac 21.5" C2D 3.06 Ghz | Intel 330 240GB SSD | ATI

Sep '12| Toshiba 14" 1366 x 768! | i5 3rd Gen 6GB| Intel x25-m 120GB SSD | Win 7|  Viewsonic VX2255wmb 22" LCD
iPhone 4S| iPad 2 wifi

Reply

Nov '09 | iMac 21.5" C2D 3.06 Ghz | Intel 330 240GB SSD | ATI

Sep '12| Toshiba 14" 1366 x 768! | i5 3rd Gen 6GB| Intel x25-m 120GB SSD | Win 7|  Viewsonic VX2255wmb 22" LCD
iPhone 4S| iPad 2 wifi

Reply
post #16 of 76
"Media Browser integrated into open file dialogs, so you can browse your photos, movies, and music and open them in any application."

This is the one feature that I've been waiting for for the longest time. Without a media browser in the open dialog box, new Mac users are confused as hell when they're trying to upload a photo to their webmail and they don't know how to browse their photos from the open dialog box. It's because they CAN'T! Not sure why it took Apple this long to add this very necessary feature. Windows has actually had this feature for years.
post #17 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBaggins View Post

$109 and free shipping through Amazon if you pre-order!:

http://www.amazon.com/Apple-Mac-Vers...2562120&sr=8-1




...

Location: Ireland
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #18 of 76
To clarify this feature:

Copy Files Between Mac OS X and Windows
Copy, open, modify, or delete files in Mac OS X that you saved to your Windows partition. Leopard understands the Windows FAT32 disk format.


I think the only purpose for this statement is that they want to make it obvious that you can easily make a document in windows, boot into OS X and open that document.

They are not talking about NTFS because for the OS X user, they cannot write to NTFS.


(I am familiar with how you can; save your stamp)
post #19 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanmugam View Post

when we can expect the delivery? i ordered one also with super saver shipping ... within a week?

PLEASE NOTE: This product will ship October 26.
post #20 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by DCJ001 View Post

PLEASE NOTE: This product will ship October 26.

December 12? Are you sure?
post #21 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by DCJ001 View Post

PLEASE NOTE: This product will ship October 26.

I'll wait until at least 10.5.1 to see what Leopard breaks and after the first bug fix.

Also, I wonder if Leopard's version of Safari is any better than the buggy v3.0.3 I now have.
post #22 of 76
They don't mention Resoultion Independence?
post #23 of 76
Is Safari 3 going to be leopard-only, or will (the final, non-beta version) run on Tiger?
post #24 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

We've got X-serves at my work, and Spotlight is garbage on that too. For all intents and purposes, it doesn't work at all. Whenever we need to find something on the netwrok, we go over to an OS 9 machine and use Sherlock.

Spotlight on Tiger doesn't search across the network, which is probably why it's "garbage" on your xserves.

you can still do regular finder searches on 10.4 that will match things like filename; these are returned speedily. (local network, about 5 mounted shares, 100,000+ files.) I've certainly never wanted to go to an OS 9 machine.

I doubt searching linux or windows file shares will be radically improved, as they of course don't support Spotlight.
post #25 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by DCJ001 View Post

PLEASE NOTE: This product will ship October 26.

i too noticed that now, it may be loooong weekend wait to get leopard, i have less than 9GB, good time to spend clean up and get macbook leopard ready.

if I do clean install, my vista will be erased rite?

Nov '09 | iMac 21.5" C2D 3.06 Ghz | Intel 330 240GB SSD | ATI

Sep '12| Toshiba 14" 1366 x 768! | i5 3rd Gen 6GB| Intel x25-m 120GB SSD | Win 7|  Viewsonic VX2255wmb 22" LCD
iPhone 4S| iPad 2 wifi

Reply

Nov '09 | iMac 21.5" C2D 3.06 Ghz | Intel 330 240GB SSD | ATI

Sep '12| Toshiba 14" 1366 x 768! | i5 3rd Gen 6GB| Intel x25-m 120GB SSD | Win 7|  Viewsonic VX2255wmb 22" LCD
iPhone 4S| iPad 2 wifi

Reply
post #26 of 76
yes, what about resolution independence?

and most of all, what about Quicktime? it needs a big refresher, first, to handle all the common types of video and other media files it can't now without shareware help, and, two to seamlessly incorporate the AVCBrowser now buried in the Firewire SDK. and there are other details ... it's badly out of date.
post #27 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtx View Post

Is Safari 3 going to be leopard-only, or will (the final, non-beta version) run on Tiger?

What would be the point of having beta's in 10.4, and not allowing the final to run?

That would anger quite a few people.
post #28 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

yes, what about resolution independence?

and most of all, what about Quicktime? it needs a big refresher, first, to handle all the common types of video and other media files it can't now without shareware help, and, two to seamlessly incorporate the AVCBrowser now buried in the Firewire SDK. and there are other details ... it's badly out of date.

It's frustrating, as that was one feature I wanted the most.

So do many others here.
post #29 of 76
Quote:
Enhanced VPN Client Compatibility
Connect to a broader range of VPN clients. Leopard supports Cisco Group Filtering as well as DHCP over PPP, which allows you to dynamically acquire additional configuration options such as static routes and search domains.

Does this mean a subsequent update to the iPhone/Touch will allow them to work on those Cisco networks as well? This is huge for me and a lot of college students who are forced to use Cisco VPN to connect to the net via their campus' wireless network.
post #30 of 76
Resolution independence is there...whether there are system controls for it is another thing entirely.

http://developer.apple.com/leopard/overview/

Resolution Independence
The old assumption that displays are 72dpi has been rendered obsolete by advances in display technology. Macs now ship with displays that sport native resolutions of 100dpi or better. Furthermore, the number of pixels per inch will continue to increase dramatically over the next few years. This will make displays crisper and smoother, but it also means that interfaces that are pixel-based will shrink to the point of being unusable. The solution is to remove the 72dpi assumption that has been the norm. In Leopard, the system, including the Carbon and Cocoa frameworks, will be able to draw user interface elements using a scale factor. This will let the user interface maintain the same physical size while gaining resolution and crispness from high dpi displays.

The introduction of resolution independence may mean that there is work that youll need to do in order to make your application look as good as possible. For modern Cocoa and Carbon applications, most of the work will center around raster-based resources. For older applications that use QuickDraw, more work will be required to replace QuickDraw-based calls with Quartz ones.


Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

It's frustrating, as that was one feature I wanted the most.

So do many others here.
post #31 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by s.metcalf View Post

Resolution independence is there...whether there are system controls for it is another thing entirely.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

yes, what about resolution independence?

Resolution independence was one of the features that fell off the Web pages post WWDC 2007. If you looked at the Leopard Web pages before WWDC 2007 and after you'll see several things advertised in 2006 that were silently dropped. Others that are gone are anti-phishing and Carbon 64-bit (which is more of a political decision apparently, but still missing).

Resolution independence will be supported in the same capacity as it is in Tiger: changeable via the Developer Tools only and not officially supported. At WWDC 2007 they announced that resolution independence is still buggy in Leopard and only a "handful" of built-in applications in Leopard will support it. Absent from the list was Safari. They are encouraging 3rd party developers to test their own applications with it so they can enable it in 10.x (not 10.5.x necessarily).

Finally worth noting: no applications in the last couple builds of Leopard were 64-bit except for Chess.app and Xcode.app. The system frameworks are 64-bit as advertised, but Apple never promised (and is not delivering) their own applications as 64-bit. It makes sense because 64 bit provides little but I've seen 64-bit tossed around on the Internet as some sort of panacea.

And since Leopard is now officially GM I don't feel bad in the least about spilling any of that. Woo hoo first post!
post #32 of 76
thanks, s.metcalf, for that informative link. further down the same page:

QuickTime Improvements
Working with video using QuickTime has long been a strength of Mac OS X. Now, its as easy to build video capture into your application as it is to work with pre-recorded video. By using the QTKit Capture API, you can capture video from an iSight, USB (VDC) and FireWire (IIDC) devices, and DV cameras. The API even lets you output to multiple outputs.

QuickTimes plumbing is receiving significant upgrades in Leopard. There have been significant enhancements in handling the H.264 encoding. Also, transparent alpha layers, an optional part of the H.264 specification, are now supported in H.264-based QuickTime movies. And finally, QuickTime supports 64-bit. However, the functionality for 64-bit QuickTime is only provided via the QTKit framework. The current C-based QuickTime API will only be supported in 32-bit mode.

so ... will they now include firewire video capture into QuickTime Pro? be nice ... well, wait and see.
post #33 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by rawhead View Post

You're kidding me. Did you even read the list of changes in this article (let alone the 300 list on Apple's website)?? Improvements in Spotlight, Spaces, and Time Machine are "eye-candy"?

You are absolutely insane, or, you just don't know what the word eye-candy means.\

I think you don't understand the word "most".

Like most Forum dwellers you read what you want to read and not what is written.

I agree that, unfortunately, most of Leopard's "new features' are just eye candy some of it quite regressive such as the icons sitting on top of the dock in 3D. The reason logos are largely graphical not photographic and rarely 3D is that they are much easier to read when simplified. Not just that but it makes relocating the Dock to the sides look positively ridiculous.

I can not say with certainty that the many bugs or GUI flaws I have picked up in OSX since it came out are still there, but I won't be surprised when they are. Apple has shown little interest in polishing OSX when it can stick another coat of paint on instead and sell it as "New".

Lets face it, Apple and Steve's attention have been elsewhere for the last few years and upgrades to OSX seem to have been on the backburner.
post #34 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

thanks, s.metcalf, for that informative link. further down the same page:

QuickTime Improvements
Working with video using QuickTime has long been a strength of Mac OS X. Now, its as easy to build video capture into your application as it is to work with pre-recorded video. By using the QTKit Capture API, you can capture video from an iSight, USB (VDC) and FireWire (IIDC) devices, and DV cameras. The API even lets you output to multiple outputs.

QuickTimes plumbing is receiving significant upgrades in Leopard. There have been significant enhancements in handling the H.264 encoding. Also, transparent alpha layers, an optional part of the H.264 specification, are now supported in H.264-based QuickTime movies. And finally, QuickTime supports 64-bit. However, the functionality for 64-bit QuickTime is only provided via the QTKit framework. The current C-based QuickTime API will only be supported in 32-bit mode.

so ... will they now include firewire video capture into QuickTime Pro? be nice ... well, wait and see.

Any chance that Apple has improved the QuickTime Pro interface?

It desperately needs a rewrite to work like all the other graphic apps and allow straightforward editing and adding of material by simple selection, cropping, insertion and dragging.
post #35 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by gastroboy View Post

I think you don't understand the word "most".

Like most Forum dwellers you read what you want to read and not what is written.

I agree that, unfortunately, most of Leopard's "new features' are just eye candy .

well, what the heck do you mean by "most" the two times you just used the word? one reason people often mis-read is because the statement is unclear to start with.

sure, a good number of Leopards new features on the 300+ list can be called "eye candy."

and even more can be called "bells and whistles" added to current programs, like all that fancy iChat stuff, that most people will never actually use. although there are some neat new tricks on that list, and we'll all find a couple we do like (WebClip i can see myself using a lot). you could call them "new," just not "important" or "significant."

but then many on the list are clearly significant functional improvements/enhancements that many will find very useful, like Spaces and the improved Spotlight, Safari 3 graduating from Beta, QuickLook, Network Preferences, Guest Log-In, maybe Stacks, etc, and some meaningful details in various programs.

as to both "really new" and "big," there aren't many in number from the non-tech user standpoint, it is true. Time Machine. Certainly Boot Camp graduating from Beta. i think that is what is disappointing to some.

(As to all the tech programs like Automator, XCode, Terminal, Security, Dashcode, etc, others who are qualified need to let us know about their significance, i've no idea.)

but when you add it all up, and throw in iWork 08 and iLife 08 which, though separate strictly speaking, really are part of the total Mac new 2007 software package - then you have a heck of a package! plus a few new useful pieces of hardware like Airport Extreme and those phone/pod things that extend the OS's reach into broader realms.

so, still not good enough to earn even some praise? ok, go ahead, put your entire system back to what is was on December 31, 2006, and say bah humbug. but "most" Mac users will not be opting for that.
post #36 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by age_leopard View Post

i totally agree with you!!!
why can't people get past the fact that
Personal Computers are meant for
'personal' use!!

Whose special case always was, and it is more today with the increasing power of the computers, entertainment and in particular gaming.

Quote:
Originally Posted by age_leopard View Post

thats why they invented computers that play games
separately like the PS3, Wii, XBOX, etc...

The one does not exclude the other. Some people like to casually play a light game while awaiting a processing job to finish, while others prefer to devote time exclusively to games, either on computer or console.

Quote:
Originally Posted by age_leopard View Post

i get so angry and heated-up whenever people
say 'Macs suck because there arent any games for it'!
it's stupid and makes no sense whats so ever!
people need to grow up and buy themselves a game console if
they really want to play games!!!!

Chill down or you risk to bust this little vein in your head. Computers, game consoles etc. are just that. There are much more important values in this life and there is certainly no need to get angry.
post #37 of 76
The DVD player is substantially improved.

- ffwding now stops immediately (on Tiger there is a several second delay)
- there are more controls in full screen mode
- if there is a scratched area on the disk it will happily skip it and display a message that it is doing so. In Tiger it would just die.
- No more skipping when minimizing to the Dock
- New scrub control on main window (like Quicktime has), but hidden until you mouseover

Definitely more than just a point release.
post #38 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

Tiger was a miniscule improvement (especially compared to the hype), and I see nothing that indicates that Leopard is any different.

I agree with the sentiment that Tiger was an unexciting update, and a very, very buggy one at that.

Leopard is a different beast. Sure, not 300 innovations. But there are a lot of medium level enhancements which make this a very solid upgrade. And there are quite a few big enhancement in there too. I bet once people use Leopard for a few weeks they will look at Tiger as if it were release 20 years ago.

Of course, the big mystery with Leopard is quality. Apple, of late, has had horrific quality in basically everything they have released. (I'm sitting here trying to think of an exception, but can't. Not good.)

Anyway, will Leopard have the quality of the "New Apple" or of the "Old Apple?"

Given this OS will be on 1/2 the computers in my office by the end of the launch weekend, I hope Apple doesn't screw this up like the new OS in the iPods, the iMac video driver train wreck, Safari for Windows, iPod touch screens, MacBook heat, MacBook Pro yellow displays, unfixed sparkle issues in the cinema displays, etc., etc.,

(See what I mean. Every product of late is train wreck quality.)

But to be positive, I am really looking forward to Leopard. I just hope Apple didn't cut corners.
post #39 of 76
No info about Java 1.6 makes me stuck with Windows. Sadly Leopard looks great, but sum cross-platform compatibility would be great. At least saying "we won't support Java" would help too, as it could initiate others to develop Apple independent JVM. However Apple doesn't communicate with developers well. It's pitty that the best OS is developed by one of the most arrogant company.
post #40 of 76
I looked in my Tiger AddressBook and it has options for synchronizing with Exchange (Outlook Web Access), Yahoo! and LDAP servers. So, not a new feature.
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