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Mossberg: Apple's Leopard evolutionary, not revolutionary - Page 3

post #81 of 86
I could not disagree more with WSJ. While Leopard may not be revolutionary, it is a revolution over anything that MS puts out. To upgrade I answered 3 questions and walked away. An hour later it was all ready for me to use. Let me ask you which MS upgrade goes as smoothly as this one. Not a single I mean not a single hitch. Apple is not targeting the corporate users though they would be smart to adopt it.

Mossberg is silly in his statement that there were flaws - the flaws he mentions; would be godsend if they were the only flaws in MS Windows Vista. That thing is buggy as hell.

As of today I have shut down my Windows junk machines and converted them into Linux machines to play with.

Arvi
post #82 of 86
Yes, for a Windows user, it is a revolution... you're right from that perspective. Welcome to the Mac experience!

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #83 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by rvamerongen View Post

And true, this is not revolutionary, this should be 10.4.10, not 10.5.
The only thing that I am happy with is that the server version is changed a lot. They may call that 10.4.11

Actually, this is a point release so real revolution will only come with 11 the earliest. Hope they won't sell every point release as a separate OS and bring 11 within this decade.

If they want revolution, show us the long rumored resolution free OS.
post #84 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by emulator View Post

If they want revolution, show us the long rumored resolution free OS.

There certainly would be a revolution if Apple released RI before it was ready. Lawyers and deep-pocket diggers with torches outside Cupertino would be the ones revolting if it was released before it was perfected.

Its not as easy as you think to create RI. There are many articles on the subject, just Google it. Also, it will probably not be available for all displays. I suspect that when Apple finally releases it, OS X will auto-detect if the monitor size and resolution will benefit from RI then, and only then, will it be enabled.

There are enough new Leopard frameworks that outshine Tiger that make the upgrade worthwhile. A new line of Apple Cinema Dispays with IR sensors and iSight cameras are long overdue, and with the iMac now hitting 24" Apple may be waiting to get RI perfected before releasing this new HW to its consumers.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #85 of 86
There's really only one Apple LCD that RI comes into play IMO and that's the 30" with the highest resolution.

Give me a 24" ACD with 2560x1600 resolution and RI takes on a whole new level of usefulness.
He's a mod so he has a few extra vBulletin privileges. That doesn't mean he should stop posting or should start acting like Digital Jesus.
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He's a mod so he has a few extra vBulletin privileges. That doesn't mean he should stop posting or should start acting like Digital Jesus.
- SolipsismX
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post #86 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by palegolas View Post

I don't think it's just a matter of personal taste. I think more importantly it's a matter of functionality. The new icons in the home folder are horrible when it comes to recognition.

I think you're right in terms of principle, but I think your concerns aren't as great in application. I mean, how often do you browse the icons in your home folder? The sidebar takes care of that, and its icons are sufficiently functional.
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