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Blu-ray vs. HD DVD (2008) - Page 11

post #401 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by bitemymac View Post

Because I can?...

You're right about wasting my time here, though.

Bye then
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I don't see how an anti M$ stance can be seen as a bad thing on an Apple forum I really can't!

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post #402 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by marzetta7 View Post

Blu-ray Olive Branch...?

http://www.digitalbits.com/#mytwocents


Musta missed that earlier, interesting, and there is a few ways that might work out.

Warner has been a pretty deadening bomb dropped hard, but another one even if "only" from Apple might be a final straw.

The Toshiba sound bite of "we have been called dead before" MY thoughts on it were "yeah, but you only get resuscitated so many times"

From another blog I read and the owner was trying to wring the LAST possible bit of optimism out of HD-DVD even he had to admit "The fat lady isn't singing YET.. but she IS warming up back stage"
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I don't see how an anti M$ stance can be seen as a bad thing on an Apple forum I really can't!

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post #403 of 2640
Oh yeah, Kingdom of Heaven arrived today so I might take a look at that later
I don't see how an anti M$ stance can be seen as a bad thing on an Apple forum I really can't!

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post #404 of 2640
Sony should just make this quick and painless for Toshiba:

For customers who previously bought HD-DVD players and movies wants to convert their purchase to a Blu-Ray, Sony should:
  • Offer free Blu-Ray titles in exchange for the customer's HD-DVD titles. Titles available exclusivly to HD-DVD can be exchanged for any other Blu-Ray title.
  • Offer 50% off Sony Blu-Ray players in exchange for returning their current HD-DVD player to Sony. Sony can take the HD-DVD player and recycle it for parts.
post #405 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by icfireball View Post

Sony should just make this quick and painless for Toshiba:

If customer who previously bought HD-DVD player and HD-DVD movies buys a Blu-Ray system, Sony will send them free Blu-Ray editions of titles available in Blu-Ray, up to 25 discs maximum, in exchange for returning the HD-DVD discs to Sony.

That is absurd. Nuff said. It speaks for itself.
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post #406 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by onlooker View Post

That is absurd. Nuff said. It speaks for itself.

I edited the post for clarity and added something, but it's still pretty much the same in content.

Sony might loose money initially on those few early HD-DVD player adopters who want to convert, but it strengths and speeds adoption of Blu-Ray. Additionally, those "converted" customers will now be plunking money down in the future for new Blu-Ray titles, not unlike the way gaming counsels themselves sell at a loss because the games and royalties make all of the money.
post #407 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by icfireball View Post

Toshiba should just make this quick and painful for Sony:

For customers who previously bought HD-DVD players and movies wants to convert their purchase to a Blu-Ray, Sony should:
  • Offer free Blu-Ray titles in exchange for the customer's HD-DVD titles. Titles available exclusivly to HD-DVD can be exchanged for any other Blu-Ray title.
  • Offer 50% off Sony Blu-Ray players in exchange for returning their current HD-DVD player to Sony. Sony can take the HD-DVD player and recycle it for parts.

Fixed that for you.

Perhaps the studios that sold the HD DVD exclusive movies could initiate some sort of trade-in. They should really reconsider their positions now anyhow. Regardless if the HD DVD camp has any fight left in it or not, perceptions will have changed in the last few days.

Joking aside, why should all these concessions come from the BR side? Does this mean that Toshiba sits back and says "Sorry, my bad!" and washes their hands of all of it?
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post #408 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bancho View Post

Joking aside, why should all these concessions come from the BR side? Does this mean that Toshiba sits back and says "Sorry, my bad!" and washes their hands of all of it?

In many ways, I agree with you. If you're winning, why make concessions? Except that Sony could potentially save money and dodge a few bullets by speeding up the conversion process.
post #409 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by icfireball View Post

In many ways, I agree with you. If you're winning, why make concessions? Except that Sony could potentially save money and dodge a few bullets by speeding up the conversion process.

I don't see this as sonys responsibility to replace all these peoples HD-DVD's. I'm sure they are going to make a generous offer. Maybe a 5 title trade in, but 25? That's crossing the line of sanity.
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post #410 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by icfireball View Post

In many ways, I agree with you. If you're winning, why make concessions? Except that Sony could potentially save money and dodge a few bullets by speeding up the conversion process.

The thing is though, the players those people bought still do what they were sold to do. The movies they purchased still work in that hardware. If HD DVD had won, would you expect Toshiba to pony up for movies and players that the BR supporters bought? I find that unlikely at best. So many people hate Sony so much that they'd be laughing and deriding them mercilessly.

Perhaps Sony (or why not expand that to all companies producing BR players to help ease the pain to Sony haters?) could offer to soften the blow somewhat to those who bought an HD DVD player, but the studios should have a hand in it too. Ending this is every bit as much in their interest as it is in the hardware manufacturers.

As for people worrying about some sort of Orwellian takeover of the media and people's minds by Sony and the "evil" BR camp, remember that online media will be their competition and they'll be compelled to ease up or lose out to downloadable media. In a way, this is great because it's incentive to improve infrastructures to handle "on demand" content.
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post #411 of 2640
Thread Starter 
Bill Gates reveals Microsoft's strategy (CONFIRMATION!)

http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2...tes-unplugged/

Quote:
Warner Brothers said last week it was backing Blu-ray exclusively. Will Microsoft remain committed to the HD DVD format even if it appears that the media companies are backing Blu-ray?

Certainly we supported both Blu-ray and HD DVD as Windows peripherals. The last announcement was Paramount opting for HD DVD and now this one is going the other way. I still think a format battle is going on there. Our contribution is the HDi Interactive format piece has been really well received. We hope to see that used broadly. I think the real competitor in the long run is digital (video) download. Just like in music, it is going to be the biggest of the three.

You kind of sound agnostic about the formats.

No, not really. We have definitely worked with HD DVD in a very strong fashion. Our codecs and HDi are available on the other format and we are a leader in digital download so we have some involvement in all three approaches. In the long run, people dont want physical media. You dont say to yourself, whats the format battle after CD. If someone tried to introduce a new music format, youd laugh and say well isnt that my phone, my iPod and my Zune? And youd be right.

Confirmation to those HD DVD proponents who were telling everyone how crazy they were for thinking Microsoft was in it--HD DVD--simply to confuse the consumer and get them to downloads.

Also, I think Bill is also wrong on the music front. As I would be totally interested in a high-end music format from Blu-ray with 7.1 surround sound, amped up sampling, etc.

As a matter of fact, I'm expecting to see it soon...and then I'll convert these into iTunes if I need to.
post #412 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walter Slocombe View Post

Really?

Then what are you doing in this thread huffing and blowing?

Just keep on squeezing your eyes tight and repeating as you are "I don't believe it, I don't believe it!" I don't think it will do you any good though, Warner have gone Blu-ray. so thats about ?? 75% of the market is Blu-ray now. It doesn't matter if you don't believe it, its a fact.

What are you talking about?

When have I said "I don't believe" Blu-Ray has prevailed with the Warner move?

All I've said is that I have no problems with upscaling DVDs quality-wise, and I'm not buying into BR until the DRM is completely broken. I have no idea what you're ranting about now.
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post #413 of 2640
While I agree that RENTALS are heading into the on-demand digital video download format, I think sales, unlike with music will remain on a physical media for a long time. Computer storage isn't to the point where people can store tons of HD movies on their computer. Very quickly they will run out of space. But more importantly, portable storage, i.e. an iPod, is nowhere NEAR the capacity required for that to work. With hard drive MP3 players, you can stored (virtually) unlimited music. I mean, who has 60,000 songs? But when one dual layer blu-ray disc can store 100 GB of HD video or music, is very thin and portable, and very durable/scratch resistant, it's common sense. For rentals where the movie will only be around for a limited time anyways, digital download/on-demand is perfect.
post #414 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by marzetta7 View Post

Bill Gates reveals Microsoft's strategy (CONFIRMATION!)

http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2...tes-unplugged/

Confirmation to those HD DVD proponents who were telling everyone how crazy they were for thinking Microsoft was in it--HD DVD--simply to confuse the consumer and get them to downloads.

That's only "confirmation" to BluRayers who like to spout FUD. Microsoft, like every other software company, sees the move to downloads as inevitable. They are no different in this regard to Apple. Their support of HD-DVD was meant to thwart Sony's PS3 and not have to pay Windows licensing fees to a rival.

The idea that Microsoft embraced HD-DVD to "confuse" the HDM market is still ridiculous, and only promoted by people with little understanding of business strategies.

Quote:
Originally Posted by marzetta7 View Post

Also, I think Bill is also wrong on the music front. As I would be totally interested in a high-end music format from Blu-ray with 7.1 surround sound, amped up sampling, etc.

Oh help us. Now he wants to use Blu-Ray to bring back DRM music sales, when even SonyBMG has thrown in the towel on that.
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post #415 of 2640
Ok, seriously now, BR and HD DVD are so totally overkill for audio only presentation it's really pretty silly.

Have peope really even bought into music only DVDs?
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post #416 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank777 View Post

That's only "confirmation" to BluRayers who like to spout FUD. Microsoft, like every other software company, sees the move to downloads as inevitable. They are no different in this regard to Apple. Their support of HD-DVD was meant to thwart Sony's PS3 and not have to pay Windows licensing fees to a rival.

The idea that Microsoft embraced HD-DVD to "confuse" the HDM market is still ridiculous, and only promoted by people with little understanding of business strategies.



Oh help us. Now he wants to use Blu-Ray to bring back DRM music sales, when even SonyBMG has thrown in the towel on that.

The majority of Bill Gates speech yesterday was supposed to be about HD-DVD. It's his last ditch effort to go out with hope rather than the truth. He bet the wrong horse and fell flat on his face yesterday. Confirmed!
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post #417 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bancho View Post

Ok, seriously now, BR and HD DVD are so totally overkill for audio only presentation it's really pretty silly.

Have peope really even bought into music only DVDs?

Some of the the concert DVD has audio files as big as 2GB just on stereo LPCM. Also multichannel DTS mix is about 1.5 GB as well on some concert DVD's.

However, it's more to do with bandwidth, because multichannel lossless tracks would require higher bandwidth than the DVD technology can offer. Also, some of the advanced audio codec would not be compatible with all DVD players.

But, most people do not have the system that enjoy such high end audio presentation. I'm sure it will be welcomed in the elite enthusiast market.
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post #418 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by bitemymac View Post

Some of the the concert DVD has audio files as big as 2GB just on stereo LPCM. Also multichannel DTS mix is about 1.5 GB as well on some concert DVD's.

However, it's more to do with bandwidth once multichannel lossless tracks would require higher bandwidth than the DVD technology can offer.

But, most people do not have the system that enjoy such high end audio presentation. I'm sure it will be welcomed in the elite enthusiast market.

Ok, I can buy that.
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post #419 of 2640
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bancho View Post

Ok, seriously now, BR and HD DVD are so totally overkill for audio only presentation it's really pretty silly.

Have peope really even bought into music only DVDs?

Nope because there was a format war there as well. That is what happens when two different audio formats are on the market for too long.
post #420 of 2640
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank777 View Post

Oh help us. Now he wants to use Blu-Ray to bring back DRM music sales, when even SonyBMG has thrown in the towel on that.

You never know, since it is "Sony's" Blu-ray to you, all the music they sell on a BA (Blu-ray Audio) disc may be DRM free.

Moreover, I think you seriously have some sort of pirating issues you need to sort out, as you are the individual giving the biggest stink about DRM, when most people can honestly care less what DRM is on the disc, as long as it plays, and plays beautifully.
post #421 of 2640
Thread Starter 
Paramount/Dreamworks - No New Title Announcements for CES

http://www.highdefdigest.com/news/sh...;UPDATED]/1345

Quote:
UPDATE: We have received word from Paramount/DreamWorks that although they continue to support HD DVD, they will not be making any new high-def title announcements at CES 2008.

Telling perhaps? Uh-oh HD DVD...uh-oh.
post #422 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by marzetta7 View Post

Paramount/Dreamworks - No New Title Announcements for CES

http://www.highdefdigest.com/news/sh...;UPDATED]/1345



Telling perhaps? Uh-oh HD DVD...uh-oh.

They had not announced it in CES 2007, either. It was FOX who announce bunch of title list and then were put on the MIA list. CES is a CE show for hardware. \
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post #423 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by icfireball View Post

While I agree that RENTALS are heading into the on-demand digital video download format, I think sales, unlike with music will remain on a physical media for a long time. Computer storage isn't to the point where people can store tons of HD movies on their computer. Very quickly they will run out of space. But more importantly, portable storage, i.e. an iPod, is nowhere NEAR the capacity required for that to work. With hard drive MP3 players, you can stored (virtually) unlimited music. I mean, who has 60,000 songs? But when one dual layer blu-ray disc can store 100 GB of HD video or music, is very thin and portable, and very durable/scratch resistant, it's common sense. For rentals where the movie will only be around for a limited time anyways, digital download/on-demand is perfect.

Yep. That and the only way you can lose your entire movie collection with physical media is a housefire, act of god or theft; not very common. But with digital downloads, a hard drive failure means you lose your entire collection instantly. I'd bet nearly everyone has been the victim of a hard drive failure or seven in their lifetime. I think we need massive solid-state storage before we can seriously think about putting thousands of dollars of movies in a box the size of your hand.
post #424 of 2640
paramount is next out the door hahaha!
post #425 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post

Yep. That and the only way you can lose your entire movie collection with physical media is a housefire, act of god or theft; not very common. But with digital downloads, a hard drive failure means you lose your entire collection instantly. I'd bet nearly everyone has been the victim of a hard drive failure or seven in their lifetime. I think we need massive solid-state storage before we can seriously think about putting thousands of dollars of movies in a box the size of your hand.

It all depends. If the companies providing digital downloads allowed for, 5 downloads of your file (or unlimited downloads) you don't have to worry about "losing" your song/video/game etc.

Plus, I trust my server to stand up better to my (future) kids than some optical disk. Plus which is easier:

- scroll through a graphical list of movies
- click play

or:

- Navigate through the rack of DVDs
- put it in the player (hoping it isn't dusty, scratched, etc)
- wait for the FBI/CIA/DEA/DRM warning (and thankfully in multiple languages)
- wait through the forced "enhanced" movie ads
- hit play

Personal VoD is the future! It is hear now, in very rudimentary form (AppleTV plus external USB hard drive, server, etc). Optical disks are a dieing breed, and in 5 years we will be either legally/illegally (depending on your view) "ripping" our HDMs or downloading HD content from someone. Hell, I'm so sick of the studios at this point (with the whole writers strike, plus the crap that has been churned out as of late) i'm more interested in seeing what some independents can do and distribute via the internet.
post #426 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by kupan787 View Post

It all depends. If the companies providing digital downloads allowed for, 5 downloads of your file (or unlimited downloads) you don't have to worry about "losing" your song/video/game etc.

Plus, I trust my server to stand up better to my (future) kids than some optical disk. Plus which is easier:

- scroll through a graphical list of movies
- click play

or:

- Navigate through the rack of DVDs
- put it in the player (hoping it isn't dusty, scratched, etc)
- wait for the FBI/CIA/DEA/DRM warning (and thankfully in multiple languages)
- wait through the forced "enhanced" movie ads
- hit play

Personal VoD is the future! It is hear now, in very rudimentary form (AppleTV plus external USB hard drive, server, etc). Optical disks are a dieing breed, and in 5 years we will be either legally/illegally (depending on your view) "ripping" our HDMs or downloading HD content from someone. Hell, I'm so sick of the studios at this point (with the whole writers strike, plus the crap that has been churned out as of late) i'm more interested in seeing what some independents can do and distribute via the internet.

I don't doubt for a second that internet-based media is the wave of the future, I'm just saying there's some major obstacles that have to be resolved before a media server of sorts becomes more than nerdwank. The bandwidth isn't there, massive reliable storage isn't there, and even if it were few people trust having thousands of dollars of media tied to a single corporation's device (or family of devices). The ability to redownload lost media would certainly go a long way, but how about the ability to redownload it from any online media store, be it the Microsoft Zune Store or the iTunes Music Store? That way, your purchases and playback possibilities aren't tied to a single device through via a single file with a proprietary DRM. I think digital media purchasing needs to reach a point where, when you buy a movie, you're buying a license to download that movie in any format from any cooperating online store. Otherwise, it's going to remain a niche market in favor of play-in-all-my-things physical media.

Anyone who thinks we can't go without at least one more generation of physical discs for games and movies after standard-definition DVD is crazy.
post #427 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by shady104 View Post

paramount is next out the door hahaha!

Daring Fireball linked to a Financial Times article that Paramount has decided to switch to Blu-Ray:

FT: Paramount in HD DVD blow

The format war may be coming to an end. As I don't have a horse in the race, it doesn't feel like a victory. I just hope we will have a method to put the video onto the computer...

EDIT: Poor phrasing.
post #428 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by kupan787 View Post

It all depends. If the companies providing digital downloads allowed for, 5 downloads of your file (or unlimited downloads) you don't have to worry about "losing" your song/video/game etc.

Plus, I trust my server to stand up better to my (future) kids than some optical disk. Plus which is easier:

- scroll through a graphical list of movies
- click play

or:

- Navigate through the rack of DVDs
- put it in the player (hoping it isn't dusty, scratched, etc)
- wait for the FBI/CIA/DEA/DRM warning (and thankfully in multiple languages)
- wait through the forced "enhanced" movie ads
- hit play

Personal VoD is the future! It is hear now, in very rudimentary form (AppleTV plus external USB hard drive, server, etc). Optical disks are a dieing breed, and in 5 years we will be either legally/illegally (depending on your view) "ripping" our HDMs or downloading HD content from someone. Hell, I'm so sick of the studios at this point (with the whole writers strike, plus the crap that has been churned out as of late) i'm more interested in seeing what some independents can do and distribute via the internet.

  • You can bet your bottom dollar that digital copies will have FBI warnings as well.
  • Current cost of storage is prohibative of any mass collection of movies on hard disk right now and probably for the next few years at least.
  • Hard drives will always be liable for failure. You'll have to back up, and that requires 2x storage.
  • Blu-Ray discs are said to be EXTREMLY scratch resistant.
  • Dust only matters if it's on the players sensor. Newer DVD players could be easily and cheaply equipt with sensor cleaners.
  • Physical media allows for maximum portability and is more universal. Bring it on the road with you. Pop it in someone else's DVD player or computer.
  • DVD data cannot be corrupted like digital media files on hard drive can.
  • Standard media allows for special features.
  • HD-DVD and Blu-Ray offer great HD quality at 1080p, not just 720p as would probably be the best case senario with on-demand.
  • Internet speeds are not to the point where downloads are more convienient than netflixing, using cable on-demand, or just driving to blockbuster.
  • Studios could create a system where it's very easy to create digital files from a DVD with an added DRM.
  • Unlike with music where you may just buy a single track from an album, you always buy the whole movie. This means there is no significant advantage to digital download over physical media as there is with music.
post #429 of 2640
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bitemymac View Post

They had not announced it in CES 2007, either. It was FOX who announce bunch of title list and then were put on the MIA list. CES is a CE show for hardware. \

Well, maybe this will help you get out of that funky HD DVD haze and realize that the end of this war is here...

http://www.tvpredictions.com/paramount010708.htm

Quote:
Paramount is "poised" to drop its exclusive support of HD DVD and back Blu-ray instead.

That's according to an article by The Financial Times.

Paramount announced last August that it would endorse HD DVD exclusively in the high-def DVD format war. The studio's agreement with the HD DVD group reportedly was set for 18 months.

However, the Financial Times reports that the agreement has a clause that would allow Paramount to drop its support of HD DVD if Warner Bros. backed Blu-ray.

Warner last Friday dropped its neutral stance in the war and announced it was supporting Blu-ray exclusively.

The newspaper cites "people familiar with the situation" in reporting the out clause.


If Paramount endorses Blu-ray, the move would leave HD DVD with only one major studio (Universal) while Blu-ray would have the support of six major studios. It would be difficult for HD DVD to continue with those odds.

Financial Times says it's not clear if DreamWorks, which has also endorsed HD DVD, has the same out clause as Paramount.

I said it before, and I'll go ahead and say it again...

if this is true this definately serves Universal right. They had more than ample time to make a GREAT deal with the BDA for royalties, incentives, etc. but decided to listen to the likes of Graffeo, who obviously steered the HD division right into the crapper. I stated that at last year's CES that Univeral shoud have opted for neutrality since they had the most clout being the only exclusive studio for HD DVD, but if they waited too long the BDA would simply give them the finger and leave them nothing but crumbs...that is exactly what they're going to get if this report comes to fruition.
post #430 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by marzetta7 View Post

Moreover, I think you seriously have some sort of pirating issues you need to sort out, as you are the individual giving the biggest stink about DRM

Come on. That's crap and you know it.

Haven't you ever ripped a CD (or a hundred) in iTunes for you own personal use?

Have you not caught on to the fact that being able to rip video as well would be kind of useful? It's got nothing to do with piracy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by marzetta7 View Post

when most people can honestly care less what DRM is on the disc, as long as it plays, and plays beautifully.

can honestly not care less
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post #431 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post

can honestly not care less

honestly care less, while perhaps grammatically strange, is the phrase that's used in the U.S.
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post #432 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flounder View Post

honestly care less, while perhaps grammatically strange, is the phrase that's used in the U.S.

Not by all Americans.

When using "I could care less", the tone should be sarcastic. Sarcasm is hard to imply in writing so "like I could care less" would work, but "I could not care less" would be preferable.

The phrase "can honestly care less" is not sarcastic and therefore does not mean what marzetta7 wanted it to mean.
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post #433 of 2640
I could honesty NOT care less how it is said.
post #434 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post

Not by all Americans.

When using "I could care less", the tone should be sarcastic. Sarcasm is hard to imply in writing so "like I could care less" would work, but "I could not care less" would be preferable.

The phrase "can honestly care less" is not sarcastic and therefore does not mean what marzetta7 wanted it to mean.

THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU..

EVERY time I read "I could care less" when they actually mean "Couldn't" I go to a state of near self implosion .. It's gotten less annoying over the years, but Joseph wept, it's.. staggeringly stupid.

don't start me on the idiots who wish Apple would "sale" a new iPod, or the spammers one occasionally see posting Nokia xyz phones for "sell"
UGH.

[rant off]

Funny how one can tolerate it in person when its broken english due to it not being a speakers first language.
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post #435 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by icfireball View Post

  • You can bet your bottom dollar that digital copies will have FBI warnings as well.
  • Current cost of storage is prohibative of any mass collection of movies on hard disk right now and probably for the next few years at least.
  • Hard drives will always be liable for failure. You'll have to back up, and that requires 2x storage.
  • Physical media allows for maximum portability and is more universal. Bring it on the road with you. Pop it in someone else's DVD player or computer.
  • DVD data cannot be corrupted like digital media files on hard drive can.
  • Standard media allows for special features.
  • HD-DVD and Blu-Ray offer great HD quality at 1080p, not just 720p as would probably be the best case senario with on-demand.
  • Internet speeds are not to the point where downloads are more convienient than netflixing, using cable on-demand, or just driving to blockbuster.

  • While I haven't downloaded an iTunes movie yet, the TV Shows have no such warning. I would be willing to bet movies don't either.
  • I'd argue the opposite. Cost is cheap! You can buy a 500 GB drive for $95/$120 (internal/external). People have done the math in other threads, but that should be able to hold 25+ 1080p movies. Slap four in a machine, and you have the storage capacity for 100+ movies at the cost of a Blu-Ray player.
  • You wont HAVE to backup, if the place you download from allows for new downloads of purchased material.
  • You want to bring your copy, sync it to the internal drive of the AppleTV and carry that with you. Still portable, and you don't have to worry if the person you are going to has a Blu-Ray or HD DVD player (or none for that matter). The AppleTV is extremely light, easy to carry, not much bigger than 2 DVD cases.
  • DVD data can be corrupted, its called a scratched disk. And in all my years of owning and operating a computer, I've never just had data "go bad" while sitting on a drive.
  • Why wouldn't special features be possible on a digital download?
  • On-demand could support whatever you want, there is no limit unlike HD DVD and Blu-Ray. Why do you feel On-demand is limited to 720p?
  • This has been discussed in other threads before. The time to download a full 1080p movie is not long (6 hours I think it was calculated at todays speeds). Sure, a trip to blockbuster is faster, but people wait a day or two for movies from Netflix. How would a 6 hour download differ?

Edit: for formatting purposes only
post #436 of 2640
Paramount dropping back to BD would be a killer blow, and they would get to sell the Star Trek TOS season 1 HiDef boxset all over again, thats what they do (not unlike Lucas and starwars) so I'd almost say its a given based on that alone

It feels slightly odd that the Mac Pro has been updated and there isn't even a BTO option for HD drives, but then if the driveless MacBookMini is true, then I guess they will pull a "floppy is dead" and be looking at driveless macs from this point on.

Interesting times indeed
I don't see how an anti M$ stance can be seen as a bad thing on an Apple forum I really can't!

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I don't see how an anti M$ stance can be seen as a bad thing on an Apple forum I really can't!

nagromme - According to Amazon: "SpongBob Typing Tutor" is outselling Windows
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post #437 of 2640
There seems to be some question about the accuracy of the Financial Times' report that Paramount will be dropping HD. There's one report that Paramount has denied the claim, calling it speculative.

Just another day in the wacky world of HDM.
post #438 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by kupan787 View Post

You can buy a 500 GB drive for $95/$120 (internal/external). People have done the math in other threads, but that should be able to hold 25+ 1080p movies.

That's allowing 20 GB per movie, which is actually rather generous. HD-DVD and Blu-ray both tend to use higher bit rates than are strictly necessary with the latest generation codecs. If you use High-Profile H.264 (which Apple doesn't support yet), you could get away with about 12 GB for an average-length (100 - 110 mins) 1080p movie. That's 40 movies / 500 GB disc.
it's = it is / it has, its = belonging to it.
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it's = it is / it has, its = belonging to it.
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post #439 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldCodger73 View Post

There seems to be some question about the accuracy of the Financial Times' report that Paramount will be dropping HD. There's one report that Paramount has denied the claim, calling it speculative.

Just another day in the wacky world of HDM.

They are. Give it a couple days. They can't announce it yet.
post #440 of 2640
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldCodger73 View Post

There seems to be some question about the accuracy of the Financial Times' report that Paramount will be dropping HD. There's one report that Paramount has denied the claim, calling it speculative.

Just another day in the wacky world of HDM.


Business as usual for Paramount. Exclusive to HD-DVD/DVD.


http://trekmovie.com/2008/01/08/para...rack-for-2008/
always a newbie
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always a newbie
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