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Google Android dev kit exposes Apple-inspired roots

post #1 of 62
Thread Starter 
The release to developers of Google's Linux-based Android operating system for mobile phones reveals that the prototype software shares at least a few aspects in common with interfaces from the company's Bay Area neighbor, Apple.

Fulfilling a promise it made last week, Google's new early look version of its software development kit provides developers with the open-source tools they need to write new programs ahead of when the first phones ship in the latter half of 2008.

This initial version already taps into most of the features handset makers and third-party developers will need, Google says. Besides access to Google's own search tools, Android provides hooks for 3G data access, hardware 3D acceleration, and music and video playback. Control can stem from either a traditional button layout or a touchscreen.

The code reaches deeply enough that programmers can rewrite the dialer if they choose, the Mountain View, California-based company adds.

However, the kit also includes code that, for some, may confirm Google's increasingly strong ties to Apple, manifested most often for observers by the presence of Google chief Eric Schmidt on Apple's Board of Directors. The most conspicuous link is the choice of the WebKit rendering platform for its web browser -- the same engine that acts as the foundation for Apple's Safari browser on computers and the iPhone. The choice comes despite Google's partial involvement in the development of Mozilla's Firefox browser.

Android's default operating system, found both in a bundled phone emulator and in a demonstration video (shown below), also bears a striking similarity in places to various components of Apple's operating systems. In touchscreen mode, Google's browser also renders pages at full desktop size and relies on taps and finger dragging to scroll through the page.



Other, smaller aspects also appear to draw from lessons learned from the iPhone or the Mac. A main menu for button-focused phones asks users to pick from an icon tray that behaves like the Mac OS X dock; users also flip through their recent web browser history with a Cover Flow-style interface and receive pop-up notices in a translucent window not unlike that seen on the iPhone or iPod touch.

Whether or not these interface similarities will reach shipping products is unknown. In contrast to most closed-source operating systems, none of the handset makers signed up to develop Android-based phones are obligated to leave either the cosmetic appearance of the user interface or the features themselves unaltered.
post #2 of 62
Uh.... what happened to "over 200 patents that we'll vigorously protect"?
post #3 of 62
^^^

No shit.

Amazing rip off of Apple. The contacts icon is almost identical to the address book icon. The look and feel is very reminiscent of Apple.

Oh and it'll come on cheap subsidized phones on 3g and WiMax networks. This is going to be serious competition for the iPhone.
post #4 of 62
Yeah, weird.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #5 of 62
The app launcher UI resembles KDE 4 mockups now on Beta 4.
post #6 of 62
It's an amazingly obvious rip-off. I felt like I was watching an iPhone ad. There has to be more behind this because the Android dock, browser, visual web history and dialer are all clearly derived from either the desktop or mobile versions of OS X. The web history and dialer in particular seem to be complete photocopy jobs. There's no way Google could expect to get away with this without some sort of deal with Apple, so my guess is we'll find out there's something going on behind the scenes when the iPhone SDK is released.
post #7 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by potterhead4 View Post

It's an amazingly obvious rip-off. I felt like I was watching an iPhone ad. There has to be more behind this because the Android dock, browser, visual web history and dialer are all clearly derived from either the desktop or mobile versions of OS X. The web history and dialer in particular seem to be complete photocopy jobs. There's no way Google could expect to get away with this without some sort of deal with Apple, so my guess is we'll find out there's something going on behind the scenes when the iPhone SDK is released.

Well, it's not the GUI which Google is designing, it's the SDK. I guess that this one isn't included in the SDK package, it's just a visual demo to show that it works.
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post #8 of 62
Google can demo this interface all they want without attracting legal trouble. Trouble might only arise if they proceed to sell it. But Google isn't going to sell handsets or the software. Any risk will be undertaken by handset manufacturers. That said, the UI is so similar in appearance to the iPhone, and with Schmidt sitting on Apple's board, I've got to believe Apple has an agreement of some sort with Google and Apple may have played a hand in developing the SDK and demo device. Notice the demo did not show Multi-touch, nor a touch version of cover flow, nor an on-screen keyboard, as those UI features may have been going too obviously far for a FOSS SDK that is unencumbered by Apple intellectual property ownership issues. If Apple is involved, it sure would be nice to know how it stands to benefit from Android.
post #9 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by backtomac View Post

...The contacts icon is almost identical to the address book icon. The look and feel is very reminiscent of Apple....

I was thinking the same thing as I watched the demo video. Actually, I beleive the contact icon was the same one used in 10.0 (I'll have to double check that though). The little folder icon with the sproket and a few others I know I've seen elsewhere though...

To me, I don't think Apple has much to worry about - the demo looked pretty cool, but it will be interesting to see what some of these other companies decide to "create". I think Google is really capitalizing on these other Apple wanabe's who want to come out with the iPhone killer, but can't because they suck at software...

Just like Apple did with the iPod mini - when the competition gets close to a pretty good clone device, all they will do is unveil the next iPhone and completely invalidate the copy-catters.
post #10 of 62
You guys are talking as if Apple and Google are competing against each other, when they are obviously not......

Thinking one-dimensionally:
Google releases a platform which will lead to great phones. Great phones = bad for apple.

Thinking smartly:
Google releases a platform which makes things easier for everyone to develop applications for cellphones, which raises expectations for what people want in cellphones. You want stylish, integrated at a very high level, go with the iPhone.

That's complementary. Not competitive.
Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

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Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

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post #11 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by potterhead4 View Post

It's an amazingly obvious rip-off. I felt like I was watching an iPhone ad. There has to be more behind this because the Android dock, browser, visual web history and dialer are all clearly derived from either the desktop or mobile versions of OS X. The web history and dialer in particular seem to be complete photocopy jobs. There's no way Google could expect to get away with this without some sort of deal with Apple, so my guess is we'll find out there's something going on behind the scenes when the iPhone SDK is released.

What the hell are you talking about?

"OH MY GOSH, GOOGLE MAPS SCROLLING ON ANDROID?!?!? THAT IS A RIP OFF OF TEH IPHONE!!!"

Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

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Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

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post #12 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

You guys are talking as if Apple and Google are competing against each other, when they are obviously not......

Thinking one-dimensionally:
Google releases a platform which will lead to great phones. Great phones = bad for apple.

Thinking smartly:
Google releases a platform which makes things easier for everyone to develop applications for cellphones, which raises expectations for what people want in cellphones. You want stylish, integrated at a very high level, go with the iPhone.

That's complementary. Not competitive.

Well let's hope so.

But I'm old enough to remember a former software developer that developed an os that mimicked Apple that ended up on cheap hardware sold by other vendors.

We all know how that turned out.

The real danger for the iPhone is that Android doesn't have to be better than the iPhone user interface. If it offers 80% of iPhone functionality that could be enough because it will likely come on really cheap or free phones. And likely will integrate new technology like 3g or Wimax faster than Apple.
post #13 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foo2 View Post

If Apple is involved, it sure would be nice to know how it stands to benefit from Android.

I believe Apple wants to wrestle the internet away from IE, so the use of Webkit in that SDK is a big plus. Remember, there are over 3 billion cell phones in the world right now and Android is aimed straight at the middle of the pack, so that would make a lot of web capable phones out there, all of them requiring standards-compliant web pages...
post #14 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by backtomac View Post

Well let's hope so.

But I'm old enough to remember a former software developer that developed an os that mimicked Apple that ended up on cheap hardware sold by other vendors.

We all know how that turned out.

The real danger for the iPhone is that Android doesn't have to be better than the iPhone user interface. If it offers 80% of iPhone functionality that could be enough because it will likely come on really cheap or free phones. And likely will integrate new technology like 3g or Wimax faster than Apple.

As long as Apple opens up its SDK, things should be ok.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PyxWnIalDcY

Did anyone hear how it lets you take whatever information it has available to find your global position? GPS, Cell Towers, or WiFi hotspots. Exciting stuff. I'd love to see Apple incorporate that into the next iPhone.
Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

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Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

Ste...
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post #15 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

As long as Apple opens up its SDK, things should be ok.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PyxWnIalDcY

Did anyone hear how it lets you take whatever information it has available to find your global position? GPS, Cell Towers, or WiFi hotspots. Exciting stuff. I'd love to see Apple incorporate that into the next iPhone.

I did hear that. But what I really noticed was how the functionality of the phone wasn't buried in a lot of menus. Functions are easy to find...like on the iPhone.
post #16 of 62
Google pulled a Vista.
post #17 of 62
There's no doubt that the iPhone has changed the direction of the mobile phone world. Google Android obviously borrows heavily from the iPhone UI.

But I think it's safe to say Steve Jobs and Apple have some great tricks up their sleeves. Apple will continue to lead while everyone else continues to play catch-up.

The next couple of years are going to be interesting. Very interesting.
post #18 of 62
Lol poor Sergey ..."someone get me a Fu@#$in t-shirt...im not being the PC guy!!"
post #19 of 62
There's no doubt going to be similarities, but from a consumer point of view I don't see how the existence of 'Android' is going to make you want an iPhone any less. The whole reason the iPhone works, is because Apple are not only the best and software, but also because they are the best when it comes to cool, elegant hardware too, and the fact that it's also an iPod that works with iTunes, and it all integrates seamlessly. Android is a good attempt, but it doesn't even redraw the webpages anything like OS X on the iPhone.
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post #20 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

What the hell are you talking about?

"OH MY GOSH, GOOGLE MAPS SCROLLING ON ANDROID?!?!? THAT IS A RIP OFF OF TEH IPHONE!!!"


Actually, I said the dock, dialer and web browser (specifically the visual history) had elements that seemed to rip off parts of both the mobile and desktop versions of OS X. I specifically didn't mention the maps application because it's obvious iPhone and Android look similar: they both use Google maps.

Please accurately represent my comments when attempting to satirize them. It gives you a lot more credibility.
post #21 of 62
I don't really see any resemblance to the iPhone, or OS X...maybe the browser history but that's about it.

Second off, why would you want Apple to be the only one doing this?? Android will hopefully bring great cell phone features for a cheaper price. How the hell can you be against that? These are companies and when it comes down to it. I not only want choice, I want the most for my money. Competition is great, and as much as I love Apple it would be sad if they were the only game in town.
post #22 of 62
I would have to agree that Android's use of Webkit is a good thing for Apple, as it would force more websites (banking and the like) to support Safari. Since Safari is on Macs, iPhones, and now iPods (touch), this is great news for potential switchers.

I also would agree that Steve and the rest have tons more tricks up their sleeves. Apple is all about innovative interface design on top of solid foundations; what many forget is that those solid foundations were created with the help of the Open Source community. That is Apple's big trick: they innovate on the back of open source development, which allows them to always stay one step ahead of that same community. Ultimately this makes closed, proprietary development (read "Microsoft") increasingly more expensive while maintaining a steady income from people willing to pay a premium for a smooth, advanced UI.

I think the real winners are consumers: we will soon have cheap phones with real OS's, and apps for cellphones will finally work based on minimum hardware requirements (screen size, available memory) regardless of model or brand. Cellphones will finally displace the Palm market as Jobs predicted.
post #23 of 62
you think this is Apple's way to get an "iPhone" like devices for other companies?

But I like how you can look in the city using like camera I guess...I dunno how they do it. But I am getting one of these phones when they come to Sprint.
post #24 of 62
I think this could end up being the iPhone for he masses. People who would like an open iPhone that supports any carrier and a SIM card for international use. As long as Apple choses to stick with one carrier and not allow users t switch carriers then they are creating a market for people to look at other devices. I would LOVE to have a iPhone, the cost of the device is not the issue, but the fact that I wouls be tied to once carrier and when I travel abroad I can not replace the SIM card with a local for for my destination.
So an Android powered phone may very well be the solution for me... Shame...
post #25 of 62
I guess it will take only a few moments for enthusiastic software developers and hackers to try this version of Android on the iPhone. Then we can compare Android and OSX Mobile side by side on the same hardware. Judging by the demo videos Android seems pretty slow, but perhaps that's what iPhone felt like too 1 year prior to launch.

I like the Android initiative. The world needs an open phone platform. Good that someone finally defies the commercial world. Good initiative.
post #26 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by daratbastid View Post

Lol poor Sergey ..."someone get me a Fu@#$in t-shirt...im not being the PC guy!!"

He still looks like he just got out of bed though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Foo2

Google can demo this interface all they want without attracting legal trouble. Trouble might only arise if they proceed to sell it. But Google isn't going to sell handsets or the software. Any risk will be undertaken by handset manufacturers.

Yeah that's really what they are demoing, a concept of what people can do with the platform.

The implementation wasn't as nice as the iphone - slow response, non-fluid interface - but if it's competitively priced, it may bring this level of functionality to a greater number of mobile devices.

It's not popularizing OS X but with some clear common ground, greater compatibility is welcome. Apple just can't reach the lower-end markets properly so what better way to do it than for google to make an open Mac/iphone compatible system and let the phone makers do what they want.

It could seriously affect Microsoft's presence in the mobile market and a greater number of websites will have to be webkit compatible which helps all of us.

The only problem might be is if they make the SDK so open that people manage to find ways to make them incompatible with other devices.
post #27 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by macmac6 View Post

I think this could end up being the iPhone for he masses.

I was thinking more for the geek niche than the masses. It's Open Source so I could hack it how I wanted it, which I can't do with the iPhone, WinMo, Symbian, Palm... The only exception being OpenMoko.

Quote:
Originally Posted by palegolas View Post

I guess it will take only a few moments for enthusiastic software developers and hackers to try this version of Android on the iPhone.

Android is Java based. There's no Java on the iPhone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by palegolas View Post

Then we can compare Android and OSX Mobile side by side on the same hardware. Judging by the demo videos Android seems pretty slow, but perhaps that's what iPhone felt like too 1 year prior to launch.

...and it's Java and the hardware requirements are much lower than the iPhone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by palegolas View Post

I like the Android initiative. The world needs an open phone platform. Good that someone finally defies the commercial world. Good initiative.

It certainly does although it's not the first. Google's backing and $10M bounty for 3rd party developer's applications helps a lot. I'd like to see Apple be as proactive with 3rd parties come February's release of their SDK.
post #28 of 62
Well, I just did a preliminary pass through some of the developer's documentation. Seems like it should *eventually* be possible to run Java-based Android apps on the iPhone. You'd just need to port the virtual machine with the APIs over. Not necessarily a trivial task, and it'd depend on what Apple provides in their SDK, but I can see it happening.
post #29 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmjoe View Post

Well, I just did a preliminary pass through some of the developer's documentation. Seems like it should *eventually* be possible to run Java-based Android apps on the iPhone. You'd just need to port the virtual machine with the APIs over. Not necessarily a trivial task, and it'd depend on what Apple provides in their SDK, but I can see it happening.

Well, you may not need a virtual machine per se, since the vanilla version of the CPU used in the iPhone is supposed to be able to directly interpret Java byte code. You *would* however need a way to encapsulate the CPU's Java interpreter to reside within inside an ARM-native OSX process (much like the THUMB and ARM instruction sets can currently be interchanged in other hybrid ARM-based operating systems), and you would need a set of class libraries (APIs) capable of communicating with the outside world through that encapsulation.

But that would probably require specific extensions to OSX on Apple's part, whereas a completely software-based virtual machine would likely be doable by a 3rd party using only a full-featured SDK.
post #30 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by aegisdesign View Post

Android is Java based. There's no Java on the iPhone.

.... Google's backing and $10M bounty for 3rd party developer's applications helps a lot. I'd like to see Apple be as proactive with 3rd parties come February's release of their SDK.

Oh man.. I totally got this wrong. I don't understand this. It will only run on hardware that take Java instructions? Or does it run under a software java engine? I thought you could just compile it for any hardware. I don't know so much about java compatible hardware.. but it doesn't sound good...

Would be really cool if Apple announced something similar when they release their SDK. Agreed. But don't they do this already, kind of? But not as actively. They have this award once a year don't they?
post #31 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by palegolas View Post

Oh man.. I totally got this wrong. I don't understand this. It will only run on hardware that take Java instructions? Or does it run under a software java engine? I thought you could just compile it for any hardware. I don't know so much about java compatible hardware.. but it doesn't sound good...

Would be really cool if Apple announced something similar when they release their SDK. Agreed. But don't they do this already, kind of? But not as actively. They have this award once a year don't they?

There are two broad implementations of Java - a software-based virtual machine which is what we have on most PCs, and a hardware-based solution.

In principle, the exact same Java bytecode will execute under either implementation as long as class libraries exist exposing all the APIs that are expected by the application.

Typically, a hardware-based interpreter has the potential to offer better performance than a software-based virtual machine, all other things being equal.
post #32 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

This initial version already taps into most of the features handset makers and third-party developers will need, Google says. Besides access to Google's own search tools, Android provides hooks for 3G data access, hardware 3D acceleration, and music and video playback. Control can stem from either a traditional button layout or a touchscreen.

The code reaches deeply enough that programmers can rewrite the dialer if they choose, the Mountain View, California-based company adds.

However, the kit also includes code that, for some, may confirm Google's increasingly strong ties to Apple, manifested most often for observers by the presence of Google chief Eric Schmidt on Apple's Board of Directors. The most conspicuous link is the choice of the WebKit rendering platform for its web browser -- the same engine that acts as the foundation for Apple's Safari browser on computers and the iPhone. The choice comes despite Google's partial involvement in the development of Mozilla's Firefox browser.

Android's default operating system, found both in a bundled phone emulator and in a demonstration video (shown below), also bears a striking similarity in places to various components of Apple's operating systems. In touchscreen mode, Google's browser also renders pages at full desktop size and relies on taps and finger dragging to scroll through the page.



Other, smaller aspects also appear to draw from lessons learned from the iPhone or the Mac. A main menu for button-focused phones asks users to pick from an icon tray that behaves like the Mac OS X dock; users also flip through their recent web browser history with a Cover Flow-style interface and receive pop-up notices in a translucent window not unlike that seen on the iPhone or iPod touch.


So this must be one of those Steve Job's comments regarding the iPhone "and boy have we patented it" loopholes, huh?

"Et tu Steve", and for what, Google maps??

Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

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Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

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post #33 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post

So this must be one of those Steve Job's comments regarding the iPhone "and boy have we patented it" loopholes, huh?

"Et tu Steve", and for what, Google maps??

I'm sure Steve asked for CoverFlow




Quote:
Actually, I said the dock, dialer and web browser (specifically the visual history) had elements that seemed to rip off parts of both the mobile and desktop versions of OS X. I specifically didn't mention the maps application because it's obvious iPhone and Android look similar: they both use Google maps.

Please accurately represent my comments when attempting to satirize them. It gives you a lot more credibility.

That's the point. You picked on

1: web history, which is not even on the iPhone. Maybe you were confused by Tabbed browsing?
2: dialer, which every phone since the LCD screen has had one. Maybe you thought that the iPhone was the first phone in the history of cellular communications to offer a dialer?
3: browser, as if Apple is the inventor of the web browser, not UIUC with Mosaic.

Maybe you should have picked on Google Maps, since that was the only thing that makes sense to compare original features between the iPhone and the android platform.

Whatever the case, your statement "It's an amazingly obvious rip-off. I felt like I was watching an iPhone ad" is ridiculously out of proportion and unfounded.
Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

Ste...
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Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

Ste...
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post #34 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

Whatever the case, your statement "It's an amazingly obvious rip-off. I felt like I was watching an iPhone ad" is ridiculously out of proportion and unfounded.

Maybe a bit of an exaggeration, but unfounded?

So you don't think the app launcher bears a little resemblance to the dock?

The contacts app doesn't look almost identical to the address book app in osx?

The biggest feature in Android that mimics Apple is making functions easily accessible. They're not buried in sub menus. Certainly something that Apple didn't and couldn't patent but I think you're ignoring the obvious if you deny that's not the case.
post #35 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by lfmorrison View Post

There are two broad implementations of Java - a software-based virtual machine which is what we have on most PCs, and a hardware-based solution.

In principle, the exact same Java bytecode will execute under either implementation as long as class libraries exist exposing all the APIs that are expected by the application.

Typically, a hardware-based interpreter has the potential to offer better performance than a software-based virtual machine, all other things being equal.

From what I understood of the Android intro video, the Android OS includes a Java Virtual Machine to run the Java Apps. So it isn't tied to any hardware requirement that the iPhone doesn't have. If you can get drivers for the iPhone hardware to run Linux, then you could run Android and use all it's apps.

Android is good thing(tm).
It is better for Apple to be competing/cooperating with Google than for the cellphone world to be dominated by disparate/incompatible technologies, especially Windows Mobile.

Android is Open Source, so Apple could jump on at any time and include a Java VM on the iPhone that runs Android apps(doubt it).

Android based phones won't be available till the end of 2008. By then the iPhone will have evolved and diversified. The OS X is a FAST moving target. In the last 7 years we have seen 5 major releases of Mac OS X.

By the end of 2008 we will have a slew of 3rd party iPhone apps already shipping. Developers love programming for OS X...XCode, Cocoa, CoreImage, CoreAudio, CoreVideo, CoreAnimation. Java is frumpy and so not sexy.

WebKit on Android is a big boost for Safari and Web Standards. More web developers will make the effort of testing and designing for Safari. Apple should be able to offer the best mobile web experience on any cell phone.
post #36 of 62
I think the reasons for choosing WebKit have less to do with Apple and more do with reasons of practicality:

Webkit was orginally based on on the open source web rendering engine KHTML. Apple provided many improvements and also made a small architecture that made it easier to port to different operating systems and hardware. This change, and the fact it is open source, has made the work of porting it to different environments much easier. Added to this the fact that many different entities, whether it be companies or individuals, are contributing to Webkit and its efficient design, further help in making it a number one choice for anyone wanting a general purpose web rendering engine.

Sure there are other rendering engines around, but they fail for a number of reasons:
- IE: Intel & Windows centric and fails to follow W3C guidelines, , controlled by one company
- Gecko (basis of Firefox): Increasingly bloated.
- Opera: Closed source, controlled by one company

For non-Windows based mobile platforms Webkit is the obvious first choice.
post #37 of 62
The support for a JVM is one thing I feel is missing from the iPhone and iPod touch. There may have been reasons for this, but if they could at least provide J2ME based JVM that would be sweet.

As for the rest of what Android has to offer, it is quite possible that Apple might want to include the best features, just to keep ahead of the game.
post #38 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

That's the point. You picked on

1: web history, which is not even on the iPhone. Maybe you were confused by Tabbed browsing?
2: dialer, which every phone since the LCD screen has had one. Maybe you thought that the iPhone was the first phone in the history of cellular communications to offer a dialer?
3: browser, as if Apple is the inventor of the web browser, not UIUC with Mosaic.

Ugh, really? The web history resembles both coverflow and the iPhone's interface for selecting between multiple open pages. The dialer has a very similar UI and icons, and the browser features many of the same conventions as Safari on the iPhone. Enough with this strawman crap, please.
post #39 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

I'm sure Steve asked for CoverFlow






That's the point. You picked on

1: web history, which is not even on the iPhone. Maybe you were confused by Tabbed browsing?
2: dialer, which every phone since the LCD screen has had one. Maybe you thought that the iPhone was the first phone in the history of cellular communications to offer a dialer?
3: browser, as if Apple is the inventor of the web browser, not UIUC with Mosaic.

Maybe you should have picked on Google Maps, since that was the only thing that makes sense to compare original features between the iPhone and the android platform.

Whatever the case, your statement "It's an amazingly obvious rip-off. I felt like I was watching an iPhone ad" is ridiculously out of proportion and unfounded.


First off, it is a lot like the iPhone -- http://www.silverspider.com/wp-conte.../01/iphone.jpg see that chat for the iPhone? Now go and look at the Android, it all has similar aspects -- as in it's all in one page, verses different pages like a normal phone. And the dock is very similar to what OS X has, not really what the iPhone has.

With all of that said, we have no idea what Android actually looks like. This doesn't seem to be a very Google-ish design, and they have a very basic, simple, but stylish design. I mean, look at gmail. Look at Google's web site. It's simple. It's elegant. Look at the Android. It's simple, sure, but it is far from elegant and far from what I would call Google.


And in Google's defense to the chat reference like I mentioned, in case someone agrees it's "copying Apple", look at how Google Talk looks like. It's...just like Android!

A couple more things before I end my post. Someone said it was slow, well the requirements are 200mhz and up (CPU). I don't know about you, but thats a slow processor.... and what if he was living with the slow processor? WOuld make since, you have to make sure it works even for the cheap phones, right?

Anyway, I want to end my....really useless post with this: we don't know what Android is going to look like. This was to developers, to anyone who might want to download the SDK and make some software. It was not intended to be critiqued as the real thing. Am I saying Android will not look like this? No. I am just merely repeating other peoples statements that we don't know what it looks like.
post #40 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny Mozzarella View Post

If you can get drivers for the iPhone hardware to run Linux, then you could run Android and use all it's apps.

This is just technobabble. Do you know what drivers are? What Linux is? What a JVM is? Or are these just words you picked up and repeat?

Android was an acquisition by Google a long time ago. The company was doing this stuff long before Apple was doing the iPhone. Allegations of "copying" iPhone are unsubstantiated (at best). Oh, and porting a JVM to the iPhone won't get you Android. The ability to run Java is nothing: it's the class libraries that provide the Android application environment, and they impose certain hardware and native software requirements on the platform.

Quote:
By the end of 2008 we will have a slew of 3rd party iPhone apps already shipping.

Again, an assumption that you will get an SDK on time, and that the legal and commercial requirements for app signing don't deter 3rd parties.

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Developers love programming for OS X...XCode, Cocoa, CoreImage, CoreAudio, CoreVideo, CoreAnimation. Java is frumpy and so not sexy.

Since you know jack sh1t about Java, I'll let your comment pass.

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WebKit on Android is a big boost for Safari and Web Standards. More web developers will make the effort of testing and designing for Safari. Apple should be able to offer the best mobile web experience on any cell phone.

Yeah yeah, whatever.
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