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Laplace Symbol in Latex!!!

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I need someone to give me a guide to writing the Laplace symbol in Latex. I am using Scientific Word. I know that one needs to use the mathrsfs.sty file and some font definition files, but I don't know how to put all these together and into the right folders for my Scientific Word installation.

At the moment, I have placed the mathrsfs.sty and .me files inside TCITeX/TeX/LaTeX/Contrib/Supported/

..and I have put the font files inside a folder in the /fonts/ directory.

I included the mathrsfs in my preamble as

\\usepackage{mathrsfs}

and I also added it as a package NATIVELY.

In my document, I use

\\mathscr{L}

But, I just get an ordinary L.

Please, help!!!
post #2 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Penarity View Post

I need someone to give me a guide to writing the Laplace symbol in Latex. ...

Do you mean Laplace as in Laplace transform or the Laplacian as in partial differential equations? The symbol for Laplace transform is L(s). The symbol for the Laplacian is also known as del or nabla squared (^2).

Laplace's Equation: ^2 Ψ(r) = 0.
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Me View Post

Do you mean Laplace as in Laplace transform or the Laplacian as in partial differential equations? The symbol for Laplace transform is L(s). The symbol for the Laplacian is also known as del or nabla squared (^2).

Laplace's Equation: ^2 Ψ(r) = 0.

Thanks, Mr.Me. I am referring to the Laplace (L). It is written in a curly style as written in ftp://cam.ctan.org/tex-archive/info/...criptfonts.pdf
Thanks.
post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Penarity View Post

Thanks, Mr.Me. I am referring to the Laplace (L). It is written in a curly style as written in ftp://cam.ctan.org/tex-archive/info/...criptfonts.pdf
Thanks.

There is no such thing as the "Laplace." There is the differential operator, the Laplacian, which is represented as ∇^2 and the Laplace transform. As best as I can tell, you want to use the Laplace transform. This is the mathematical operation that is sometimes represented by the script-L. However, the script-L is purely optional. You may use an italic serif Roman L. If you insist on using a script L, then you may use any similar script font including Zapf Chancery which is an old standard vector font. You may also consider one of the free fonts from Blue Sky TeX Systems.
post #5 of 7
I think you're looking for one of the following

$ \
abla^2 f $
$ \\Delta f $
$ \\mathcal{L} ( f ) $
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by ric_g View Post

I think you're looking for one of the following

$ \
abla^2 f $
$ \\Delta f $
$ \\mathcal{L} ( f ) $

Um-m-m-m, no. The OP was looking for the symbol for the Laplace transform, which is an integral operator; not the symbol for the Laplacian, which is a differential operator.
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Me View Post

Um-m-m-m, no. The OP was looking for the symbol for the Laplace transform, which is an integral operator; not the symbol for the Laplacian, which is a differential operator.

That's the third option in what ric_g proposed. This will use by default the cmsy font family. And to go a little fancy, one could even use some fraktur or Euler family font for that L (although usually the fraktur families are kept for Lie groups and algebras). Many people also prefer the rsfs family for calligraphic symbols.
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