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setting your startup disk via contextural menues...

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Don't you think apple should make it so you can control click on a disk and have a option that says "set as startup disk". I think that would be awsome!!
post #2 of 13
Good idea. Sent to Apple feedback?

Amorya
post #3 of 13
that seems ohkay, but it should be an option, as should the dock. I want my monitor space back!!!!
post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 
[quote]Originally posted by Nebagakid:
<strong>that seems ohkay, but it should be an option, as should the dock. I want my monitor space back!!!!</strong><hr></blockquote>

It is called dock hiding
post #5 of 13
I dunno about this one, how often do you swap startup disks? I don't do it that often, dont think it justifies a place in the contextual menu, there are other more important things to be in there, maybe have it the file menu or something...
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post #6 of 13
In contextual menus, just as everywhere else, designers and engineers have a responsibility to limit your choices to a degree to keep the system comprehensible. That responsibility has to be considered when implementing things such as you propose, that may or may not be useful to have in a contextual menu when weighed against the clutter they create.

If contextual menu plugins that can do exactly what you want aren't available in Mac OS X, I'd be (not literally) petitioning Apple to implement them. That way, you could submit a single argument for all of the contextual menu items you'll ever think of.

[quote]It is called dock hiding<hr></blockquote>

Not if your apps take advantage of Aqua. Apple folks such as John Geleynse - an ex-Corel Marketing guy, now Apple's User Experience Technology Manager - advocate the use of empty space to guide the user's eye through the interface; that versus lines and boxes in Mac OS 9.

[ 01-01-2002: Message edited by: Mac The Fork ]</p>
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post #7 of 13
Not if your apps take advantage of Aqua. Apple folks such as John Geleynse - an ex-Corel Marketing guy, now Apple's User Experience Technology Manager - advocate the use of empty space to guide the user's eye through the interface; that versus lines and boxes in Mac OS 9.

Care to provide a link?
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post #8 of 13
<a href="http://www.digitalmedievalist.com/wwdc/aqua.html" target="_blank">http://www.digitalmedievalist.com/wwdc/aqua.html</a>

It's a summary of a seminar hosted by Geleynse, so if you wanted something verbatim, you'd have to have been at whatever WWDC that was.

[ 01-01-2002: Message edited by: Mac The Fork ]</p>
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post #9 of 13
interesting... yet I don't quite understand how classic guides the user's eyes via lines and boxes?
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post #10 of 13
In OS 9, the style was to visually separate groups of controls from unrelated controls by putting rectangles around them (group boxes). In Mac OS X, you are more likely to see either white space or a single line. The lines and such don't actually show your eyes where to go.

[ 01-01-2002: Message edited by: Mac The Fork ]</p>
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post #11 of 13
The idea with the "white space" in OS X is just simple gestalt theory in the visual fields. See Arnheim's or Gombrich's books.

I tend to think that changing startup disks via a contextual menu is ultra-specific for every user to have (those menus start to get really long). But I'm all for contextual menu plug-ins. Anyway, off to Jonathan's feature thread...

[ 01-01-2002: Message edited by: BuonRotto ]</p>
post #12 of 13
[quote]The idea with the "white space" in OS X is just simple gestalt theory in the visual fields. See Arnheim's or Gombrich's books.<hr></blockquote>

This might be easier:

oooo
oooo

oooo
oooo

oooo

How many groups of os are there? Three. You tend to see groups based on how much space there is between individual parts.

[ 01-01-2002: Message edited by: Mac The Fork ]</p>
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post #13 of 13
Thanks, Fork, I was feeling lazy and being a bit of a name-dropper.

just to keep this post from a being a complete waste, here's another compare/contrast example:

w/out linest\t\tw/lines:

ooooooo\t\t\t\tooooooo
ooooooo\t\t\t\tooooooo
\t\t\t\t\t-------
ooooooo\t\t\t\tooooooo
\t\t\t\t\t-------
ooooooo\t\t\t\tooooooo
ooooooo\t\t\t\tooooooo

[ 01-01-2002: Message edited by: BuonRotto ]</p>
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