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Early iPhone SDK; T-Mobile iPhone unlock in iTunes; more

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Apple may not be waiting to get developers started on writing programs for the iPhone. Also, the first official unlock method for the iPhone is active and only requires iTunes -- plus the right phone ID -- to work.

Apple handing out advance iPhone developer kits?

Apple is giving a few preferred companies a headstart on writing native programs for the iPhone with an early software development kit, according to a fresh claim by Electronista.

The unverified but purportedly reliable sources tell the technology site that a few companies have received their kits two weeks ago, months ahead of the official February release of the tools.

The description appears to confirm hints given by Apple marketing VP Greg Joswiak in a recent interview that promise an contained programming environment. Rather than write in a typical programming environment, the developer kit will "mediate" the code and allow Apple to maintain a buffer between the phone itself and programmers.

Writing native third-party programs for the iPhone is much like writing for Google's OpenSocial platform for applications shared between social networking sites and has its limits, the report says.

None of the companies are named, but a "major social networking site" is at least exploring the concept of a native iPhone program, according to the rumor.

T-Mobile's iPhone unlock uses iTunes

Germans buying the new unlocked iPhone are asked to do so through Apple's iTunes software in a way that continues to give the iPhone maker control over the activation process, according to a testing by a German Mac fan website.

Instead of receiving an unlock code over the phone or visiting a store, customers buy a standard 399 iPhone and choose to pay an extra 600 to unlock the device in iTunes. The software then reportedly compares the phone's IMEI, or its worldwide cellular identification number, to an Apple database which determines whether the phone can be unlocked -- giving the California firm final control over the process.

The whole process takes no more than 24 hours but can activate a fully unlocked phone within seconds, say anecdotal reports from early adopters contacting the fan site.

Hearing on T-Mobile iPhone sales due this week

A Hamburg court announced on Monday that it will hold a hearing for rival provider Vodafone's legal complaint about the exclusivity of the iPhone this Thursday, November 29th.

The hearing will be T-Mobile Germany's first opportunity to defend the deal with Apple, which gave T-Mobile sole rights to sell the iPhone in the country and which locked the phone to outside firms. Vodafone successfully argued last week that the exclusivity was anti-competitive and obtained an injunction that currently forces T-Mobile to allow an unlocked version of the cellphone that works with any carrier.

T-Mobile maintains that it has done nothing wrong and says its deal will survive the legal process.

Report: Apple ahead of the curve in touchscreen yields

The iPhone and iPod touch are leading the touchscreen market when it comes to useful production units, says a report from DigiTimes.

The Taiwan publication cites suppliers who claim a 90 percent adhesion rate between the glass and touch input layers for all of Apple's touchscreen displays, guaranteeing that relatively few of the screens have to be rejected during production. By contrast, competing products only achieve yields between 70 and 80 percent.

Apple's challengers will catch up and reach the 90 percent marker sometime next year but will be overshadowed by further gains from Apple in the same period, the report adds.
post #2 of 11
>>None of the companies are named, but a "major social networking site" is at least exploring the concept of a native iPhone program, according to the rumor.

Good lord, just what we need... more Facebook type crap. Between that and YouTube on the iPhone, the useful to wasteful ratio is plummeting.
post #3 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Report: Apple ahead of the curve in touchscreen yields

The iPhone and iPod touch are leading the touchscreen market when it comes to useful production units, says a report from DigiTimes.

The Taiwan publication cites suppliers who claim a 90 percent adhesion rate between the glass and touch input layers for all of Apple's touchscreen displays, guaranteeing that relatively few of the screens have to be rejected during production. By contrast, competing products only achieve yields between 70 and 80 percent.

Apple's challengers will catch up and reach the 90 percent marker sometime next year but will be overshadowed by further gains from Apple in the same period, the report adds.

I thought Apple just buys their touch screens. Did Apple design all their own touch technology and chemistry too?
post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I thought Apple just buys their touch screens. Did Apple design all their own touch technology and chemistry too?

Theoretically they should come from a german outfit called Balda. A TS manufacturer would have a vested interest in increasing its yield anyway as less "spillage" means more bang for your buck.
post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

T-Mobile's iPhone unlock uses iTunes

Germans buying the new unlocked iPhone are asked to do so through Apple's iTunes software in a way that continues to give the iPhone maker control over the activation process, according to a testing by a German Mac fan website.

Instead of receiving an unlock code over the phone or visiting a store, customers buy a standard 399 iPhone and choose to pay an extra 600 to unlock the device in iTunes. The software then reportedly compares the phone's IMEI, or its worldwide cellular identification number, to an Apple database which determines whether the phone can be unlocked -- giving the California firm final control over the process.

The whole process takes no more than 24 hours but can activate a fully unlocked phone within seconds, say anecdotal reports from early adopters contacting the fan site.

No you pay the full price at the point of sale not in iTunes. The unlocking takes place via iTunes

But what is more interesting then this is the fact that those unlocked phone STILL do not work with any SIM. It seems that Apple was advised by someone from outside Europe when designing the machine, as it never seemed to occur to "someone" that tech-savy early adopters use multiple SIM when traveling and this to avoid the extortionate GPRS roaming fees (...and this is my 4000 Euro/$ phone bill....).

The phone even refuses basic telephony when faced with such cards. It will only do so (funny enough) when you apply the "usual" pieces of software used for illegal unlocks - then everything becomes hunkydory again.
post #6 of 11
600 Euro is a hefty block of money. I guess that it includes the fees that T-Mobile would have to pay to Apple if the phone had been on a contract with them, and extra money to make the phone sale profitable for them (rather than break-even, perhaps). And enough money to dissuade people from actually buying the unlocked version.
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by freelander51 View Post

No you pay the full price at the point of sale not in iTunes. The unlocking takes place via iTunes

But what is more interesting then this is the fact that those unlocked phone STILL do not work with any SIM. It seems that Apple was advised by someone from outside Europe when designing the machine, as it never seemed to occur to "someone" that tech-savy early adopters use multiple SIM when traveling and this to avoid the extortionate GPRS roaming fees (...and this is my 4000 Euro/$ phone bill....).

The phone even refuses basic telephony when faced with such cards. It will only do so (funny enough) when you apply the "usual" pieces of software used for illegal unlocks - then everything becomes hunkydory again.

So if they are unlocked, what do you mean that they don't work with any SIM??

What SIM cards do they work with then?
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by irnchriz View Post

So if they are unlocked, what do you mean that they don't work with any SIM??

What SIM cards do they work with then?

probably german SIMs... i don't know.
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jp ferreira: in my life..
http://www.jpferreira.com.br

ayala!goebb comunicação + negócios
http://www.ayalagoebb.com.br
Reply
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by irnchriz View Post

So if they are unlocked, what do you mean that they don't work with any SIM??

What SIM cards do they work with then?

I would be interested to know this as well
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sedicivalvole View Post

I would be interested to know this as well

Understandable

The officially unlocked iPhone seems to have extreme difficulties with SIM cards its does not know (ie not a network where the iPhone is sold). It is a poor interpretation of national caller ID. The phone literally rejects the "unknown" SIM even for phone calls if you use a SIM from a non endorsed network in a non endorsed country. From a Cuppertino/US centric point of view the question seems to be "why would someone put any SIM card into the device other then the one that is meant to be in there ?"

Well I have the answer : stingy Europeans who dont want to pay 15 Euro (about 20$) per MB data whilst roaming. Example needed ? Glad to help !

I have normally a belgian SIM in my E50 and check my emails every 10 minutes (no push). When I cross the border to (say) Germany or France this pleasure would cost me 15 Euro per MB, which in all fairness seems a bit steep when you consider that a DSL flatrate is 40 Euro....

So in goes the german or french (or UK) SIM. The Nokia reconfigures the APN used nd i check my mails. For phonecalls i have to either use a 2nd phone or divert my belgian number to the french/german/UK number.

Sounds like a lot of hassle - but it aint. 2 Min. of you time tops. But if you are independant and have to pay for your own phonebills this actually matters....

So YES in the US you only need one SIM to go coast to coast and never have to pay (data) roaming fees. In Europe you have to -even if you stoically stay in (say) the T-Mobile/Vodafone/Whatever networks.
post #11 of 11
Ah I see.

I have coughed up for an iPhone but being from the Uk don't see Europe very often unless its from staring accross the channel
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