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Is OS X really easier than XP?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
First of all, I have been a Windows user for years and never owned a Mac. The new Imac has really caught my eye and I'm thinking about making the switch. The only thing holding me back is the OS X. Everything thing else, itools, iapps, design are to good to pass up. Considering I have been a Windows user for so long, I asked myself, can I handle switching to a new OS? Since I was curious I went down to a computer store and played around with a Mac and OS X. For some reason I didn't find it as easy to use as XP. I love the look of the OS, simply beautiful but I was kinda lost. I just couldn't get into using the OS for some reason. My friend has an iBook and he's gonna let me borrow it so I can have some serious sit down time with. Hopefully it will just take some time cause I really wanna switch. This might sound dumb but in Windows you can fully maximize windows to cover the whole screen. This might sound dumb, but why don't windows in OS X cover the whole screen when you maximize? Anyways, if anyone could share some insight, that would be great.


Thanks
post #2 of 21
So why do you expect Mac OS X to behave exactly like Windows XP? Windows in the Mac OS don't "maximize"--they resize to the minimal size possible to show their entire contents (if the application was programmed the right way, that is). That's why the button is called the resize button--not the maximize button.
post #3 of 21
That's the main difference for me bewteen windows and the mac.

In windo$e, the window is full screen and you never really see the desktop.

In mac, the window is just a window and we tend to leave room so we can see the desktop. Personally, I don't go full screen with any app, so i can quickly click on a background window.

Now that I think about it, mac is more windows-like then windows is. Windows should instead be called "window" as they only see one window most of the time.
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post #4 of 21
I've been a Mac user for 3 years, because of some reason (my college only provided PCs), i've to switched to PC ... so, i am on PC for another 3 years, and i going back to MAC this month because i really tried so hard on PC and it's really a as suck as u could imagine, don't just think about Window Window, in PC world, they r alwiz a lot of works when u setup or resetup ur PC, over MAC, a dummy can do it well by some basic training or understanding. Using Mac make u feel professional . Forgot the window maximize problem, it's just a small problem to urgue, think big, think different,welcome to MAC world
yuz
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post #5 of 21
"Ease of use" means for many people simply "the way we have always done". When I switched over to OS 9 from Win95 I had real trouble for two weeks or so, but after I got used to the little differences I found them much more practical and logical. Now I've been working with OS X for some months - same case here.
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post #6 of 21
Actually, if you spend some time exploring something, anything will be easy. But do keep an open mind when trying out something new, as being bias can cloud your thinking

Perhaps you can go down to the nearest Apple store, try out the Macs there, talk to the Geniuses about your fears and ask them about your software needs.

Ultimately it's what you are most comfortable and productive with that matters.

I hope you enjoy your Mac experience!
post #7 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the feedback, the windows complaint in dumb but I'm sure I'll get over it. I'm just so use to working with full sized windows. Also, I'm so use the to the start menu and stuff. Anyways, I'm borrowing my friends iBook for a few weeks and I'm gonna use it none stop. Hopefully all the differences will begin to grow on me.
post #8 of 21
I think the main difference in philosophy between Mac and Windows, and the difference that still keeps me on the Mac despite the "advances" in Windows, is this:

Both operating systems are, by necessity, quite complex and powerful, enabling users to carry out involved tasks with a minimum of effort.

Windows (particularly XP) is designed to help you through its complexity. It presents a large, customizable menu (Start) to simplify the process of managing your data and running applications. It employs wizards and helpers (Would you like to email this picture? Would you like to burn this picture to a CD? et al) to relieve you of the donkey work of performing functions that normally require a lot of user input and time.

Windows says to the user, "This is kind of tricky--why don't you let me take care of that for you?"

Mac OS is fundamentally different. Rather than helping the user through complex tasks, the OS strives to make the tasks as simple as possible, so that the OS doesn't have to help. For example, Windows relies on an installer wizard to help you install programs (and discourages you from interfering in the process or moving the file once installed). Mac OS X applications, by contrast, commonly install simply by dragging and dropping a single icon. The process isn't really that simple, of course, but the abstraction does no harm to the user--the app files and libraries are really there, they're just presented in a way that's easier to understand. And if you want to open your Applications folder and look around, the OS will not discourage you--these are your apps, right?

Mac OS X says to the user, "This is simple. Go ahead and try it."
post #9 of 21
For someone used to XP, then obviously XP will seem "easier" to use than OSX.

Conversely, somebody used to OSX would try XP and think "Why do they do that THIS way? I'm used to doing that another way."

Most of the time when you're using a computer, you're on auto-pilot. If you want to resize something or delete something or open something, your hand moves the mouse pointer to the right place without you consciously thinking about it.

But if you try out a new OS, all of a sudden you have to think about what you're doing. "Let's see, if I wanted to install a printer driver, where would I go to do that?" It doesn't mean the new OS isn't as "easy" as the one you were using, it just means you're not accustomed to it yet.

I think that anybody who used XP for 4 hours a day before lunch, and OSX for 4 hours a day after lunch, would soon come to the conclusion that neither one is "easier" than the other. The user might have some preferences about which one is most intuitive, or conducive to work. But it's only after you've become comfortable with an OS and moved into that "auto pilot" mode, that you can compare it to another OS that you're comfortable with.

[ 01-15-2002: Message edited by: sizzle chest ]</p>
post #10 of 21
I actually find the window covering everything to be a little awkward. For instance while using AOL on my sisters IBM one screen fully covers the AOL screen when opening a web page, and when I go to click off the web page sometimes it feels as if I'm going to click off AOL. I much prefer the space at the top be visible to me. If the window doesn't go all the way to the bottom (it should in the Mac, in windows the taskbar is still visible), then you can enlarge the window by grabbing the corner and resizing it manually.

Don't forget, in Windows the bottom still shows, in MacOS the top still shows. This is because Apple put control menus on top and Microsoft put controls on the bottom. You'll get used to it...........
post #11 of 21
I found UNIX easier until I got used to Mac OS.
post #12 of 21
you're in for a few pleasant surprises: here's a few simple tips that may help:

1) mac drives do not have letters. there is no "C" drive. no "A" drive. in the classic mac OS, if a device or drive is available, it appears on the desktop. pop in a zip disk and it'll mount on the desktop. double click it and you're in. mac OSX gives you the option of seeing drives on the desktop or not...so you'll have a choice

2) if you want to move or copy a file simply drag it from where it is to where you want it. just about everything in the OS can be dragged and dropped somewhere else..

3) if you're missing the right mouse button, find the control key. holding control and clicking a file or even the desktop gives you contextual menus..

4) the windows key was the apple key before it was the windows key. it's also called command and it looks like a shamrock. get to know this key.

5) don't be afraid to ask questions and play around with the OS. mac OSX is really alot of fun. if you totally get lost, remember OSX has a help menu that's always available...

give it some time and it'll spoil you rotten.
"Mac users enjoy a love-hate relationship with Microsoft--in which love is defined as "resigned tolerance" and hate as "lava-hot rancor fueled by the fire of a thousand burning suns."

-Macworld
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"Mac users enjoy a love-hate relationship with Microsoft--in which love is defined as "resigned tolerance" and hate as "lava-hot rancor fueled by the fire of a thousand burning suns."

-Macworld
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post #13 of 21
Does no one know this? In OS X, or 9, or 8, or 7, just option-click the resize button and it maximizes to fill the whole screen... everyone bitches but its been there the whole time <img src="graemlins/hmmm.gif" border="0" alt="[Hmmm]" />
post #14 of 21
[quote]Originally posted by janitor:
<strong>Does no one know this? In OS X, or 9, or 8, or 7, just option-click the resize button and it maximizes to fill the whole screen... everyone bitches but its been there the whole time <img src="graemlins/hmmm.gif" border="0" alt="[Hmmm]" /> </strong><hr></blockquote>

mm, nope. Just tried, didn't full screen it. It just went to the width it needs to be. I tried it in IE, Entorage & newsreader and it was the same whether I used option or not when I clicked. <img src="confused.gif" border="0">
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post #15 of 21
My parents computer has XP on it and I have my iMac with OS X. And I find that OS X is a less of a pain in the ass. Every time you wanna do something M$ has put so many of these friggen Wizards in there, I am surprised you don't have a Wizard to shut down the computer. OS X was just made simple and powerful, while M$ just mimics and craps up everything.
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Think Different
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post #16 of 21
Unfortunately my PowerBook has been in the shop for a couple of weeks...and I have been using my Dell with XP for that time...

They say that Windows XP is stable...how the hell come when I go to shutdown it comes up with "Explorer.exe" is not responding...and you have to "end now." What a pain in the ass....but enough of my rantings...

In the full time capacity I've been using OS X...4 months...it never crashed on me...sure I had Explorer randomly "unexpectedly quit"...but that was just once...in XP something has crashed for me once everytime I've used it...it's functionally better than all other iterations of Windows but that's about it...okay, okay, enough of my rantings...

You said you were thinking of getting a Mac...what the hell is taking you so long? Do it dude!
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You think Im an arrogant [expletive] who thinks hes above the law, and I think youre a slime bucket who gets most of his facts wrong. Steve Jobs
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post #17 of 21
[QUOTE]Originally posted by brilhants:
[QB]First of all, I have been a Windows user for years and never owned a Mac. The new Imac has really caught my eye and I'm thinking about making the switch. The only thing holding me back is the OS X... [QB]

This is my first post to one of these forums. I am also (going to be) a first time Mac user. I've used this great site for research and learning and I really believe Mac to be a better computer. I've used PCs for the past 15+ years and I'm fed up with them...the more you use them the deeper your knowledge has to be to get rid of the annoying Windows crap...file errors, blue screen-o-death, etc.
I've also done a lot of reading (primarily here and XLR8 about OSX because it will be the first MAC OS I learn on...so I imagine I will not be annoyed for lack of spring loaded folders. Does anyone think that OSX is a good OS for people like me? I've had to mess around pretty extensively with PCs and NT in my Gov't job so I have a little bit of knowledge...but it usually leads to more frustration.
I'm tired of hating my computer and I have little tolerance and patience for some of the crap the Wintel machines do on a regular basis.
(Nice use of Mac vernacular, eh?



Any suggestions for my new adventure? I'm also logged into the Apple site right now to buy my new G4 Quicksilver (867). Any ideas if I should buy the apple protection plan to cover my 17" Apple flat monitor and other hardware...or is it just another way for apple to make $$? From what I've seen of OSX on the Apple website and quicktime demos it looks pretty kick ass and is way superior to any graphics I've seen through Wintel.

Cheers!
post #18 of 21
WAAIIITTT!!!! HOLD IT RIGHT THERE DAN-O!

sorry bout the all caps, not usually my style.

But:

Don't buy that Quicksilver just yet.

It's about to be upgraded soon, we think. Everyone was surprised that the PowerMac line didn't get an upgrade at MWSF. If you could hold off until at least the end of the month it would probably be a good idea. You'll likely get more Mac for your money.

Check Future Hardware.

Oh, and regarding your other questions -

You'll be fine with OS X. You may experience a little bit of a learning curve. Nothing a quick trip down to Barnes and Noble wouldn't cure, if need be, though.

You probably won't need the Applecare thing, but its your peace of mind. So...

Oh, and nice Mac vernacular.

[ 01-16-2002: Message edited by: seb ]</p>
post #19 of 21
[quote]Originally posted by KidRed:
Now that I think about it, mac is more windows-like then windows is. Windows should instead be called "window" as they only see one window most of the time. [/QB]<hr></blockquote>

HA! You made me laff! Thank you! I like that! Very original and I am gonna use it!

Thanx again!
post #20 of 21
[quote]Originally posted by brilhants:
<strong>First of all, I have been a Windows user for years and never owned a Mac. The new Imac has really caught my eye and I'm thinking about making the switch. The only thing holding me back is the OS X. Everything thing else, itools, iapps, design are to good to pass up. Considering I have been a Windows user for so long, I asked myself, can I handle switching to a new OS? Since I was curious I went down to a computer store and played around with a Mac and OS X. For some reason I didn't find it as easy to use as XP. I love the look of the OS, simply beautiful but I was kinda lost. I just couldn't get into using the OS for some reason. My friend has an iBook and he's gonna let me borrow it so I can have some serious sit down time with. Hopefully it will just take some time cause I really wanna switch. This might sound dumb but in Windows you can fully maximize windows to cover the whole screen. This might sound dumb, but why don't windows in OS X cover the whole screen when you maximize? Anyways, if anyone could share some insight, that would be great.


Thanks</strong><hr></blockquote>
post #21 of 21
Going from one OS to another always involves a period of adjustment, but I would hazard to guess that going from XP to OS X is easier than going from OS X to XP. Nor is it simply a question of ease of navigation. OS X is easier to use in many other ways. To give an example: the windows users in our household and some friends got together to play some games on their PCs. Despite the fact that one of them worked in the field of computers, it took them several hours to network their PCs. If they were Mac users it would have taken them only a few minutes. Later, one of them switched the mouse on one of the computers. That computer was rendered unusable for the rest of the weekend. Later, we tried to set up a DSL network in the house. They had all kinds of trouble with the Windows computers. After plugging in the ethernet cable to my Mac, I started up, switched to ethernet in my network settings, and was immediately on the network and the internet without any trouble. There are so much fewer hassles on Macs that I'm shocked that so many people remain on Windows based PCs. The only possible justification for remaining with Windows is if you have some software program that you must absolutely have that doesn't run on Macs. Otherwise, to remain with Windows is simply to be a masochist.
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