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Analyst: iPhone simply isn't meant for enterprise

post #1 of 102
Thread Starter 
Although many executives are snapping up iPhones and expecting corporate support, there are many reasons the Apple device shouldn't be used in large-scale business, says a new report from Forrester Research.

Providing a list of ten main reasons, analyst Benjamin Gray notes that some of the most familiar complaints remain unresolved at the end of 2007, including a lack of Exchange support for many businesses' enterprise servers and a complete lack of native programs versus thousands for BlackBerries, Palm Treos, and Windows Mobile devices.

But the real issue is a lack of manageability for the iPhone, Gray explains. As there is currently no way to encrypt the data on an iPhone or remotely block access to the information if the handset is lost or stolen, any information on one of these devices can be easily accessible to a thief -- especially as most users are likely to leave their iPhones without a password lock for convenience's sake, the expert says.

Conversely, virtually every major smartphone from other manufacturers allows them fine-grained control, allowing them to set the criteria for a password and even to wipe a phone's memory clear if necessary.

The costs both of buying the phone and maintaining it are also major barriers. The price of Apple's phone is twice that of the BlackBerry Curve and lacks the bulk corporate discount frequently needed to clinch large-scale deals, Gray notes. As most iPhones are locked to a single carrier, this similarly forces businesses to pay for expensive roaming fees rather than switch the phone temporarily to a foreign provider.

The lack of a user-replaceable battery and a tactile-feedback keyboard could also prove inconveniences for an enterprise role.

There are niches that the iPhone can fill even at this early stage, according to the report. While Microsoft's tablet PC concept is often bulky and costly for all but a few industries, the iPhone's relatively low price and small size may make it ideal for these tasks. Field workers who need access to some remote information or directions through Google Maps may also appreciate the purchase.

Apple's debut cellphone is likely to improve over time, including third-party app support in February, Gray is careful to mention. But in its primary form, the iPhone is running contrary to the direction of most offices, which are looking to slim down -- not expand -- their choice of mobile equipment.

"The current enterprise model is broken," the Forrester analyst says. "IT organizations have been stretched to support whatever platforms their employees have brought into the company. But with a diverse selection of mobile platforms including BlackBerry, Linux, Palm OS, Symbian, Windows CE, Windows Mobile, and now Mac OS X IT cant be expected to support each and every operating system."
post #2 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

"The current enterprise model is broken," the Forrester analyst says. "IT organizations have been stretched to support whatever platforms their employees have brought into the company. But with a diverse selection of mobile platforms — including BlackBerry, Linux, Palm OS, Symbian, Windows CE, Windows Mobile, and now Mac OS X — IT can’t be expected to support each and every operating system."

The whole article was obvious but this last quote is actually worth mentioning. We really need standards in the enterprise. While Exchange is needed for the iPhone to capture the smartphone marketshare that Apple wants it's a Catch 22 as Apple supporting Exchange seems to be insuring Exchange's future survival.
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post #3 of 102
If you are stupid enough to walk around without your 4 digit pass code on, you deserve to lose your phone and data. First thing i did was lock my phone with a pass code , and my daughter's and my wife's phone ,..,DUH. .,,.
post #4 of 102
"The current enterprise model is broken," the Forrester analyst says. "IT organizations have been stretched to support whatever platforms their employees have brought into the company. But with a diverse selection of mobile platforms — including BlackBerry, Linux, Palm OS, Symbian, Windows CE, Windows Mobile, and now Mac OS X — IT can’t be expected to support each and every operating system."

Of course IT should support each and every operating system! It does now, what is one more to the list? That IS their job you know. Information Technology- make it work. That is what has gotten so many businesses in trouble- relying on just one technology provider -Microsoft!
post #5 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by drjjones View Post

If you are stupid enough to walk around without your password on you deserve to lose your phone and data. First thing i did was lock my phone with a password , and my daughter's and my wife's phone ,..,DUH. .,,.

I do wish the iPhone allowed me to chose a pin or a password. I would like to have this option for added security. As well as, a way to purge my iPhone's personal information remotely.
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post #6 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I do wish the iPhone allowed me to chose a pin or a password. I would like to have this option for added security.

Are you talking about the 4-digit passcode lock?
post #7 of 102
iPhone has a password, but I doubt that would stop a proficient hacker, once the thief has found one or taught themselves, from connecting it to a computer and accessing the DATA on the phone.
post #8 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by windsurfer_nyc View Post

Are you talking about the 4-digit passcode lock?

I'm talking about an option to use a proper password instead. Having the keyboard appear that allows me to put in a password as long as I desire. A 4-digit pin is only 10,000 possible combinations while even a 4 character password using alphanumerics and special characters can be in the millions.
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post #9 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhotoMacUser View Post

Of course IT should support each and every operating system! It does now, what is one more to the list? That IS their job you know. Information Technology- make it work.

I think that's incredibly short-sighted and unrealistic. You're basically expecting one department to make everything work together despite the fact that the device makers have chosen not to cooperate. It's not just Microsoft either, every device has its own proprietary thing that causes problems. Every demand has a cost, and as it is, they seem to demand everything but don't want to pay the bill in the end.
post #10 of 102
The iPhone isn't expensive, it's free, because its unlimited data plan is half the price (or better) of all other data devices sold by AT&T and Verizon. Only $20/month instead of $40 or more per month, plus taxes.
post #11 of 102
Again, i do not think Apple want those markets because when you enter that market it become more about what some corporate IT person think is the right feature on the phone verse having a product that really works. Trust me the cell phone, PDA, and smart phone companies become a slave to these people/companies who usually have no clue and many time requirements from the various company conflict with each other. Because of this you all end up with something that kind of works.

For all those interesting in having an iPhone you should be happy it is not an enterprise product because you will end up with something better in the end.
post #12 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foo2 View Post

The iPhone isn't expensive, it's free, because its unlimited data plan is half the price (or better) of all other data devices sold by AT&T and Verizon. Only $20/month instead of $40 or more per month, plus taxes.

I agree, this is something that people do not realize about the phone especial if you do not have data plan with AT&T right now, wife has an Treo now, and will be getting an iPhone, turns out her data plan which is paid by her company is $40.00 a month will be $20.00 a month with a iPhone, because of this saving her boss agree to pay for the iphone because the pay backing is little over a year.
post #13 of 102
I don't know why folks make life so hard for themselves. After having every smart phone for the last 10 years the only thing that was consistent is the fact that they sucked. The iPhone is the worlds first functional hand held computer with an integrated cell phone. Given the physical constraints of the form factor Apple had to ditch the keyboard centric model for a new idea all together. The UI is a breakthrough that will not be fully appreciated by IT for a decade. I think that enterprises that don't embrace it do so at their own peril.
post #14 of 102
Rant/

Good Lord!!! Is this Forrester Research dump on Apple Week or what? First it was McQuivey and now this? Seriously, read between the lines here - FUD - likely funded by MS interests. Good Lord!

/End Rant

Seriously gang - this is really bizarre. Of COURSE the iPhone does not support Exchange. Exchange is a CLOSED system - not an OPEN standard. Hello?? Anybody home at Forrester?? Why not write a piece about MS Exchange not supporting the iPhone. Or MS not using open software? What is REALLY holding up innovation and interoperability? Or should I say WHO?

Really, this crap is getting old fast...


Tis the Season!

Stu
post #15 of 102
sorry for that, but i am really tired from stupid (sorry) apple fanboiz. Everytime anyone - ANYONE - says anything bad - even only a little bit - about apple and its products, and they are there, shouting. For examle, analysts write serious analysis about why he thinks iPhone cannot be used in enterprise. And immediately, he is punched in the face by apple fanboiz, shouting "OMG thiz iz windoze fud LOL my iphone is super you got to like it windoze is shit LOL." I mean - seriously, did you ever though about your mental illness?
and we'll all float on OK
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post #16 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

It's not just Microsoft either, every device has its own proprietary thing that causes problems.

Um, not Apple - they are using mostly open standards on the iPhone - like um, IMAP. Shall I go on??

After a third reading, I must say IMHO, this article is completely FUD. Obviously, the recent stats on the iPhone topping the mobile web browsing stats has them running scared. I would almost guarantee this is where this "research" is targeted....

Blah

Stu
post #17 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I think that's incredibly short-sighted and unrealistic. You're basically expecting one department to make everything work together despite the fact that the device makers have chosen not to cooperate. It's not just Microsoft either, every device has its own proprietary thing that causes problems. Every demand has a cost, and as it is, they seem to demand everything but don't want to pay the bill in the end.

Quote:
Originally Posted by running View Post

sorry for that, but i am really tired from stupid (sorry) apple fanboiz. Everytime anyone - ANYONE - says anything bad - even only a little bit - about apple and its products, and they are there, shouting. For examle, analysts write serious analysis about why he thinks iPhone cannot be used in enterprise. And immediately, he is punched in the face by apple fanboiz, shouting "OMG thiz iz windoze fud LOL my iphone is super you got to like it windoze is shit LOL." I mean - seriously, did you ever though about your mental illness?

*Plunk*

Oh and about your bad english - try not using the letter Z so much...
post #18 of 102
Dude if your iphone is protected by a passcode theres no way in hell anyone can access it, they might be able to wipe the entire drive trying, but not access it. is not impossible but you will have to take the freaking thing apart, also remember after you try 5x iphone becomes disable for 1 minute and then you try 1 more time and its disable for 5 minutes another try will set you at 15 mitunes and so on, when the unit is in disable mode you can't even jailbreak it, the only option is a hard rest that will wipe everything.
post #19 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by stuhowe View Post

Um, not Apple - they are using mostly open standards on the iPhone - like um, IMAP. Shall I go on??

How open is the calendar management? Can you tie together the calendars of many different people, see what your coworkers are scheduled to do?

iPhone doesn't handle the more advanced WiFi authentication systems used in corporate environments.
post #20 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by stuhowe View Post

Is this Forrester Research dump on Apple Week or what?

My thoughts exactly.
post #21 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

How open is the calendar management? Can you tie together the calendars of many different people, see what your coworkers are scheduled to do?

iPhone doesn't handle the more advanced WiFi authentication systems used in corporate environments.

Re calendars - yes. With Leopard you're now using the caldav/ical open standard. There is an open source (from Apple) calendar server that can be installed on a server. I comes with Leopard server as well. So iPhone syncs with Desktop calendar which is served by the open-source server.
post #22 of 102
I had to laugh at the notion that IT should control the direction of a company's technology use. I work in education technology and it is a constant argument about who should be making the decisions. I say use what you like, break it, and let IT have the job security of having to fix it I might make the IT people mad, but education and business should be about vision, not about limits. We have administrators flocking to the iPhone because they LIKE it. I think the analysts report fails to understand that market forces will dictate what is used, and not what any of the rest of us think.

IT has a tough job, and I understand why they want to protect things and make their jobs easier, but if I never stepped outside the box they sometimes try to keep me in, I would never innovate.

Some administrators will follow IT recommendations to a T, but while IT should certainly have input in big tech decisions, they will never beat out the "cool" factor of something like the iPhone, or the next big thing. If the boss wants to use his or her iPhone, you are going to have to learn to support it, and the market will follow.

I support technology freedom!
post #23 of 102


Forrester Research = Funded by Microsoft.

Quote:
A recent report, for example, found that Red Hat Linux had fewer critical flaws than Microsoft Windows. Another research paper, conducted by Forrester Research and sponsored by Microsoft, unsurprisingly favoured Windows.

http://articles.techrepublic.com.com...1-5490241.html


post #24 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by running View Post

sorry for that, but i am really tired from stupid (sorry) apple fanboiz. Everytime anyone - ANYONE - says anything bad - even only a little bit - about apple and its products, and they are there, shouting. For examle, analysts write serious analysis about why he thinks iPhone cannot be used in enterprise. And immediately, he is punched in the face by apple fanboiz, shouting "OMG thiz iz windoze fud LOL my iphone is super you got to like it windoze is shit LOL." I mean - seriously, did you ever though about your mental illness?

running, the name of this site should tip you off about how some posters here are likely to react to a story such as this.

Be that as it may, you know what I am really tired of? The truly lazy-, bored-, illiterate-sounding word "fanboy" (and its variants) that simply makes the user sound like (s)he is lazy, bored, and illiterate.
post #25 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

running, the name of this site should tip you off about how some posters here are likely to react to a story such as this.

Be that as it may, you know what I am really tired of? The truly lazy-, bored-, illiterate-sounding word "fanboy" (and its variants) that simply makes the user sound like (s)he is lazy, bored, and illiterate.

Well exactly. Reminds me of the age old political ploy - make fun of something to discredit it. Up here in Canada a bunch of years ago, the Alberta Premier (similar to a State Governor for you all in the USA) used to say K - EYE - OH - ToE when referring to the Kyoto Protocol. Simple - make it sound stupid, make it sound funny - the unthinking masses don't take it seriously.

so, whenever I see anyone refer this 40 year old (me) as a Fanboy or associated with the text messaging type spelling using the Z - I think the same thing. More FUD. Make fun of anyone not drinking the Kool-Aid and you discredit them.

Sadly though - in this case - most of us lurking about here are FAR too smart to fall for that. I wonder who Forrester Research caters to?

Stu
post #26 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

How open is the calendar management? Can you tie together the calendars of many different people, see what your coworkers are scheduled to do?

iPhone doesn't handle the more advanced WiFi authentication systems used in corporate environments.

Um - calendars - yes..!

WPA - or WEP - um, what's more sophisticated?
post #27 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by stuhowe View Post

WPA - or WEP - um, what's more sophisticated?

It's more complicated than that. There are at least six variations on WPA.

Actually, in specific, iPhone (and iTouch) doesn't support 802.1x.
post #28 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by running View Post

sorry for that, but i am really tired from stupid (sorry) apple fanboiz. Everytime anyone - ANYONE - says anything bad - even only a little bit - about apple and its products, and they are there, shouting. For examle, analysts write serious analysis about why he thinks iPhone cannot be used in enterprise. And immediately, he is punched in the face by apple fanboiz, shouting "OMG thiz iz windoze fud LOL my iphone is super you got to like it windoze is shit LOL." I mean - seriously, did you ever though about your mental illness?

I have to say I'm with this guy- trust me there is no vast conspiracy against Apple by Microsoft or anyone. Apple isn't perfect and not everything Apple does is God. If someone wrote an article bashing something cool by Microsoft you would be all over it trying to spin it along as truth.
post #29 of 102
...the iPhone actually works. A great web browser, precise rendering of HTML e-mail, etc. etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Foo2 View Post

The iPhone isn't expensive, it's free, because its unlimited data plan is half the price (or better) of all other data devices sold by AT&T and Verizon. Only $20/month instead of $40 or more per month, plus taxes.
post #30 of 102
The author says that the iPhone user won't use the security pass-code due to the lack of convenience. Yet he doesn't use the same reasoning with the users of other smart phones. Lets face it, most people don't secure their data adequately if at all. Secondly, why would you put valuable info on a phone to begin with. You have to figure the odds of losing it are too great. The chances of someone with any know how and desire, can break any security measures.

THe author also uses the tired argument of not being able to replace the battery. I cannot recall ever needing to replace a phone battery before wanting to upgrade the phone anyway.

It just sounds like the same old Apple bashing we have been hearing for years. It is regurgitated crap from haters.

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post #31 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by tuneman07 View Post

I have to say I'm with this guy- trust me there is no vast conspiracy against Apple by Microsoft or anyone. Apple isn't perfect and not everything Apple does is God. If someone wrote an article bashing something cool by Microsoft you would be all over it trying to spin it along as truth.

No I (we) wouldn't. That's the difference.
post #32 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by tuneman07 View Post

If someone wrote an article bashing something cool by Microsoft you would be all over it trying to spin it along as truth.

That's a pretty big IF. It just doesn't happen (something cool from Microsoft), so I'm not sure where you're coming from.

BTW: Just as there's no vast conspiracy against Apple, there's no vast conspiracy of Apple fanboyism either. Just a lot of interest in the competition from both sides of the issue and many more people with their retirement savings invested in MSFT, NOK, MOT, VZ, RIMM, etc. than in AAPL. Perhaps in the next year or so that will change.
post #33 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by stuhowe View Post

More FUD. Make fun of anyone not drinking the Kool-Aid and you discredit them.
Sadly though - in this case - most of us lurking about here are FAR too smart to fall for that. I wonder who Forrester Research caters to?
-Stu

Aren't you the same person that wrote the post quoted below? If that's the case, how in the HELL can you claim to not be "drinking the kool-aid"? In addition, you are 40 years old? My god.. I was hoping to blame the laughable "its a conspiracy" post on the
naivety of adolescence.


Quote:
... Is this Forrester Research dump on Apple Week or what? First it was McQuivey and now this? Seriously, read between the lines here - FUD - likely funded by MS interests. Good Lord!

... Seriously gang - this is really bizarre. Of COURSE the iPhone does not support Exchange. Exchange is a CLOSED system - not an OPEN standard. Hello?? Anybody home at Forrester?? Why not write a piece about MS Exchange not supporting the iPhone. Or MS not using open software? What is REALLY holding up innovation and interoperability? Or should I say WHO?...
- Stu
post #34 of 102
My favorite quote from the article:

"As there is currently no way to encrypt the data on an iPhone or remotely block access to the information if the handset is lost or stolen, any information on one of these devices can be easily accessible to a thief"

No kidding a thief is going to be able to access the contents of the phone (if not password protected). If I stole a voyager, a Palm Pilot, a Treo, any Blackberry, I would STILL be able to access the contents of the phone and forward them onto myself within minutes! How does this apply ONLY to the iPhone and not EVERY other phone in the world that is not password protected by the owner?
post #35 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

with a diverse selection of mobile platforms including BlackBerry, Linux, Palm OS, Symbian, Windows CE, Windows Mobile, and now Mac OS X IT cant be expected to support each and every operating system.

I say standardize on Mac OS X. You know, keep it simple for IT.
post #36 of 102
What is needed is a handheld (or so; small) device running the full and complete Mac OS X 10.5.x and with no limitations. Call it iPhone, iPod touch or iPalm. Full support for NATIVE Keynote and PowerPoint presentations. The ultimate presentation remote, both wired and wireless. We want thousands, and we want them now! Screen? 6-inch or so should be just perfect.
post #37 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by stuhowe View Post

Um - calendars - yes..!

WPA - or WEP - um, what's more sophisticated?

It doesn't support 802.1X which is a common authentication method for corporate and University WiFi systems.

the lack of 802.1X support (which 10.5 and 10.4 support) I'm getting one for work after Mac World expo.
post #38 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

"The current enterprise model is broken," the Forrester analyst says. "IT organizations have been stretched to support whatever platforms their employees have brought into the company. But with a diverse selection of mobile platforms including BlackBerry, Linux, Palm OS, Symbian, Windows CE, Windows Mobile, and now Mac OS X IT cant be expected to support each and every operating system."

This would not be a problem if, instead of using the proprietary Exchange system, they used an open email and calendaring standard (and any open standard instead of a proprietary one). In this last case, supporting any OS would be a breeze.

But instead they chose a closed Microsoft solution (although "closed" and "Microsoft" may seem a pleonasm, "Microsoft" and "solution" do appear to be an oxymoron), and now they are complaining that it is hard to support other OSes ??? How hard is that to understand !
post #39 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by winterspan View Post

Aren't you the same person that wrote the post quoted below? If that's the case, how in the HELL can you claim to not be "drinking the kool-aid"? In addition, you are 40 years old? My god.. I was hoping to blame the laughable "its a conspiracy" post on the
naivety of adolescence.

Yep - I am the same guy.

And at my old age I am smart enough to A) Not drink anyone's Kool Aid and B) Read between the lines when something is called "research" and published for the world to read.

In the case of B, I usually ask myself - who did this research? What is their expertise on the subject? Are they impartial and/or reputable? And most importantly - where do they get their funding? Who sponsored the research and did the sponsor have any agenda in doing so?

I think Forrester, in particular, has an easily researched (pardon the pun) track record and an example has already been posted above regarding Linux.

Nothing more to say on this - just would ask things be kept civil.
post #40 of 102
We needed an Analyst to tell us this? Apple had stated at the release that this is NOT intended to be an enterprise solution.

People do find a way, and once the platform is opened up, you will see that change.
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