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New report claims 24-hour, variable price iTunes rentals - Page 3

post #81 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedalmatian View Post

I do for the simple rerason DVDs are a pain in the arse, you get the slightest mark on them, which its impossible not to and they refuse to work and the picture quality is no different to VHS, despite all the signing and dancing adverts when they first came out.

What? Maybe if you're recording your own videos from TV, then SVHS might be close, but if you think that the picture quality is comparable between DVD and regular VHS, then something is seriously wrong. Even on an RF connector to a 20" SDTV, DVD is better, but if you're passing it through a VCR, then Macrovision might cause some problems.

DVDs don't damage that easily such that they're unplayable, nor is it difficult to handle them in a way that doesn't scratch them. Almost none of my DVDs have any scratches. I do occasionally have problems with rental discs, maybe 1 in 50, and usually it's a matter of wiping the fingerprints of the knuckle draggers that touch the data side when handling the DVD.
post #82 of 87
for my family i'd rather have a mobile device that can plug into a screen in my car rather than carry a bunch of scratch prone discs. vhs tapes are far more durable than dvd with kids, sure they can pull out a tape maybe. but scratches and marks are very difficult to fix. i've had many more failures with dvd than vhs. when video stores first had dvd they had extra repair charges. the worker said they had a lower shelf play life than vhs.
so if i could hold say 20-30 video's that would be great. so how many itunes video's can fit on 8 gb iphone. or ipod it would be cool to have the nano hold my video then it would be cheaper to mount (thinner too) a screen in my car
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post #83 of 87
So last night I rented my first film from the xBox Live Marketplace; it was Ratatouille, and we rented it because we don't have a Blu-Ray player and renting it on the xBox is the only other way to enjoy the film in high definition. The cost was about $6, which is only a dollar more than what Blockbuster charges for a rental. The quality was 720p picture, 5.1 surround sound, and it looked and sounded great. I was more impressed with the sound than the picture, but while the picture was a little soft on details compared to a 1080p HD DVD, there were no compression artifacts or anything of that nature. The movie allowed us to begin playing just as soon as enough was downloaded that it could play without interruption (19%). The file size was 5GB.

I would expect Apple to at least match Microsoft in terms of picture and sound quality; the only real hurdle with the xBox is that you can't purchase directly with money; you have to first purchase "points", which can then be put toward marketplace purchases. That and the mediocre movie selection is really the only downside to the xBox's rental system. If Apple wants their service to become people's default means of watching movies, the selection needs to be vast and the quality needs to be 720p with 5.1 surround sound. Otherwise, it's just going to be movie rentals for iPod users, and that's not very exciting.


Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedalmatian View Post

...and the picture quality is no different to VHS, despite all the signing and dancing adverts when they first came out.

There's either something seriously wrong with your eyes, the way you're hooking up your DVD player, your television, or all of the above. The quality difference between VHS and DVD is night and day, so long as your television is bigger than 19" and you're hooking up your DVD player properly (i.e. not with RCA, S-Video, or an RF connector). And as others have said, every time you play a VHS tape the quality degrades; hell, if it's just sitting in a box the quality is degrading.
post #84 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post

SIf Apple wants their service to become people's default means of watching movies, the selection needs to be vast and the quality needs to be 720p with 5.1 surround sound.

OK, but remember that there aren't many existing HD movies out there now. Look at Netflix, which has maybe 500 HD movies, and 100,000 standard DVDs. New releases, which are the bread and butter of rental services, are more likely to be HD of course. But no one should expect all or even more than a small fraction of available movies to be HD.

It's also interesting that download rental services sidestep the format wars. There are no Bluray or HD-DVD downloads. Perhaps with everyone dicking around with the formats, download services like iTunes could come in and take the day.
post #85 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by BRussell View Post

OK, but remember that there aren't many existing HD movies out there now. Look at Netflix, which has maybe 500 HD movies, and 100,000 standard DVDs. New releases, which are the bread and butter of rental services, are more likely to be HD of course. But no one should expect all or even more than a small fraction of available movies to be HD.

We don't expect HD but at least DVD quality or above - no more "near DVD quality" as what is currently the iTunes movie quality. iPod quality movie rentals will fail big time.
post #86 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by BRussell View Post

OK, but remember that there aren't many existing HD movies out there now. Look at Netflix, which has maybe 500 HD movies, and 100,000 standard DVDs. New releases, which are the bread and butter of rental services, are more likely to be HD of course. But no one should expect all or even more than a small fraction of available movies to be HD.

Good point. How about DVD quality and 5.1 surround sound as a standard, plus an option for 720p for those films which the studio has an HD master of, i.e. new films and catalog titles that have been released on HD DVD or Blu-Ray?
post #87 of 87
I have a Vudu box and the 24 hour period starts counting down once you start watching the movie. It also gives you a limited time to start watching the movie. When I pick a rental to watch, it gives me 30 days. The 24 hour period might be part of partial understanding of the rumor. I highly doubt Apple would force anyone to watch right away.
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