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Apple's new MacBook Air dubbed world’s thinnest notebook - Page 6

post #201 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

This is a serious yawner. They should have rolled the MBA out quietly last week, and used the keynote to unveil the new Mac Pro. At least that would have been interesting.

I mean, what was the objective here? Lets make the most under powered, least featured notebook we possibly can, then charge a massive premium for it just because it's thinner. A smaller footprint would be marginally impressive, but only a simpleton is impressed by "thin".

What is difficult to accept is the perception that there are other choices, and a lot of them at that.

That the Dells, Sonys, HPs, etc., offer or have already made available, computers, i.e., laptops and desktops, that far exceed the innovative offerings of Apple, and significantly cheaper. And that they do so quite frequently.

Perhaps I am missing something. Give us an example of who else has addressed your needs.

But you are right in that, "only a simpleton is impressed by "thin"." Except that it takes a genius to understands what is inside and appreciates how the heck it ever got there.
post #202 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

This is a serious yawner. They should have rolled the MBA out quietly last week, and used the keynote to unveil the new Mac Pro. At least that would have been interesting.

I mean, what was the objective here? Lets make the most under powered, least featured notebook we possibly can, then charge a massive premium for it just because it's thinner. A smaller footprint would be marginally impressive, but only a simpleton is impressed by "thin".

You're not looking at the marketplace. This is by no means underpowered for its class, quite the opposite. Same for the price, though I had wished it to be a bit lower.

Apple really did put some serious work into this, with some high technologies.

It's worth the price.

That doesn't mean that it's worth it to you, but that's another story.
post #203 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by oilburner View Post

Well, I have to say I am a bit disappointed.

I am one of "those" people getting ready to switch back to Mac after a 10 yr absence, and have been anticipating today like Christmas! I have used subnotebooks for years. I think the MBA design is gorgeous, and as a sales rep, I do not need high-end power for video/photography, but I need a big enough screen for spreadsheets, SFA websites, reviewing marketing plans and .ppt slides. I want light and compact size due to the ever-constricting airline seats. The MBA form-factor and weight really appeal to me.

BUT: I *always* travel with 2 batteries. I need at least 100gb of space for growth (currently using 85). Built in Ethernet is useful but I can probably make do with the USB dongle. Ethernet is still needed as some hotels do not have wifi and I have to connect to their broadband with Ethernet.

Apple was SO CLOSE here!!!!! You can tell by the size of the screen bezel that they have enough room for a 15" screen. And no matte screen option? They could have kept Ethernet. The HDD options should have gone at least to the 160 GB ipod drive. All of those additions would have affected the thickness by .2" or so, but they would have been worth it for the way most of us work.

As for competition - these are some previous laptops that are small and one is lighter, and without compromise on functionality:

Toshiba R200 - less than 1" thick, 2 USB, SD, VGA, PCMCIA, internal modem, Ethernet wireless b/g. Weight = 2.74lbs. Battery life, approx 3.5 hrs

Panasonic CF-W2 (now the W4 or 5) - CD R/W, 2 USB, wireless b/g, SD, PCMCIA, VGA, EThernet, built in modem, armored HD, 12.1" screen, mono, 2.6 lbs

My current Panasonic CF-Y4 - DVD R/W, (2) USB, wireless b/g, SD, PCMCIA, VGA, Ethernet, built in modem, *armored HD* (tested up to a 4 ft. fall). 14" screen, stereo, and 3.4 lbs.

I'm not starting a flame-war, I *want* a Mac, but I'm looking at my 3 year old Panasonic that still has 15gb of HDD left, a larger screen, built in drive, ethernet, SD, PCMCIA and is only .4lbs heavier! I just dont think I can justify the 1800 to go backwards. Maybe rev.2 or by the WWDC Apple will have some more compelling options for the MBA????

You haven't given enough specs for any of those machines to be able to determine just what they actually are.
post #204 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by wilco View Post

Pot, meet Kettle.


Ah, NOW Wilco's back.
post #205 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Ah, NOW Wilco's back.

I may have mentioned this before, but I have grown accustomed to his crazy-aunt-in-the-cellar quality. (And does he ever post without an eye-roll?)

It does break it up a bit......
post #206 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

I may have mentioned this before, but I have grown accustomed to his crazy-aunt-in-the-cellar quality. (And does he ever post without an eye-roll?)

It does break it up a bit......

Yeah. I suppose it just pays to sigh, and move on.
post #207 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave K. View Post

A couple of points that nobody else brought up.

1. Why does the MBA only come with Mac OS X 10.5 and iLife 08'. It doesn't come with any other software. No OmniOutliner, no Quicken, no nothing (I also notice that the MB and MBP pages on Apple.com also list no other software on those notebooks either). Is this a new trend...

2. Why doesn't Apple include a Front Row remote? $19 for that piece of junk isn't worth it....

3. Shouldn't the Ethernet to USB hub be included in a $1800+ notebook?

Dave

1) I never knew that Macs came with Quicken!?

2) Good question (if true).

3) No, given all else that the MBA comes with. (I recommend you watch the video on apple.com, if you have not done so already).
post #208 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Yeah. I suppose it just pays to sigh, and move on.

Or, and move on!
post #209 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I'm glad. I've collected way to many Apple remotes over the last two years. I nearly have a enough to play Mah Jong with.

Dumb question: Do the remotes work across machines?
post #210 of 400
The problem here is that if Apple kept adding all of these little cost (though to some people here, even $19 seems to be a lot) items to the box, they would add up to a not so little cost. Then Apple would have to raise the price by that amount.

When that happens, we always have some people here say that they don't need the remote, have no Ethernet, don't use Quicken, etc.

They then complain that Apple HAS included them, and would Apple please leave them out so just the people who wanted them would have to pay for them.

Duh! Which way did he go?
post #211 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

..... but only a simpleton is impressed by "thin".

I am truly impressed that you appreciate "fat." That's great.

(No offense intended to anyone who is not thin).
post #212 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

You haven't given enough specs for any of those machines to be able to determine just what they actually are.

melgross,

Good point. The reason I didnt is that these are all previous machines, going back as much as 6 years. They were in the same "state of the art" realm that the MBA is today in that they used less power-consuming versions of the chipsets that were out in that day. For example, my 3 year-old CF-Y4 uses a 1.6 ghz centrino with 1 gb of RAM.

I wasnt having a horsepower war, the point is that there are many other companies making very elegant, light, fast, battery-frugal designs out there. Apple takes that to another level for sure, the MBA is GORGEOUS! But honestly - that bezel around the screen? It actually looks like a 10 year old laptop screen. And thin is great, but I think for many of us that travel and need/use light weight, I'd sacrifice a 1/2 inch of depth for features that I use on the road.

People here keep saying that these type machines are used by road warriors/execs and that is true from personal experience. But at some point the light weight/thinness that you built the device for comes with so many compromises that I end up lugging around a bunch of ancillary things just to get by.

For the record, the current model of my Panasonic, the Y7 has the 1.8 core2duo, 2gb ram, 160gb HDD, 8 hour stated (probably 5 hour real, mine is) battery life, 14.1" screen, and 3.3 lbs. Again - I am not bashing the Air, just pointing out that others are meeting similar benchmarks with more features for same/less money..
post #213 of 400
I think that the things Apple introduced are truly great products except for the continued crippled iPhone but I know it's not easy developing a product that is all things to everyone. But my biggest disappointment is the lack of a tablet mac. The airMac would have made a truly great tablet and would have set the industry on fire. All you read is how they (tablets) just haven't taken off and there isn't a huge market for them. I think that Apple can define the field. Look at what's there in the tablet market, cumbersome, heavy, Windows oriented tablet computers which are not a lot better than sitting down in front of a regular laptop. A airMac tablet that can be attached to a large desktop screen and a blue tooth keyboard would be magic. It could be used as a media center in a car, GPS mapping device in a car and backup in an airplane, classroom note taking, networked in healthcare settings and many more uses. It would define the portable computer market for years to come.
post #214 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by oilburner View Post

Toshiba R200 - less than 1" thick, 2 USB, SD, VGA, PCMCIA, internal modem, Ethernet wireless b/g. Weight = 2.74lbs. Battery life, approx 3.5 hrs

Panasonic CF-W2 (now the W4 or 5) - CD R/W, 2 USB, wireless b/g, SD, PCMCIA, VGA, EThernet, built in modem, armored HD, 12.1" screen, mono, 2.6 lbs

My current Panasonic CF-Y4 - DVD R/W, (2) USB, wireless b/g, SD, PCMCIA, VGA, Ethernet, built in modem, *armored HD* (tested up to a 4 ft. fall). 14" screen, stereo, and 3.4 lbs.

Except, you don't mention that the Toshiba retails for about $2100, and the Panasonic CF-Y4 for $2000. I don't know what the "CF-W2" sells for (how the heck do they come up with these names!?).

Since you have all these wonderful alternatives, what the heck are you complaining about?
post #215 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by oilburner View Post

melgross,

Good point. The reason I didnt is that these are all previous machines, going back as much as 6 years. They were in the same "state of the art" realm that the MBA is today in that they used less power-consuming versions of the chipsets that were out in that day. For example, my 3 year-old CF-Y4 uses a 1.6 ghz centrino with 1 gb of RAM.

I wasnt having a horsepower war, the point is that there are many other companies making very elegant, light, fast, battery-frugal designs out there. Apple takes that to another level for sure, the MBA is GORGEOUS! But honestly - that bezel around the screen? It actually looks like a 10 year old laptop screen. And thin is great, but I think for many of us that travel and need/use light weight, I'd sacrifice a 1/2 inch of depth for features that I use on the road.

People here keep saying that these type machines are used by road warriors/execs and that is true from personal experience. But at some point the light weight/thinness that you built the device for comes with so many compromises that I end up lugging around a bunch of ancillary things just to get by.

For the record, the current model of my Panasonic, the Y7 has the 1.8 core2duo, 2gb ram, 160gb HDD, 8 hour stated (probably 5 hour real, mine is) battery life, 14.1" screen, and 3.3 lbs. Again - I am not bashing the Air, just pointing out that others are meeting similar benchmarks with more features for same/less money..

I'm not so sure you're right.

There are cheaper machines with features, and more expensive machines with features. You can always pull the cheaper ones for comparison, while leaving out the more expensive ones, which is what you've done.

If you don't consider the features that Apple has put in, and only the ones the others have put in then it's not a fair comparison.

If you say that Apple's features are not important to you, but the others are, then you are not stating which machine has more value, just which machine has more value for YOU.

If a cheap plastic case is a better feature then the aluminum die castings Apple is using, then that's one for the cheaper model.

If the LED backlighting (and much better color) is not important, then Apple loses again.

If you don't care for the very large multi-touch trackpad, scratch another one from Apple.

We can go down the entire feature list that way.

We can also go the other way. Would I need a built-in DVD combo drive? No. Useless to me, etc.

Where do we start.

Try looking at the better machines on the market, and you will find them to be as expensive as this, or more expensive, and some have even less to offer.
post #216 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

The problem here is that if Apple kept adding all of these little cost (though to some people here, even $19 seems to be a lot) items to the box, they would add up to a not so little cost. Then Apple would have to raise the price by that amount.

When that happens, we always have some people here say that they don't need the remote, have no Ethernet, don't use Quicken, etc.

They then complain that Apple HAS included them, and would Apple please leave them out so just the people who wanted them would have to pay for them.

Duh! Which way did he go?

True enough. So lets compromise on a few general truisms:

1. HD size - not everyone needs 160 gb, but many of us do. You have a drive that size, let me have an option to put it in, and I'll accept the loss of 15 minutes of battery life.

2. battery - road warriors always like to have an extra battery. Heck, with an old Dell, I would take 4 of them for pan-Asian trips, just to have enough safe margin for the plane trip. Also - maybe this is more of a Windows problem but sometimes it is needed to pull the battery as that is the only way to ultimately "kill" the laptop in order to reset it if you are having problems. I dont know if OSX has any of those kind of situations, but to not be able to pull a battery seems a bit...weird.

3. connectivity - I can probably handle an Ethernet dongle, but what about EVDO card options?


Somewhere in the middle between "I want everything for 2.5 lbs and 10 hrs battery life" and " it is so cool, but it doesnt do anything". If the device was truly created for those that travel and use it as a 2nd device, then those needs are not too much to ask. I see from your last comment that you accuse me of comparing this need to that. I am not doing a feature-to-feature copmarison. I am saying that other makers have created competitive machines with similar specs and more features for the same weight and similar money. THAT is a fact.

The point of ports is that they are cheap to put in and give people the option of expandibility at very little relative cost for the machine. If thin was the compromise to utility and lower cost, I'd take slightly thicker and more useful. And I believe a larger percentage of the general public would, too. I have not heard too much general sentiment that laptops were too "thick".
post #217 of 400
$1,000 more than it ought to be for what's inside. Like the cube, this product belongs below the consumer line, not between the consumer and pro line. Less shouldn't cost more.
post #218 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by oilburner View Post

True enough. So lets compromise on a few general truisms:

1. HD size - not everyone needs 160 gb, but many of us do. You have a drive that size, let me have an option to put it in, and I'll accept the loss of 15 minutes of battery life.

2. battery - road warriors always like to have an extra battery. Heck, with an old Dell, I would take 4 of them for pan-Asian trips, just to have enough safe margin for the plane trip. Also - maybe this is more of a Windows problem

3. connectivity - I can probably handle an Ethernet dongle, but what about EVDO card options?


Somewhere in the middle between "I want everything for 2.5 lbs and 10 hrs battery life" and " it is so cool, but it doesnt do anything". If the device was truly created for those that travel and use it as a 2nd device, then those needs are not too much to ask...

This machine IS between the 10 hour life and doesn't do anything.

This machine isn't for everyone. Surprise!

No machine is for everyone. That's a surprise too, right?

What card options would you want, other than perhaps Firewire, or maybe eSATA?

It already has most everything else built-in.
post #219 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by trboyden View Post

Yep, there's your next Dell, HP, and anyone else that uses Intel's spec platforms.

<rant>

The MacBook Air will die just like the other niche products Apple's produced in the past (Cube, Newton, etc...) there is just not a market for a mid-ranged stripped down product. This is not the small mobile product to jump start the Japanese market and it's definately not a "Pro" model with a 1.8" hard drive. That puppy just isn't going to take the abuse that a daily computing load will put on it. Throw in any significant graphics/video work and it will probably die in about a year. I only get about a 1 1/2 - 2 years out of my notebook hard drives in my other Mac notebooks now.

Once Dell, HP and the others come out with their versions of the Intel Metro, the MacBook Air will be done.

Apple needs to concentrate on their core market and produce the successor to the Mini and fill the desktop gap between the Mini and the Mac Pro. The iMac isn't it. It needs to be a headless desktop with expandability like the Mac Pro. Bring back an Intel machine like the G4 PowerMac tower!!!

I'm tired of all these gadgets, that was never what Apple was about.

</rant>

Not sure why your hard drives are dying so fast, I have had dozens of computers and have never had a hard drive fail ever. Successor to the mini, lol. The mini is basically a notebook without a screen. If Apple makes a desktop tower between the mini and the mac pro, that will kill 70% of mac pro sales instantly, Apple know this, thats why they dont.
post #220 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post

$1,000 more than it ought to be for what's inside. Like the cube, this product belongs below the consumer line, not between the consumer and pro line. Less shouldn't cost more.

Less here mostly means volume. There is very little that isn't in it, other than the DVD burner.

Most other comparable machines don't have one either.
post #221 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Dumb question: Do the remotes work across machines?

All the remotes will work any Mac, AppleTV, or IR iPod dock. But you can pair a remote with your AppleTV or Mac, this will link that particular remote control to that device until you unpair it. That paired remote control will still work on any unpaired device; the pairing is only one way as the remote control is too simple of a device as it only sends the signal out.
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post #222 of 400
It's really neat, and slim.. and light weight.. but unnecessarily wide and deep It must have been possible to shrink away the phat borders on the side of the screen.

post #223 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by palegolas View Post

It's really neat, and slim.. and light weight.. but unnecessarily wide and deep It must have been possible to shrink away the phat borders on the side of the screen.


Why MUST it have been possible?
post #224 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

What is difficult to accept is the perception that there are other choices, and a lot of them at that.

That the Dells, Sonys, HPs, etc., offer or have already made available, computers, i.e., laptops and desktops, that far exceed the innovative offerings of Apple, and significantly cheaper. And that they do so quite frequently.

Perhaps I am missing something. Give us an example of who else has addressed your needs.

Are you kidding? The specs are really low, basic functionality has been stripped out, and it's a totally closed system, including the battery. EVERY hardware manufacturer, including Apple, far surpassed this product years ago. Anyone who would find this even remotely usable would probably be better served by a used iBook for a quarter of the cost.
post #225 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by palegolas View Post

It's really neat, and slim.. and light weight.. but unnecessarily wide and deep It must have been possible to shrink away the phat borders on the side of the screen.

"We" won't know anything until "we" find out exactly what panel is being used. Being thinner might have meant having a wider border.

I think shrinking the perimeter might have meant a smaller battery.
post #226 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

Are you kidding? The specs are really low, basic functionality has been stripped out, and it's a totally closed system, including the battery. EVERY hardware manufacturer, including Apple, far surpassed this product years ago. Anyone who would find this even remotely usable would probably be better served by a used iBook for a quarter of the cost.

The iBook would take twice the volume, weigh nearly twice as much, not run as fast and still not have as long of a battery run time. It's not even in the same product class anyway. You shouldn't expect that an ultralight would be the same as a desktop replacement. Are there even any notebooks that used "open" standard batteries? As far as I know, every notebook battery is "closed".
post #227 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

This machine IS between the 10 hour life and doesn't do anything.

This machine isn't for everyone. Surprise!

No machine is for everyone. That's a surprise too, right?

What card options would you want, other than perhaps Firewire, or maybe eSATA?

It already has most everything else built-in.

Once again, I'll try to explain. If I could talk slower, melgross I would. I'll try using smaller words.

All I am saying is that there are many other competitive products on the market that do more, weigh the same, and cost the same or less. These compromises that you keep justifying by saying "no machine is for everyone" DO NOT HAVE TO BE THERE!!!!!!!!!! So even if I take your point that most of those features are not necessary, having an interchangeable battery (hardly a novel idea) and more HDD options (again - they are on the market, this isnt rocket science) just makes the machine appeal to more people.

Or are you saying that Apple would rather debut a new product that doesnt appeal to as many of its target market as possible?
post #228 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Dumb question: Do the remotes work across machines?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

Are you kidding? The specs are really low, basic functionality has been stripped out, and it's a totally closed system, including the battery. EVERY hardware manufacturer, including Apple, far surpassed this product years ago. Anyone who would find this even remotely usable would probably be better served by a used iBook for a quarter of the cost.

They are using a one off processor from Intel. It appears to be a low-voltage Core 2 Duo that is operating below ultra-low-voltage power consumption. There is no other OEM that can say that!

PS: I'm getting really annoyed with the crowd here today. Did AI and Digg combine today?

Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

"We" won't know anything until "we" find out exactly what panel is being used. Being thinner might have meant having a wider border.

I think shrinking the perimeter might have meant a smaller battery.

And a less durable case.
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post #229 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by oilburner View Post

Toshiba R200 - less than 1" thick, 2 USB, SD, VGA, PCMCIA, internal modem, Ethernet wireless b/g. Weight = 2.74lbs. Battery life, approx 3.5 hrs

Panasonic CF-W2 (now the W4 or 5) - CD R/W, 2 USB, wireless b/g, SD, PCMCIA, VGA, EThernet, built in modem, armored HD, 12.1" screen, mono, 2.6 lbs

My current Panasonic CF-Y4 - DVD R/W, (2) USB, wireless b/g, SD, PCMCIA, VGA, Ethernet, built in modem, *armored HD* (tested up to a 4 ft. fall). 14" screen, stereo, and 3.4 lbs.

I'm not starting a flame-war, I *want* a Mac, but I'm looking at my 3 year old Panasonic that still has 15gb of HDD left, a larger screen, built in drive, ethernet, SD, PCMCIA and is only .4lbs heavier! I just dont think I can justify the 1800 to go backwards. Maybe rev.2 or by the WWDC Apple will have some more compelling options for the MBA????

Since you brought these two up:
Toshiba R200 (circa Apr 2005):
$2,099
1.2Ghz ULV Intel
512Mb Ram
2.7lbs
12.1" Screen
60Gb HD
Optical Drive: External

Panasonic CF-W5 (Mar 07):
$1,950
1.2Ghz Core Solo U1400
512Mb Ram
Weight: 2.9lbs
12.1" Screen
60Gb HD
Optical Drive: Internal

So... compared to those two, this isn't looking too bad
$1,799
1.6 Ghz (with 4mb cache, not 512k-1mb like the above two)
2Gb Ram
3.0 Lbs
13.1" Screen
80Gb HD
Optical Drive: Optional

Among subcompacts, the MBA really does well spec-wise. Comparing a subcompact to full size laptops is like comparing a desktop to a server (ie well it doesn't have 2 quad cores so it must suck).
post #230 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by oilburner View Post

All I am saying is that there are many other competitive products on the market that do more, weigh the same, and cost the same or less.

Can you point to those models that are as cheap or cheaper? I've only seen one ultralight that costs less than that, and that was a Dell. Everything else in that size class was more expensive. The current Dell Ultralight D430 is 1.2GHz, Core Solo or Core Duo.
post #231 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by oilburner View Post

Or are you saying that Apple would rather debut a new product that doesnt appeal to as many of its target market as possible?

Target market is not the same as largest possible market, which is what many OEMS do when they try to stuff as many things into the machine to win the oh-so-coveted Tech Specs award.
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post #232 of 400
Crybabies at it again. If you don't like it don't buy it, no one is forcing you. You can also go look elsewhere, Apple will do fine without your whining self.
post #233 of 400
Despite all your cries, this thing will sell very well.

(Hell, I pre-ordered one despite all it's shortcomings)
post #234 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by witheredmind View Post

Since you brought these two up:
Toshiba R200 (circa Apr 2005):
$2,099
1.2Ghz ULV Intel
512Mb Ram
2.7lbs
12.1" Screen
60Gb HD
Optical Drive: External

Panasonic CF-W5 (Mar 07):
$1,950
1.2Ghz Core Solo U1400
512Mb Ram
Weight: 2.9lbs
12.1" Screen
60Gb HD
Optical Drive: Internal

So... compared to those two, this isn't looking too bad
$1,799
1.6 Ghz (with 4mb cache, not 512k-1mb like the above two)
2Gb Ram
3.0 Lbs
13.1" Screen
80Gb HD
Optical Drive: Optional

Among subcompacts, the MBA really does well spec-wise. Comparing a subcompact to full size laptops is like comparing a desktop to a server (ie well it doesn't have 2 quad cores so it must suck).

WM,

You are right except the HDD space for the current models (W7 and Y7) go up signficantly 100gb and up, as do the current models from Toshiba, Dell, other brands (plus internal drives at less weight than the Apple). I was just giving examples of past machines I personally have used. Dont get me wrong - I like this machine a lot, I just wish it had a couple of more options - HDD and battery chief among them.
post #235 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

Can you point to those models that are as cheap or cheaper? I've only seen one ultralight that costs less than that, and that was a Dell. Everything else in that size class was more expensive. The current Dell Ultralight D430 is 1.2GHz, Core Solo or Core Duo.

I dont know. The price isn't an objection that I had. I just want some more options on the checkbox
post #236 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by oilburner View Post

WM,

You are right except the HDD space for the current models (W7 and Y7) go up signficantly 100gb and up, as do the current models from Toshiba, Dell, other brands (plus internal drives at less weight than the Apple). I was just giving examples of past machines I personally have used. Dont get me wrong - I like this machine a lot, I just wish it had a couple of more options - HDD and battery chief among them.

Panasonic W7
(Around $2,500)
1.06Ghz U7500 Intel Core 2 Duo (2mb cache)
1Gb Std (up to 2gb)
80Gb HD
12.1" Screen
3.0 Lbs
Optical Drive: Integrated
Also: 1.4"-2.0" thick (verses 0.16" to 0.76" for the MBA)

Panasonic Y7
(Around $2,300)
1.6Ghz L7500 Intel 4Mb Cache (looks to be the same processor as the MBA)
1Gb Std (up to 2)
80Gb HD
14.1" Screen
3.7 Lbs
Optical Drive: Integrated
Thickness: 1.4"-1.8"

So... these aren't faster nor do they have larger hard drives, more memory, weigh less, or cost less. I'm sure that you might be able to customize these, but that's not going to make them cost any less.
post #237 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by witheredmind View Post

Panasonic W7

Panasonic Y7

So... these aren't faster nor do they have larger hard drives, more memory, weigh less, or cost less. I'm sure that you might be able to customize these, but that's not going to make them cost any less.

These are Toughbookst. While they make some ultra-light machines they don't make for a fair comparison with other ultra-lights.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #238 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Ah, someone who thinks he knows something, when he actually doesn't.

he said, totally unaware of the irony
post #239 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by oilburner View Post

Once again, I'll try to explain. If I could talk slower, melgross I would. I'll try using smaller words.

That's pretty dumb on your part. It makes the rest of what you're saying less credible.
post #240 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by quinney View Post

he said, totally unaware of the irony

Irony would be lost on you.
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