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Apple's new MacBook Air dubbed world’s thinnest notebook - Page 8

post #281 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post

They took 2006's MacBook, took out half the parts, and doubled the price. It's a very very elegant piece of machinery, but the sum of the parts equals $800, not $1800.

If that were true, yes. But as we all know, it isn't.

Do some research before you make silly statements like that.

A simple look on Apple's website would show you that you are wrong.
post #282 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by tuneman07 View Post

I am very disappointed with this MBA. This thing is going to flop huge- think about it- this is a downgrade in performance from the macbook, and its thinner by less than an inch, but costs 700 bucks more. This isn't really any more portable- it actually has bigger dimensions than the macbook aside from the thickness. I can't see people paying 700 more for that thin aspect. Honestly I think this is a sort of tech showoff novelty. There is no way Apple can expect this thing to actually be a hit as far as sales are concerned. You can just get wayyyyyyyyy too much in the computer world for 1700 bucks to buy this thing. It is cool, but completely pointless to buy. There is no way this will fit anywhere your MB won't.

Then you don't understand the point to ultralights. If it means nothing to you, then none of the others will either.
post #283 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCMacFan View Post

Been thinking about this. I will probably buy, but still a bit of a let down. I don't mind the prices and may even go with the SSD. Unlike others I am a big fan of the full sized keyboard and full sized screen. Having said that, I have 4 concerns (I wrote about them earlier):

1. I think this could have been less than 3 lbs, maybe 12.5. I look at Toshiba and Panasonic offerings. They are not as thin, but lighter and smaller footprint. Some of those have 12inch screens, but they also have optical drives and a ton of ports. I don't want an optical drive or ports, but I do want to know why this MBA isn't gosh darn lighter given it skimps on all of those. I mean a panasonic R500 is 12inch, with an optical drive and is 1.75 lbs.

2. But it could have been narrower. I am typing on in iBook G4 12inch. I note the foot print of the MBA is wider than the existing MB and even a 14inch Panasonic. What's up with the wasted space to the left and right of the keyboard and screen. Rivals don't use this space. I really wonder if this tapered design has led to wasting space. If this was more square like an PB G4 12inch, would this have been lighter and narrower (albeit not the world's thinest).

3. I don't mind that the battery is not removable that much, but again would accept this compromise if it had a longer listed battery time or lighter weight. 5 hours with an LED is not that impressive. The SSD had better be lighter and offer battery life.

4. Speaking of which, why is there no listing of battery life and weight with SSD as other manufacturers do. I am supposed to pre-order with no word on this? I am sure someone asked on this in meetings at Apple. So the question is why didn't they choose to list it.

First of all, take a few minutes and watch the Keynote (about the 57 minute mark). Perhaps when you see how compact everything is and realize there is no extra space available you will better understand.

Secondly, look at the fine print. A lot of the things one takes for granted because Apple includes them is that they are not included in the competitors offerings. For example, they are not lighter as one doesn't include the 6.4 oz standard battery in their weight calculation.

And look at battery life that the opposing proposes. Again in the fine print, albeit buried deep in their web sites, is references to extended battery life as measured using the computer to play music only," not real life computing. Read the fine print on Apple's spec pages. It is open for consideration and it isn't composed as some have done when purporting 'longer' battery life to find that it referred to their 'optional' Extended Batteries which weighed significantly more. And I mean significantly.

By the way, that Toshiba R500 21.1" weighs 3.4 lbs with the standard battery. And look at measly processor, the dismal RAM, slow graphic's card, lack of built-in camera and just a RGB video output, etc.
post #284 of 400
It's amazing at how many computers people are quoting as being lighter, cheaper, or otherwise, are really not, once the actual specs are looked at.

I would have liked this to weigh a bit less, but it is what it is.

One reason is that the die cast aluminum case weighs a few ounces more than the plastic used by others, even those that have incredibly thin metal structures inside that parts are screwed to.
post #285 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

By the way, that Toshiba R500 21.1" weighs 3.4 lbs with the standard battery. And look at measly processor, the dismal RAM, slow graphic's card, lack of built-in camera and just a RGB video output, etc.

There are different battery configurations. 2.5lbs with a smaller battery (which is GASP removable) and that's with an optical drive, but a smaller screen. The SSD version is 1.72lbs without an optical drive. That is 12inches not 13 and yes not as fast a processor. But it is 40% lighter than Apple. Not as thin, but smaller and appreciably lighter.

Hey. I'll still probably buy the MBA (thinking with SSD as work pays). But I won't be an Apple apologist. Simple fact - Apple could have done better..
post #286 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

It's amazing at how many computers people are quoting as being lighter, cheaper, or otherwise, are really not, once the actual specs are looked at.

Umm.. Lighter and smaller footprint, yes. Cheaper, not really. Faster or better, definitely not. But they do achieve lighter. Apple failed here.

I also remain ticked off at not having a breakdown of weight, battery and other differences between HDD and SSD. If you want me to pre-order and drop 1000 for an SSD, don't you think I deserve this info Apple...
post #287 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCMacFan View Post

Umm.. Lighter and smaller footprint, yes. Cheaper, not really. Faster or better, definitely not. But they do achieve lighter. Apple failed here.

I remain ticked off at not having a breakdown of weight, battery and other differences between HDD and SSD. If you want me to pre-order and drop 1000 for an SSD, don't you think I deserve this info Apple...

Most aren't lighter once you add the weight of the battery, which mysteriously, is often left out of the specs, and must be added separately.

There is almost no difference in weight between the HDD and the SSD that Apple is offering.

Almost no manufacturer that offers an optional SSD (almost no manufacturers offer one yet) gives that info. But, you can look it up.

It's really easy. I typed 64 GB SSD in Google, and here's the search page that came up.

http://www.google.com/search?client=...UTF-8&oe=UTF-8
post #288 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCMacFan View Post

There are different battery configurations. 2.5lbs with a smaller battery (which is GASP removable) and that's with an optical drive, but a smaller screen. The SSD version is 1.72lbs without an optical drive. That is 12inches not 13 and yes not as fast a processor. But it is 40% lighter than Apple. Not as thin, but smaller and appreciably lighter.

Hey. I'll still probably buy the MBA (thinking with SSD as work pays). But I won't be an Apple apologist. Simple fact - Apple could have done better..

That isn't a fact, simple or otherwise. That is an opinion, and a not very informed one at that. You are comparing a 12" machine with a mini-keyboard and smaller footprint and cheap plastic parts and pointing out how it's lighter.

When you look at all the parts of the machine you see that Apple engineering did a great job with this machine. The battery is probably the heaviest part of this device. They could have made it smaller to reduce weight but by sacrificing usage time. They also could have used a slower processor. This would have reduced cost, saved on space and allowed for a smaller battery at the same usage time, but again, at what cost? A machine that is dog slow?

They comprised well. As the target consumer for this product this device is nearly perfect. I would have liked integrated 3G but having to use a USB dongle isn't going to make me cancel my order.

If you compare it to an ULW machine that 12 inches or less ir will probably be lighter, but you are looking the sum of the parts, you're just focusing on one aspect of it. I have a real world need for this device and I'm glad it finally arrived.

What will be interesting is to see performance comparisons to all these other supposedly better machines that cost more and are running 1.0GHz ULVs. What excuse will the Pearitians going to be pulling out their ass next?
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post #289 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCMacFan View Post

Umm.. Lighter and smaller footprint, yes. Cheaper, not really. Faster or better, definitely not. But they do achieve lighter. Apple failed here.

Is you issue that Apple didn't make a 14" notebook with a full keyboard lighter than other ULWs? As i recall from the keynote, the ideal was around 3lbs. I don't think Apple was trying to achieve the lightest notebook but was trying to achieve the the most ideal notebook for the average business traveler.
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post #290 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Most aren't lighter once you add the weight of the battery, which mysteriously, is often left out of the specs, and must be added separately.

There is almost no difference in weight between the HDD and the SSD that Apple is offering.

Almost no manufacturer that offers an optional SSD (almost no manufacturers offer one yet) gives that info. But, you can look it up.

It's really easy. I typed 64 GB SSD in Google, and here's the search page that came up.

http://www.google.com/search?client=...UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

Thanks for the homework assignment without answering the question. Toshiba breaks down the weight difference on their model, but it has other differences (no optical drive, tinier battery I believe).

The question is what is the weight difference between a 1.8 HDD and a 1.8 SSD. That I found harder to find... According to Samsung = a 1.8 SSD is 20 to 44grams. It's lower than 20grams if you had soldered it. A typical HDD is 62grams. Apple could have optimized either. But if you are saving 40 grams that is 1.3 ounces.

The SSD consumes 1/3 of the power of an HDD. This can add up, though the other components are bigger hogs. An SSD, with an LV processor, good management and a LED screen should allow a small battery and a small converter with a reasonably good battery life.
post #291 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Is you issue that Apple didn't make a 14" notebook with a full keyboard lighter than other ULWs? As i recall from the keynote, the ideal was around 3lbs. I don't think Apple was trying to achieve the lightest notebook but was trying to achieve the the most ideal notebook for the average business traveler.

No I concur and personally am very happy with the full sized keyboard and screen. I find a 12inch widescreen too small. I am typing this on a 12 inch PB/ibook non-widescreen from the earlier generation. It has the same vertical space as the 13.3 but is narrower with less horizontal space (mostly a waste to me).

But I think a different design would have yielded something closer to 2.5 lbs and something slightly narrower on the sides. Its also possible the extra weight went into build quality on the case, in which case I am more forgiving...
post #292 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCMacFan View Post

I also remain ticked off at not having a breakdown of weight, battery and other differences between HDD and SSD. If you want me to pre-order and drop 1000 for an SSD, don't you think I deserve this info Apple...

I've ordered the stock configuration, and it's definitely the best deal. A little faster (and more power hungry) for $300? No thanks? And $1000 for a smaller, presumably much faster and slightly more efficient, drive? That's crazy. If you want that drive, wait 6 months before buying this computer. Then you'll have more options or at least save a few hundred bucks.
post #293 of 400
Quote:
My question exactly. I love Apple and may buy this, but for the record, look at what Panasonic and Toshiba have done with less weight:

Panasonic is 1.74" thick. Uses 1.06GHz CPU. Intel GMA965. No LED screen. Costs $2199

Toshiba is 1.57" thick. 1.2GHz CPU. Intel GMA950. No LED screen. Costs $2149

MBA .76" thick. Uses 1.6GHz CPU. Intel X3100 GPU. LED screen. Costs $1799.
post #294 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCMacFan View Post

No I concur and personally am very happy with the full sized keyboard and screen. I find a 12inch widescreen too small. I am typing this on a 12 inch PB/ibook non-widescreen from the earlier generation. It has the same vertical space as the 13.3 but is narrower with less horizontal space (mostly a waste to me).

But I think a different design would have yielded something closer to 2.5 lbs and something slightly narrower on the sides. Its also possible the extra weight went into build quality on the case, in which case I am more forgiving...

Being aluminuum and tapering so much on the sides does make this wider. If they made this a the typical boxed design you see from other OEM and the 12"PB they could have brought the keyboard right to the side but the design does add some strength and rigidity to the structure. They could have also shed some weight by reducing the size of the battery and then used a ULV to maintain some of that battery time.

What we have is a 1.6GHz "Merom" C2D and 5 hours battery life in a 3lb package with a 13" display and full-size keyboard. That is absolutely ideal, IMO.
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post #295 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell View Post

Panasonic is 1.74" thick. Uses 1.06GHz CPU. Intel GMA965. No LED screen. Costs $2199

Toshiba is 1.57" thick. 1.2GHz CPU. Intel GMA950. No LED screen. Costs $2149

MBA .76" thick. Uses 1.6GHz CPU. Intel X3100 GPU. LED screen. Costs $1799.

In defense of the naysayers, those other machines typically are thicker but have a smaller footprint as they are 12" models.
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post #296 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by malax View Post

I've ordered the stock configuration, and it's definitely the best deal. A little faster (and more power hungry) for $300? No thanks? And $1000 for a smaller, presumably much faster and slightly more efficient, drive? That's crazy. If you want that drive, wait 6 months before buying this computer. Then you'll have more options or at least save a few hundred bucks.

Or buy the same config as you. Wait 1 year, have a third party replace the HDD with an SSD when its cheaper or with a 128gig. I live in NYC and so can take it to tekserve.
post #297 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCMacFan View Post

Thanks for the homework assignment without answering the question. Toshiba breaks down the weight difference on their model, but it has other differences (no optical drive, tinier battery I believe).

The question is what is the weight difference between a 1.8 HDD and a 1.8 SSD. That I found harder to find... According to Samsung = a 1.8 SSD is 20 to 44grams. It's lower than 20grams if you had soldered it. A typical HDD is 62grams. Apple could have optimized either. But if you are saving 40 grams that is 1.3 ounces.

The SSD consumes 1/3 of the power of an HDD. This can add up, though the other components are bigger hogs. An SSD, with an LV processor, good management and a LED screen should allow a small battery and a small converter with a reasonably good battery life.

I already said the difference was small, and it is.

It's not going to be 40 grams for a 64 GB SSD, more like 20.

Overall, even if it were 32 grams (an ounce) it would make no discernible difference to the user.

I have little interest in the minor weight differential, you do, so I gave you a headstart.
post #298 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Being aluminuum and tapering so much on the sides does make this wider. If they made this a the typical boxed design you see from other OEM and the 12"PB they could have brought the keyboard right to the side but the design does add some strength and rigidity to the structure. They could have also shed some weight by reducing the size of the battery and then used a ULV to maintain some of that battery time.

What we have is a 1.6GHz "Merom" C2D and 5 hours battery life in a 3lb package with a 13" display and full-size keyboard. That is absolutely ideal, IMO.

I'll bite and likely but with same config as you. I appreciate that they did not go with ULV. But had the ULV gotten you down to say 2.5 with same battery life or 3lb with 7 hours, I am not sure if I would not have prefered that. I'm typing on a G4 and so its all blazing fast to me.

I could go for 1.8ghz, but then I guess that may have less battery life too...
post #299 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCMacFan View Post

Or buy the same config as you. Wait 1 year, have a third party replace the HDD with an SSD when its cheaper or with a 128gig. I live in NYC and so can take it to tekserve.

That would make sense. Tekserve is very good, and Dave, one of the owners I know, is a very honest guy. they do good work.
post #300 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I already said the difference was small, and it is.

It's not going to be 40 grams for a 64 GB SSD, more like 20.

Overall, even if it were 32 grams (an ounce) it would make no discernible difference to the user.

I have little interest in the minor weight differential, you do, so I gave you a headstart.

More of an issue where you get a combined savings from the SSD and a slightly smaller battery it allows. This is also part of the do you go ULV or LV approach...

When you start to talk about LED, plus SSD, plus ULV or LV and then you get a lower energy requirement, it means the power brick gets smaller, the battery is smaller and so the case can be smaller. It just the cascading effects of different types of energy savings on weight all around.

Even with no weight savings, I don't expect SSD adds to much to battery life, but 10% on 5 hours is still an extra 30 minutes... Nice, just hard to pay 1,000 for it.
post #301 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

That would make sense. Tekserve is very good, and Dave, one of the owners I know, is a very honest guy. they do good work.

This opens up the same option with any potential battery replacement. Hopefully this is longer lived than some others. I just fear the hastle for people in some non-urban areas.
post #302 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCMacFan View Post

More of an issue where you get a combined savings from the SSD and a slightly smaller battery it allows. This is also part of the do you go ULV or LV approach...

I don't expect SSD adds to much to battery life, but 10% on 5 hours is still an extra 30 minutes...

I don't think Apple would have gone for the smaller battery, they would have gone for the extra 15 to 20 extra minutes of life.

The actual battery life you save depends on what you do. If you watch long video's on the machine, then it will mean a lot, but if what you do uses the drive little, it won't mean much at all.

If Apple went for a ULV, people would be complaining about that.

If they didn't backlight the keys, that would be an area of complaint, etc. Where does it stop?
post #303 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCMacFan View Post

This opens up the same option with any potential battery replacement. Hopefully this is longer lived than some others. I just fear the hastle for people in some non-urban areas.

I think the battery is a non issue. I've never had to replace the batteries on my smartphones, or most any other thing i own.

By the time this battery works down, taking it to Apple to replace won't be a big deal. There are advantages to a sealed in battery, such as size andyup, weight.
post #304 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by wirc View Post

They cut some interesting things here. No computer lock? Mono speaker? Analog audio only?

Otherwise, everything seems executed with characteristic boldness. Well done.

yes, and no firewire. It has the price of a 'pro', but you can't connect professional devices. It is indeed a beautiful, light, thin and expensive computer with amazing engineering. But, I rather have a heavier one with all the necessary ports for actually being able to work. It is definitely a secondary computer. You need to have a 'real' one at home, because it is not good enough for being your only computer.
post #305 of 400
go to bed.
post #306 of 400
I think there are a number of interesting points here - the big thing, as has been pointed out, is that rather than trying to make a machine that was consciously smaller and better in every way from the competition, Apple have taken an 'average' weight of 3lbs and used that as a starting point, as well as a desire to have a 'full size' display and keyboard.

As for what ports/devices it does or doesn't have - this is largely a personal opinion. I think only 1 USB port is a little odd, but that's nothing a hub can't solve.

I like the look of it. I don't need a laptop - my old windows machine does just fine for those few times I fancy computing while not being sat at a desk - but I would like one! I can't quite justify spending the same amount as my iMac plus £50 2 months after said iMac was bought!
post #307 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCMacFan View Post

Or buy the same config as you. Wait 1 year, have a third party replace the HDD with an SSD when its cheaper or with a 128gig. I live in NYC and so can take it to tekserve.

Excellent point. I also hope the third-party market responds positively to this (i.e., they predict it will be a hit and therefore a viable market) and offer:

1) an external battery pack (preferably using off the shelf batteries) for emergencies. How long could you power a notebook with 4 AA lithium batteries? An hour? 5 mins?

2) ... hmm, I guess there is no number 2; there are already tons of USB port replicators if you need one.
post #308 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Then you don't understand the point to ultralights. If it means nothing to you, then none of the others will either.

Did I read something different there? HE simply doesn't understand the priceing which is different.
$3,000 for that laptop is way too high. It should sell well in Neiman Marcus though and be a big hit in Dubai!
post #309 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenoBell View Post

Panasonic is 1.74" thick. Uses 1.06GHz CPU. Intel GMA965. No LED screen. Costs $2199

Toshiba is 1.57" thick. 1.2GHz CPU. Intel GMA950. No LED screen. Costs $2149

MBA .76" thick. Uses 1.6GHz CPU. Intel X3100 GPU. LED screen. Costs $1799.


Sorry, we don't allow facts here. This place is for general pussy moaning about Apple and Steve Jobs.
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post #310 of 400
Another point I'd like to make:

If three fucking pounds is too much, then go to a fucking gym.
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post #311 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by Powelligator View Post

I'm exactly the person the MBA is marketed at.

I spend a third of my life in airplanes, airports and hotel rooms. I carry a late model PowerBook G4 with one extra battery, an Airport Express, a bluetooth mouse, headphones, a 60 GB older iPod and a small digital camera. When I get home, I dutifully plug in a 500 GB FW 800 drive to back up with, plug in an external 20" monitor, a nice set of speakers and an external bluetooth keyboard. So far, so good. I'm not going to switch to a windows machine, I like my "Apple Experience" quite well, thank you, so comparisons of whizzy Sony's and Dells will do nothing to sway me. I like my computer to just effin' *work*. But it is getting old, so...

Time to upgrade, it's been a couple o' years, so I've been looking forward to this new Power, er, ah... MacBook. How's this going to affect me? Let's see...

Currently I have ports in this Mac I don't ever use, a card slot, old firewire, S-Video and audio *in* are all useless to me. I rarely use the CD/DVD whatever burner in there - it does double-sided DVD's or somesuchthing, but it don't matter because I don't use it. Looking at the MBA all I'd lose is the FW 800, and that can be addressed by plugging in my 500 GB external to my older, round Airport Base Station via USB. Oh, right, that feature isn't supported. Darn you, Apple. Maybe have to buy one of those new integrated airports with disk. Not a deal breaker.

With a five hour (claimed) battery I can make it across the country on a single charge. I hope I don't have to sit on the tarmac in Newark for three hours waiting for the weather to clear so we can fly for three more hours to Denver. Sure wish United business class had power outlets in their seats.

Time to move my files over. Uh oh... On my current 80 GB drive I only have 1.49 GB free. Yeah, my iTunes library is up over 60 GB but I like my music and I have a handful of TV shows. I'd like to be able to have a larger hard drive, because let's face it, I'm just too lazy to spend a few hours and clean out some files I don't need.

Darn it, if it wasn't for the 80 GB drive this would be the perfect computer for me. I was looking forward to a disk *upgrade*. That's a deal breaker. Looks like I'll be back to another, reliable old aluminum PowerBook. MacBook. Whatever.

-Gator

External usb drives are getting dirt freaking cheap now. I saw a 2TB drive at Best Buy for $599. Two terrabytes. Now that's a looooot of porn and CSI Vegas on that.
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post #312 of 400
Quote:
In defense of the naysayers, those other machines typically are thicker but have a smaller footprint as they are 12" models.

An inch makes that much difference? The naysayers also completely miss that those other ultra lights are slower and have poorer specs but cost more.

Quote:
$3,000 for that laptop is way too high. It should sell well in Neiman Marcus though and be a big hit in Dubai!

That is with the SDD. Dell and Sony laptops cost more if you include an SSD.
post #313 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by malax View Post

From what I can tell the Panasonic something like $800 more with only 512MB of RAM and a 60 gig drive. Apple really did price the MacBook Air aggressively.

The most important aspect of the Air is the 3 pound weight. However they wanted to be the "worst _____est" something, so they are trumpeting the thinness. The thinness is cool, but's it's the lightness that I'll appreciate.

I suspect that the engineers were told "make it the thinnest" and keep it to 3.0 lbs. It must have been a tough call not to budge on those constraints to allow a 160gig option for an extra $100 (like the 2 versions of the iPod Classic). 80 gig is barely adequate I'd say. Whoever suggested a 32 gig SSD option would have been good hasn't really thought it through. You'd be hard pressed to install the OS and a set of basic apps on 32 gig and then where is your VM swap space that OS X is addicted to?

Oh I forgot the link for the Panasonic: http://www.icube.us/product_detail.c...odel/CF-Y5.cfm

That is a 2-generation old Panasonic.
post #314 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

It's amazing at how many computers people are quoting as being lighter, cheaper, or otherwise, are really not, once the actual specs are looked at.

I would have liked this to weigh a bit less, but it is what it is.

One reason is that the die cast aluminum case weighs a few ounces more than the plastic used by others, even those that have incredibly thin metal structures inside that parts are screwed to.

The Panasonics use Magnesium cases - lighter and stronger than aluminum. Dont forget - they maintain an ultralight laptop (sub 3lbs for 12" screen, and 3.3 lbs for 14" screen) while shock-armoring them. All Steve wants is to make them purdy.

Maybe you could define who YOU think the target customer is for this, since you can not handle anyone questioning it. I have exclusively bought ultralights for the past 10 years for myself and my team. I know in the real world how ultralights are used and what features make "bare minimum" for the average traveling businessperson.

Since this product is clearly not targeted at the design-crowd (RAM, HDD, video limitations) I am assuming that it is targeted at those who use ultralights, which demographically tend to be people who cherish light weight and form factor over features - businesspeople who travel a lot and use the laptop for their work. But Apple (IMHO) dropped the ball with two critical features (from conversations/usage from many people that I have talked to/worked with over many years) - larger HDD, and replaceable battery.

You can retort with "then go buy another computer" and I might end up having to do that. My point here was to vent my frustration that I have wanted to switch for the past year and was waiting for this machine to answer my needs. So yes, I might end up having to stay with another Windows machine against my wishes.
post #315 of 400
never had a apple before but considering it, friends got macbook and im nt keen would much prefer the air.

all i require it for is university stuff n stuff like that?!

i know the air is'nt worth the Uk price of £1200 but im considering it?!

wat should i do...hmmmmmmmm!!! lol
post #316 of 400
Well, the MacBook Air fits my home usage to a tee. I'd use it as a seconday computer in the living room, bedroom, kitchen, dining/breakfast table, even in the closet, etc. It fits me to a tee. So, way thumbs for me!

The size compromises (and resultant features) they made are classic Apple, and in the direction I think it an ultra-portable should go.

They chose thinness over footprint: thin objects are more comfortable to transport in bags and such because we are already used to carrying 8.5 x 11 paper-sized or 9 x 12 folder sized things. A thick object (1+ inches) can easily stretch a bag. All other features cascaded from there. 1.8 inch single platter drive instead of 2 platter (though they maybe leaving this as an upgrade path), no SO-DIMM slots, enclosed battery design. I think they could have added at least another USB port on the other side, and possibly a line-in. A full sized Firewire port looks out of the question as is an Ethernet port.

For price, I'm not quite sure yet. For business, it's truly great price. For consumers, well, this is where Apple is testing the waters I think. Apple is a consumer company through-and-through, and the MBA will live or die based on consumers willing to be a second laptop.
post #317 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Did I read something different there? HE simply doesn't understand the priceing which is different.
$3,000 for that laptop is way too high. It should sell well in Neiman Marcus though and be a big hit in Dubai!

THat's what SSD's do to a computer these days. It wasn't long ago when 32 GB SSD's cost more than that. You want a 128? The SSD alone is $3,000.

I'm just disappointed that bigger 1.8" drives weren't made available. It's been said that Apple gets a very good deal on the 80 because it's in the Classic, which is selling pretty well, but not on any other size.

You don't have to buy that version though with the SSD, unless it's just for bragging rights. no other laptop that uses one will be much cheaper, and if it is, it's because the computer IS cheaper, if you know what I mean.
post #318 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by oilburner View Post

The Panasonics use Magnesium cases - lighter and stronger than aluminum. Dont forget - they maintain an ultralight laptop (sub 3lbs for 12" screen, and 3.3 lbs for 14" screen) while shock-armoring them. All Steve wants is to make them purdy.

Maybe you could define who YOU think the target customer is for this, since you can not handle anyone questioning it. I have exclusively bought ultralights for the past 10 years for myself and my team. I know in the real world how ultralights are used and what features make "bare minimum" for the average traveling businessperson.

Since this product is clearly not targeted at the design-crowd (RAM, HDD, video limitations) I am assuming that it is targeted at those who use ultralights, which demographically tend to be people who cherish light weight and form factor over features - businesspeople who travel a lot and use the laptop for their work. But Apple (IMHO) dropped the ball with two critical features (from conversations/usage from many people that I have talked to/worked with over many years) - larger HDD, and replaceable battery.

You can retort with "then go buy another computer" and I might end up having to do that. My point here was to vent my frustration that I have wanted to switch for the past year and was waiting for this machine to answer my needs. So yes, I might end up having to stay with another Windows machine against my wishes.

Since most of us here question your statements, you can direct it to everyone.

Those mag frames aren't cases. The cases are rubberized plastic. The frame is a thin metal casting that averages less than a mm thick in most places, and is what the internal components are screwed to. It doesn't cover anything, just holds them together. I discussed this earlier.

I don't know how you define ultralights, because by todays standards, they didn't exist ten years ago.

The market for any new product is always hard to completely define. we can look at the iPhone for that. It was though it would not get into business, but the reports are that it is pushing its way in very well.

I suspect that people who would spend $1200 to $1500 will move their price to cover this. Business people will buy them, despite the lack of a separate battery (which someone will quickly come up with a solution for). Journalists will love them. Students going to college will buy them (yes, I know, poor students won't, but they couldn't afford a MacBook either). Peope who just must have a really obviously tinner mchine will buy one.

And, of course, a lot of Apple customers who don't necessarily fit any of those categories will also buy one.

This machine can actually do more work than you might suspect. I certainly don't expect heavy duty users of PS or video to use this, but it can do graphics nicely and publishing as well. With ultralight screens being smaller and having less resolution, by todays standards, no ultralight is ideal here, but when on a trip, this could work pretty well.
post #319 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by dvsryan View Post

Hmmmm....

It seems to me that Apple is directly going for the women and/or gay community here. They have to expand market share somehow, right? Truthfully, and objectively, ask yourself, what is the advantage to buying the Air? This machine is exclusively for checking desperate housewives blogs, nothing else. Another underpowered, overpriced, underwhelming hardware release. Are you guys really so wimpy that you need to have the lightest notebook on earth? Was that Macbook really that heavy? Keep buying into the "design" of Apple. Staring at the shiny outside, you will never realize that computers are only tools, not fashion statements.

No need to dis women and gays, just act like the governator and call it a girly machine. It may be overpriced, weak and anorexic but it definitely makes a fashion statement!
post #320 of 400
Here is a good read on the MacBook air by Wil Shipley.
MacBook Air Haters: Suck My D!@k
I thought of a lot of titles for this post, but, really, the first one that came to me seems the best.

I've read nothing but whining about the MacBook Air on Mac news sites since it came out this morning. Honestly, I just want to shake these people. Not, like, shake some sense into them, but shake them like you're not supposed to shake a baby.

The criticism all basically goes like this: "It's not like a MacBook Pro!"

No, really? Seriously? I mean, they introduced this new product, and it doesn't have the same specs as the MacBook Pro? God, that is bizarre. I wonder why they gave it a new name, and continue to sell the MacBook Pro, then, if it's not going to be exactly the same. I mean, that hardly makes sense, does it?

(continue)
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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