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First Look: Apple's new MacBook Air (with photos and video)

post #1 of 187
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After hoisting teaser Macworld Expo banners of "something in the air," it seemed likely that the slogan would be an allusion to wireless networking. Instead, Steve Jobs exhaled the MacBook Air, a new ultra light laptop widely rumored in advance to be the star of the show.

Echoing the drama of the iPhone presented last year in a glass capsule, Apple suspended a series of MacBook Air units on a cable stretching from the floor to the ceiling (below) at the show.



Apple security first reprimanded anyone touching the models, but by the end of the day people were casually grabbing and commonly spinning the units. If handling the merchandise is any prediction of sales, the MacBook Air should blow off the shelves in gale force winds. The constant, enraptured pawing made it nearly impossible to capture any shots of the new laptops.



Something in the Heir

Anticipating rumors commonly speculated about the release of a new slim laptop under the name MacBook mini, but despite its thinness and light weight, there's nothing really mini about the new MacBook Air. It has a full size keyboard that's nearly identical to the existing MacBook and the aluminum keyboards that debuted with the new iMac a few months ago.

The Air also has a full size 13.3" display driven by the same Intel GMA X3100 graphics processor as the MacBook (both share 144 MB DDR2 SDRAM from main memory for the display), which supports external display resolutions up to 1920 x 1200, the native resolution of a 23" Cinema Display. It also supports analog VGA and TV output in composite and S-Video flavors.

The new laptop also has a capable processor slightly slower than the current MacBooks (a Core Duo running at 1.6 or 1.8 GHz versus 2 or 2.2 GHz in the MacBooks, and 2.2 to 2.6 GHz processors available in the MacBook Pro), and 2GB of RAM built in as standard. Unlike the other MacBook models, there is no user serviceable upgrades or replacements for RAM, hard drive, battery, nor an ExpressCard expansion slot.



Apple's Light Laptop Legacy

Critics have already pounced on the design decisions of the MacBook Air, insisting that it needs various ports, a lid that allows users to swap out the battery, and future expansion slots for RAM and various other things. Critics need to say something of course, but the Air is clearly not intended to be a MacBook Pro killer, but rather a revival of the ultra portable Mac laptop.

Apple pioneered development of ultra portable laptops back in 1992 with the Powerbook Duo, a lighter thinner laptop designed to sacrifice features on the road but pair with a dock that turned it into a more capable desktop system in the office. A stationary Duo Dock injected the Duo laptop like a cassette and provided it with additional RAM and VRAM, access to full size expansion slots, a math coprocessor, level 2 cache, a secondary hard drive, a floppy disk, and keyboard and mouse ports. The Duo was loved by a small segment of users who liked its portability and versatility, but the product line did not meet sales expectations.

After the Duo was discontinued in 1997, the closest Apple came to delivering a lightweight road warrior laptop was the 2003 12" Aluminum PowerBook, which at 1.18" thick and 4.6 pounds was thinner and nearly as light as the 1.4" thick and 4.2 pound PowerBook Duo models. Unlike the Duos, the 12" PowerBook was a relatively speedy, full featured laptop with a good quality display and full array of ports.

The 12" Powerbook was discontinued in mid 2006 with the release of the new 13" MacBooks. While slightly larger and heavier at 5.2 pounds, the slightly thinner 1.08" MacBook delivered better performance and general purpose appeal at a competitive price that helped to lead a resurgence of interest in Mac laptops. Apple's Mac sales have since followed an industry trend turning decidedly toward laptops. It's therefore no surprise that the newest Mac is another new laptop.

MacBook Air Versus Ultralight Laptops

The obvious niche that made the star of Macworld 2008 easy to predict was an ultra light weight laptop designed to serve the needs of mobile professionals. While Apple was among the first companies to deliver light laptops back in the early 90s, it hasn't recently joined the bleeding edge of ultra portable laptops led by the Fujitsu Lifebook, Panasonic R5, Lenovo X series, and Sony VAIO G series. These machines and similar models vary greatly in the features, portability, and performance they offer, making direct comparisons somewhat difficult.

Apple's new MacBook Air chooses to specialize in being very light and thin while also offering full size graphics performance. The result targets users who want a capable laptop with extreme portability, rather than an ultra tiny device, a budget priced laptop alternative, a more general purpose system with wide open versatility, or a small system that drops video output features and screen resolution to deliver a basic web browsing machine.

How MacBook Air Gets Thin

In order to make the Air thinner than the MacBook and MacBook Pro, Apple had to streamline its features. Across the board, Apple turned the laptop from a computing machine into a slim appliance. There's simply no room for lots of ports, as this photo and video clip of the MacBook Air on top of a 15" MacBook Pro (below) indicate.





The optical audio input and output jacks of the MacBook are gone and a simple stereo headphone jack takes their place. There's also no room for a full sized DVI port, so Apple included a new high density micro-DVI video output port that looks about the same size as a USB port. Using dongles, the device can output DVI for a modern monitor, VGA for analog monitors and video projectors, and even S-Video or composite video for use with a TV or simple projector.

The third port on the MacBook Air is its single USB port. It lacks the convenience of multiple USB ports on each side as the other MacBooks, but this allows all of the Air's ports to hide behind a single flip down cover (below), leaving the rest of the unit with slim, aerodynamic edges. Users with needs for multiple USB devices will need to carry a USB hub.





There are no other jacks: no Firewire, no Ethernet, and no ExpressCard expansion. That means the USB port will have to supply all the alternatives. Fortunately, there are plenty. Most external hard drives support USB, Sierra Wireless makes cellular mobile cards that work using USB, and Apple plans to offer a USB Ethernet adapter and USB modem.

Also missing is an optical drive. It's possible to buy Apple's own slim, external USB SuperDrive for $99, but the new laptop also has a Bonjour-powered, wireless file sharing feature called Remote Disc that allows you to borrow the optical drive of any nearby networked Mac or PC. Doing so requires the installation of software that comes with the Air; it allows the Air to send a request to use the optical drive of a networked computer, and allows PCs to host Mac formatted HFS discs.

There's nothing really magical going on with Remote Disk; it is essentially just setting up a file share that targets the optical drive and makes it Bonjour-easy to discover, select, and connect. Since most people only use their optical drive to install software or play DVDs, Remote Disc solves the first problem. To address the second problem, Apple recommends users ditch DVDs for iTunes movies.

Remote Disc also supports NetBoot functions, so you can boot from a wirelessly shared CD or DVD. In addition, you can use the new Wireless Migration Assistant to bypass the missing Firewire port when importing your files and user settings from an existing computer.

On page 2 of 2: Rich Features; A Sealed Ecosystem; RAM and Disks; and The Envelope, Please.

Rich Features

The MacBook Air has a MagSafe connector (below), but it is positioned on the bottom in such a way that you won't really be able to share power supplies between the Air and other MacBooks. The connectors are compatible, but the Air requires an angled plug in order to lie flat. The Air's 37 watt hour battery also sips less power, and only requires a relatively small 45 watt power adapter. MacBooks use a 60 watt adapter and MacBook Pros use a 85 watt unit, so the Air's adapter won't feed other laptops with enough juice to charge them.



Despite the modicum of ports, the Air includes a iSight camera and built-in mic for video conferencing, and even includes the MacBook Pro's illuminated keyboard controlled by ambient light sensors, making it easier to type in dimly lit locations such as on an airplane.

The other hot feature is its large multi-touch trackpad, which includes software support for an expanded set of gestures. Hopefully, Apple will be able to release these features for other modern MacBook models, too. In addition to the existing tap to click, double click to window drag, two finger scrolling, control + two finger zooming, and the two finger tap right click already available on today's MacBooks, the Air can also do:
a three fingered navigation swipe that works like a swipe on the iPhonea two finger object rotationa two finger pinch to zoom in and out
The MacBook Air's new Trackpad panel in System Preferences presents a video demo to indicate how the various gestures work. Each gesture can be disabled independently. Apple reps demonstrated some practical applications of the new gestures in a theater presentation (below).



A Sealed Ecosystem

Another factor in delivering the Air as a light, thin unit is the use of sealed components. There's no detachable battery, nor is there a special access door for RAM or a panel that can be removed in order to swap out the hard drive, as is the case with the MacBook. Apple reps on the floor described the unit as having no user serviceable parts. However, the entire back plate of the unit is held on by ten standard phillips screws, just like the original Titanium Powerbook. Remove the cover, and you should be able to drop everything out rather easily if you are so inclined. Apple didn't let us do that at the show, however, even when we asked politely.

That screwed on backplate suggests that the Air is really not so much more closed than other Apple laptops, and is probably easier to pull apart than the MacBook Pro (and certainly far easier than taking apart the old iBooks). As with the iPhone and iPods, users will need to supply power before traveling rather than hope to rely upon an assortment of spare batteries.

Given the increasing prohibition of additional external batteries on aircraft, it's not hard to see why Apple chose to use a thin, custom built Lithium Polymer battery behind a screwed on cover rather than building on weight and thickness to deliver a self contained battery unit and user accessible cover with a locking system like the other MacBook models. In a car or on a plane, a user should have access to power, and the 5 hour run time rating means that the Air should last long enough to be productive in between power sockets.

RAM and Disks

That leaves RAM and disk expansion as the big question marks. The Air ships with 2 GB of RAM, which is soldered onto the main logic board and can't be expanded. That's a reasonable amount for a mobile-centric laptop. It seems smart that Apple is shipping the Air with enough RAM to be very useful, as it has skimped in that area in the past to drive down the entry cost. Being stuck at 2GB of RAM will limit the high end use of the Air, but it's not a high end machine anyway, it's a mobile system.

The only other options available are processor speed and the disk drive. The $1799 base model includes a 1.6 GHz Core 2 Duo processor, 2GB RAM, 80 GB 4200 RPM PATA drive (MacBooks use SATA drives), 802.11n WiFi and Bluetooth.

Upgrading to a 1.8 GHz processor costs $300, and swapping in a solid state 64GB Flash RAM drive costs $999. The high cost of Flash will probably go down rapidly over the next two years, but users who want the fastest and most power efficient system have the pricey option of living on the bleeding edge of technology. Apple reps said the machines on display were all using a standard hard drive. It seemed very responsive. Upgrading to the high end SDD option should both increase the overall speed dramatically as well as allowing the system to coast along for longer, just as Flash based iPods long outlast hard drive models with similarly sized batteries.

The Envelope, Please

Apple presented commercials for the MacBook Air which show it being delivered in a manilla office envelope, pulled out seductively, and then opened up to display the familiar Leopard background (below).

Once Apple releases the new MacBook Air in February, AppleInsider will present a closer look at its new features.




post #2 of 187
Very nice machine if I were a rich businessman.

This just isn't a practical machine for most people on tight budgets.

Enjoy to those that can waste away the money!
post #3 of 187
I wonder if the battery will be a problem when flying!

The last time I traveled by air they asked everyone to remove the laptops batteries and put them in a different tray. How you are going to remove MacBook Air battery?!
post #4 of 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by NasserAE View Post

I wonder if the battery will be a problem when flying!

The last time I traveled by air they asked everyone to remove the laptops batteries and put them in a different tray. How you are going to remove MacBook Air battery?!

That was numbskulls going overboard, either because they can't read the regs or the regs were slopplily written. It caught some photographers too, I read stories where some TSA thug wanted to take away someone's alkaline batteries, which contains no lithium. Even most notebook batteries are below the FAA limit, you might have to have an Alienware class desknote to have a battery big enough to fit that class.

"Something in the Heir"?

I tried to figure out if there was a meaning I didn't catch, but this looks like a mistake.


Quote:
Article:
Given the increasing prohibition of additional external batteries on aircraft, it's not hard to see why Apple chose to use a thin, custom built Lithium Polymer battery behind a screwed on cover rather than building on weight and thickness to deliver a self contained battery unit and user accessible cover with a locking system like the other MacBook models.

That's one long run-on sentence. I really doubt Apple was intentionally following FAA regs, the lithium issue only came up very recently.
post #5 of 187
A refreshed MacBook Pro with the touchpad multi-touch gestures would be absolutely amazing...hopefully we don't have to wait until summer to see such a device.
post #6 of 187
That was before the lithium issue. They did not even look at labels. As I remember they had a sign at the security point asking everyone with a laptop to remove the battery and put it in a different tray (Don't ask me why) at JKF and DAL last summer.
post #7 of 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

"Something in the Heir"?

I tried to figure out if there was a meaning I didn't catch, but this looks like a mistake.

Besides the play on words for the tag line "Something in the air", the "heir" means successor or descendant.
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post #8 of 187
I'm curious about the speakers. Has anyone heard anything running through them... I assume those are tiny little speakers on either side of the iSight.

Also, how about fan noise and heat? Anyone rub a hand under one of those?
post #9 of 187
This battery is probably thin enough to be X-rayed. Those thick notebook batteries are dense enough to block the X-ray, from what I hear.
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post #10 of 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shogun View Post

I'm curious about the speakers. Has anyone heard anything running through them... I assume those are tiny little speakers on either side of the iSight.

Also, how about fan noise and heat? Anyone rub a hand under one of those?

I think that's "speaker". Singular. Mono sound is listed on the spec sheet. This isn't a portable Final Cut Pro device.

Also, none of the hotels I've stayed at recently have upgraded to wireless. They're all still on Ethernet. So effectively the price of this thing for most people should be assumed to be higher by the price of the Ethernet adapter.
post #11 of 187
Amazing someone can write an ostensibly cogent and well organized article and still be ostensibly batshit insane.
post #12 of 187
What a fiasco! All Apple needed to do was revamp the Macbook Pro line with blu-ray drives and hi def screens, add a 13" version and they would have sold like hot cakes. This has a very limited audience at this price- it should be sub $1,000 or not at all.
post #13 of 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by Booga View Post

Also, none of the hotels I've stayed at recently have upgraded to wireless. They're all still on Ethernet.

I have stayed in everything from 5-star hotels to roadside motels in the US and in a number of countries around the world. In the past couple of years, there is not one that I have stayed in anywhere in the world has not had wi-fi. Indeed, the cheaper the hotel, the cheaper (or essentially free) the wi-fi.

Yikes, what hotels are these that you stay in, in NJ?
post #14 of 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

What a fiasco! All Apple needed to do was revamp the Macbook Pro line with blu-ray drives and hi def screens, add a 13" version and they would have sold like hot cakes. This has a very limited audience at this price- it should be sub $1,000 or not at all.

What 'fiasco'?
post #15 of 187
Man you guys are nuts- I have been waiting a long time for a laptop with way less performance/features than the macbook for almost double the price. This is exactly what I was hoping for- a very thin macbook I could fit into an envelope, because I like to carry mine in an envelope- this is definitely worth almost double the price. Thanks Apple!
post #16 of 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Indeed, the cheaper the hotel, the cheaper (or essentially free) the wi-fi.

Ain't that the truth! Free, highspeed wifi from the biggest dives and nice hotels charge an arm and a leg per hour or 24 while giving you slow speeds.

Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

What 'fiasco'?

He is the new Wilco!
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post #17 of 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

I have stayed in everything from 5-star hotels to roadside motels in the US and in a number of countries around the world. In the past couple of years, there is not one that I have stayed in anywhere in the world has not had wi-fi. Indeed, the cheaper the hotel, the cheaper (or essentially free) the wi-fi.

Yikes, what hotels are these that you stay in, in NJ?

I travel 3-5 days a week. I get about 50/50 and stay in Hiltons and Marriotts primarily.

You are right, cheaper hotels have wifi often and it's usually free.

This raises an interesting problem. You've got the money to get an expensive secondary computer such as the Air. Likely you stay at nicer hotels. Usually the wifi (if available) isn't free. So now you are stuck paying $10-$20 a shot for that privilege.

Apple should have included an option to integrate AT&T, Verizon, an Sprint. Everyone else does that in their ultraportables.

I see the Air as a non-starter. It's sexy, it's just missing key features.
post #18 of 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

What a fiasco! All Apple needed to do was revamp the Macbook Pro line with blu-ray drives and hi def screens, add a 13" version and they would have sold like hot cakes. This has a very limited audience at this price- it should be sub $1,000 or not at all.

For the audience that AppleInsider represents, your reaction is probably quite typical. Even to the point of thinking of the MacBook Air as a glorified iPod Touch. However, it is going to look very, very cool on wireless networked boardroom desks. In some quarters it deserves to do well but in those quarters, the AU$4,338 that the top model costs where I live won't be an issue. For me though, the price is ridiculous.

Time Capsule however, will be hard to resist.
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post #19 of 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by tuneman07 View Post

Man you guys are nuts- I have been waiting a long time for a laptop with way less performance/features than the macbook for almost double the price. This is exactly what I was hoping for- a very thin macbook I could fit into an envelope, because I like to carry mine in an envelope- this is definitely worth almost double the price. Thanks Apple!

Well at least you can save money on the case. Envelopes are cheap.
post #20 of 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by -LD View Post

Apple should have included an option to integrate AT&T, Verizon, an Sprint. Everyone else does that in their ultraportables.

This is an ultralight, but not an ultraportable. Though I do wish it had an integrated HSDPA. This is the only feature that I could use in this machine that isn't included.
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post #21 of 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

This is an ultralight, but not an ultraportable. Though I do wish it had an integrated HSDPA. This is the only feature that I could use in this machine that isn't included.

As an ultralight it sucks though because you are stuck with only one way to connect. It's clearly meant to be very portable. Otherwise, what's the point of an ultralight? And as it's meant to be portable, the lack of any other connection method other than wifi is a huge. I don't think it needs an Ethernet port, but it does need an alternative method, such as a cell network.
post #22 of 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

If handling the merchandise is any prediction of sales, the MacBook Air should blow off the shelves in gale force winds.

Are you guys even trying anymore?
post #23 of 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by quinney View Post

Well at least you can save money on the case. Envelopes are cheap.

Yeah, but they don't have shoulder straps.
post #24 of 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by -LD View Post

This raises an interesting problem. You've got the money to get an expensive secondary computer such as the Air. Likely you stay at nicer hotels. Usually the wifi (if available) isn't free. So now you are stuck paying $10-$20 a shot for that privilege.

No, it does not.

Almost all of the time, my company (or that of others similar to mine) is paying. This would be even more so in the case of those who habitually stay in high-priced hotels.

(Btw - this is the truth - I stayed in a hotel in NYC a couple of months ago that charged $49.95 for a 24-hour internet connect. I won't mention its name. Despite the fact that someone else was picking up the tab, I felt outraged, and did not sign on. My iPhone (with Edge) saved the day!).
post #25 of 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lifino View Post

Yeah, but they don't have shoulder straps.

Duck tape is releasing a new brand, "Air Tape" specifically for that purpose!
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post #26 of 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fairly View Post

Amazing someone can write an ostensibly cogent and well organized article and still be ostensibly batshit insane.

can someone explain what the hell this person is talking about? \
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post #27 of 187
So, the 1.8" drives seem snappy enough for standard use, thats good to hear. But what about their life expectancy? I'll admit that I haven't kept up on the latest news, but I know that previously those 1.8" drives weren't suited to the type of intense read/write sessions you'd expect from a system drive. I think a novel solution would have been to include 8-10Gb of standard NAND flash built in for use as virtual memory and as a holding pen before large chunks of data get written or read from the HDD.

Just my thoughts, but I think a system with both types of storage would have been a boon for this type of implementation.
post #28 of 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by trevorlsciact View Post

can someone explain what the hell this person is talking about? \



Lots of people have tried in the past. And, given up.

(I suggest the archeological dig of "Find more posts by....." against his name if you want to get a good feel for it).
post #29 of 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

This is an ultralight, but not an ultraportable..

Like why would you make something utralight if it wasn't utraportable. What have you been smoking?
post #30 of 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

No, it does not.

Almost all of the time, my company (or that of others similar to mine) is paying. This would be even more so in the case of those who habitually stay in high-priced hotels.

(Btw - this is the truth - I stayed in a hotel in NYC a couple of months ago that charged $49.95 for a 24-hour internet connect. I won't mention its name. Despite the fact that someone else was picking up the tab, I felt outraged, and did not sign on. My iPhone (with Edge) saved the day!).

Your company will buy you the Air as well?

Sounds like a hell of a company. They hiring?
post #31 of 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

"Something in the Heir"?

I tried to figure out if there was a meaning I didn't catch, but this looks like a mistake.

I agree. It would have made sense if this was the headline to the discussion of the Powerbook Duo, however the discussion it actually headlined had no obvious connection to "heir" at all.


Regarding the Air, even if it doesn't prove to be a success, it will be good to see the new touch pad in the macbook/pro lines, and perhaps a backlit keyboard in the macbook.

Regarding the new touch pad, it would be good if the gestures were customizable. I would prefer to map the three finger swipe to move between tabs in safari. It will be interesting to see if such remapping is standard, or at least hackable. Fingers crossed.
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post #32 of 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fairly View Post

Amazing someone can write an ostensibly cogent and well organized article and still be ostensibly batshit insane.

For anyone who didn't know what Ostensible meant, including myself and the author of the quote...
Ostensible = stating or appearing to be true, but not necessarily so.
post #33 of 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

I have stayed in everything from 5-star hotels to roadside motels in the US and in a number of countries around the world. In the past couple of years, there is not one that I have stayed in anywhere in the world has not had wi-fi. Indeed, the cheaper the hotel, the cheaper (or essentially free) the wi-fi.

Yikes, what hotels are these that you stay in, in NJ?

I spend about half the year in hotels, most of them good, and while almost all have wireless, their service, 90% of the time, does not encompass the entire hotel. Usually the lobby, plus maybe the first 3 floors, and if I'm lucky maybe one of the conference rooms. In fact, I'm at the Radisson in Chennai right now, using Ethernet from the 6th floor because I don't want to sit in the lobby to use WiFi. I think it was after the 5th ethernet cable I bought so i could be online from a hotel room that realized that I could take hotels' Wifi claims with a grain of salt.
post #34 of 187
MacBookAir=Zzz

I guess if you want to pay $2,000 USD (including tax) for the reduction of 2lbs then all the power to ya because other than that there's nothing else worth talking about. If it was 10" ultra portable it woulda been worth it.
post #35 of 187
I just don't understand why the MBA doesn't match the competition in size/weight. Again, a Toshiba R500 is 11.1 x 8.5 x 0.77 and 2.375 lbs. Now the R500 is 12inch screen, but includes an optical drive and a ton of ports. Longer battery life and the battery is removable.

How significant is a .74inch MBA over a 0.77 Toshiba that is lighter by 8 ounces (1/6th lighter) and narrower by 1.7 inches. Again, 0.77inches with a removable battery.

They also have a 1.74lb version without the optical drive, an SSD and a smaller battery.

Review here:
http://www.ruggedpcreview.com/3_note...hiba_r500.html

Note the apple is cheaper, has 2gig of ram, and faster processor. Naturally a wonderful operating system with Apple. But Toshiba has a larger HDD or the same SSD.

Similarly, it has been like 4 years since the PB 12inch.

In that period we have saved 1.6 lbs with a bit larger of a screen, but no optical drive, no removable battery, many fewer ports.

Wouldn't a PB 12inch with the only change being an LED screen go down to like 4lbs? It would also be say 0.8 or 0.9 inches thick.

So all that engineering and 4 years of advances saved us 1lb and a touch of thickness at the price of more width and length (again if you exclude the LED).

Underwhelmed. I'll probably still buy as I want something light with Mac OS. But this is not terribly impressive.
post #36 of 187
My 12" PowerBook G4 is probably the best piece of technology I've ever purchased; I travel extensively with it, and it's just perfect. I can watch DVDs in the middle of the Australian outback, I have 3 spare batteries for long flights (not originating in the US), and I've got a huge hard disk in it for all my photos and movies. All I want is the same form factor, same ports and options, but with a modern Intel processor. I had high hopes for the next generation Apple notebook, but the Air isn't quite right for my needs. Am I that unusual?
post #37 of 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Like why would you make something utralight if it wasn't utraportable. What have you been smoking?


He's been smoking nothing (which is fortunate or unfortunate, depending on your POV ). The MB Air has the same footprint as the regular ol' Plain Jane MacBook.

So it really isn't an 'ultraportable'... more like a very light and thin MacBook, with 'teh sexay' turned up a notch. Daddy likes, but an ultraportable it ain't.

.
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post #38 of 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider

If handling the merchandise is any prediction of sales, the MacBook Air should blow off the shelves in gale force winds.


Quote:
Originally Posted by wilco View Post

Are you guys even trying anymore?


ROFLMAO! Flawless victory by Wilco. Finish him!

.
Cut-copy-paste, MMS, landscape keyboard, video-recording, voice-calling, and more... FINALLY
To the 'We Didn't Need It' Crowd/Apple Apologista Squad : Wrong again, lol
Thanks for listening to your...
Reply
Cut-copy-paste, MMS, landscape keyboard, video-recording, voice-calling, and more... FINALLY
To the 'We Didn't Need It' Crowd/Apple Apologista Squad : Wrong again, lol
Thanks for listening to your...
Reply
post #39 of 187
The MacBook Air is awesome, fabulous, sexy, thin, light, and innovative in most ways.
Only 2GB RAM, only 80GB HD, or the shameless $999 for a smaller solid state HD.
Beautiful, Underpowered, Overpriced.
Apple will soon be reliving the Cube days.
post #40 of 187
This will be great for many non-media professionals, and of course kids with rich parents who want to look cool.

Besides the fact that I wouldn't by it because it can't be used as part of a mobile studio, I think a lot of people will be turned off by the fact that they can't burn/rip CDs on it while travelling, can't swap the battery while travelling (very important on flights to those non-media professionals who can't afford first class), can't connect to ethernet networks, etc. etc.

To get basic functionality, one must spend a bunch of extra money on external drives, hubs, ethernet adapters, etc. etc., which results in the same sized package as a MacBook (still with less power and battery issues).

Meanwhile, Sony and Toshiba have similarly priced true sub-notebooks with the above features included....

But Kudos on the style front, Apple.

Speaking of which, does the fact that the bottom isn't flat mean that the notebook will tip all over the place when i rest my hands on the edge?
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