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MacBook Air's processor riddle solved - Page 3

post #81 of 91
A 1.6 or 1.8Ghz, a lot of people are concerned about the speed differences between MacBook and MBP users.

I am sure a simple way is for Apple to release a firmware update that will "bump" up the clock to 2.2Ghz or 2.4Ghz when plugged in. This would mean corresponding fan speed adjustments. Its easy to do. And I don't understand WHY apple did not do this on Day One!.

Are they "forcing" people to accept the compromises by being conservative ?. Maybe. I cant help but think they should have done more in terms of the hardware itself rather than hyping on design and thinness.\
MBP 2.4UB 500HD , MBA Gen1 1.6/80HD MB 2.2SR 250HD PB 1.67 160HD iPhones Gen1 8G4G
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MBP 2.4UB 500HD , MBA Gen1 1.6/80HD MB 2.2SR 250HD PB 1.67 160HD iPhones Gen1 8G4G
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post #82 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nano2Gfteo View Post

A 1.6 or 1.8Ghz, a lot of people are concerned about the speed differences between MacBook and MBP users.

I am sure a simple way is for Apple to release a firmware update that will "bump" up the clock to 2.2Ghz or 2.4Ghz when plugged in. This would mean corresponding fan speed adjustments. Its easy to do. And I don't understand WHY apple did not do this on Day One!.

Are they "forcing" people to accept the compromises by being conservative ?. Maybe. I cant help but think they should have done more in terms of the hardware itself rather than hyping on design and thinness.\

The processor is already plenty fast for a 3lb machine. Most are barely over 1GHz.
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post #83 of 91
Quote:
I am sure a simple way is for Apple to release a firmware update that will "bump" up the clock

"Naw, Son, that ain't the way we roll, up in here", said Mr. Jobs.

1. It won't work
2. It's illegal
3. It violates their contract with Intel

Other than that, there's nothing wrong with it.
--Johnny
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--Johnny
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post #84 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by lundy View Post

"Naw, Son, that ain't the way we roll, up in here", said Mr. Jobs.

1. It won't work
2. It's illegal
3. It violates their contract with Intel

Other than that, there's nothing wrong with it.

Why is it illegal? Does it have to do with their contract with Intel?
post #85 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by jagger27 View Post

Why is it illegal? Does it have to do with their contract with Intel?

Legal or illegal, over-clocking increases power usage at a much higher rate than it increases processing power. I don't know why this was even asked about a portable that is meant to last 5+ hours on one charge.
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post #86 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by lundy View Post

"Naw, Son, that ain't the way we roll, up in here", said Mr. Jobs.

1. It won't work
2. It's illegal
3. It violates their contract with Intel

Other than that, there's nothing wrong with it.

I doubt overclocking is illegal. A spec like that isn't enforced by law, no one's gone to jail or been prosecuted for overclocking a chip, it's just a rated spec, not the law.

Increasing functionality after purchase isn't illegal either, the only thing I can think of is accounting.

But it was a silly question, it's not as if Apple was "holding out"
post #87 of 91
Well, of course it's a silly question - when Intel released the processors, they certified them by the speed that they "didn't fail" at.

So Apple is advertising that they are selling genuine Intel chips, which implies certified by Intel. If it were possible to alter the firmware to change the processor clock speed (and I am not sure that it is), then Apple is selling an overclocked chip, not a genuine Intel chip as advertised.

They'd be in trouble for fraud, Intel would sue them for not only breaking the contract but damaging Intel's name, and they'd have no way of knowing whether any particular chip even could be overclocked, so such a program wouldn't work. And in any case, it could not be overclocked as much as the OP suggested.
--Johnny
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--Johnny
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post #88 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nano2Gfteo View Post

A 1.6 or 1.8Ghz, a lot of people are concerned about the speed differences between MacBook and MBP users.

I am sure a simple way is for Apple to release a firmware update that will "bump" up the clock to 2.2Ghz or 2.4Ghz when plugged in. This would mean corresponding fan speed adjustments. Its easy to do. And I don't understand WHY apple did not do this on Day One!.

Are they "forcing" people to accept the compromises by being conservative ?. Maybe. I cant help but think they should have done more in terms of the hardware itself rather than hyping on design and thinness.\

I'm glad you don't design MacBooks for a living. You could get a job writing fairy tales though.

Don't you think Apple would do this from day one if it could? Do you think there might be some technical issues involved? No, its not illegal, immoral or breaks a contract. There is no vast conspiracy.

The reasons are (1) heat and (2) reliability.

If the processor generates more heat you have to dissipate it, through the case and with a larger fan. This ultimately means you have to have a bigger and heavier machine. Overclocking the processor means that it will not be reliable, ie it will not work some or all of the time. Its still an Intel chip, it just won't always work. There is a reason processors are given speeds and that is because they will only run at that speed at a given temperature.

This is the best idea since someone suggested Apple would upgrade the iPhone to 3G via software.
post #89 of 91
Usually I'd say this is a pretty pointless comparison but since there are so many people on these forums that don't seem to understand how small and slower can be more expensive perhaps this comparison from ULV C2D to LV C2D to C2D (and Turion) processors will shed some light.
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post #90 of 91
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #91 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Booga View Post

I would recommend carrying an Airport Express around.

When an Airport Express weighs the same as the USB-to-Ethernet adaptor, I'll carry one around.

Quote:
Originally Posted by merdhead View Post

For practical purposes it's no smaller than a MacBook in situations where it matters - a cramped seat, a small carry-on. The reduced weight and volume are nice, but the old 12" still beats this hands down.

Apple compromised the size and weight in order to make it as thin as possible. I wish Apple had compromised a bit on thickness to reduce weight and overall size.

For me, the question is whether or not it's time to replace my 1.5MHz 12" PowerBook. The advantages are 30% less weight, 30% more pixels, better battery life, better wifi reception, and better performance due to 2GB vs 1.25GB of ram and a more advanced processor. The disadvantages, for me, are the price, the need for a USB-to-Ethernet adaptor when I'm on the road, and the larger footprint. I prefer the form factor of my 12" PowerBook. I don't care at all about the optical drive, as I've never used the optical drive on the road in the three years I've had by PowerBook. I also don't care about the thickness or the cool factor.
Mac user since August 1983.
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Mac user since August 1983.
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