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Gartner: Apple to claim over 12% of US PC market by 2011

post #1 of 55
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Apple Inc. will see its share of the US personal computer market increase twofold over the next three years from 6.1 percent to over 12 percent, according Gartner.

The market research firm made the assumption as part of a report issued Thursday titled "Key Predictions for IT Organisations and Users in 2008 and Beyond." It similarly predicts that Apple will also double its share in Western Europe.

"Apple's gains in computer market share reflect as much on the failures of the rest of the industry as on Apple's success," Gartner said in the report. "Apple is challenging its competitors with software integration that provides ease of use and flexibility; continuous and more frequent innovation in hardware and software; and an ecosystem that focuses on interoperability across multiple devices (such as iPod and iMac cross-selling)."

Some of the other predictions outlined in the firm's report include:
By 2012, 50 per cent of traveling workers will leave their notebooks at home in favour of other devices.By 2012, 80 per cent of all commercial software will include elements of open-source technology.By 2012, at least one-third of business application software spending will be as service subscription instead of as product license.By 2011, early technology adopters will forgo capital expenditures and instead purchase 40 per cent of their IT infrastructure as a service.By 2009, more than one third of IT organizations will have one or more environmental criteria in their top six buying criteria for IT-related goods.By 2010, 75 per cent of organisations will use full life cycle energy and CO2 footprint as mandatory PC hardware buying criteria.By 2011, suppliers to large global enterprises will need to prove their green credentials via an audited process to retain preferred supplier status.By 2010, end-user preferences will decide as much as half of all software, hardware and services acquisitions made by IT.Through 2011, the number of 3-D printers in homes and businesses will grow 100-fold over 2006 levels.
post #2 of 55
Can somebody say switchers
post #3 of 55
What's Apple's product quadrant going to look like then?
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post #4 of 55
I certainly believe it, it sounds fair, however I honestly think they might have more market share by then. MS screwed up big-time with Vista, people also constantly grumble about the shortcomings and idiosyncrasies of PCs. The Mac maker will return to having majority market share, unless something crazy happens like Ubuntu takes off.

Apple understands the market, but most important of all, it really gets its customers. Thats where the difference lies. For example, Sony envies the artistic + extremely functional aspects of the Macbook, so what do they do? They tack on so-called "artsy" designs to the backs of their already existing lines of notebooks and thing that people will dump their MBs and MBPs and flock because all of a sudden "Sony gets it!". Thats not getting it, thats a desperate attempt at imitation.

Bottom line is, consumers aren't stupid these days like they once were. They are well informed and they will not let certain companies force their products onto them. Consumers like options, not too many, but stable options. Case in point, people don't "buy" Vista or XP, it is forced onto them when they purchase a Dell or and HP. On the other hand, people who buy Macs buy them because they truly want a Mac!
post #5 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdotdubz View Post

Consumers like options, not too many, but stable options.

Customers like to have the option of options but tend to be confused by them. Most people rely on computers but still know nothing about them. It's still too common to here the harddrvie, CPU, motherboard, and RAM easily interchanged when something is actually talking about the harddrive, CPU, motherboard or RAM.

Using Dells website for ordering is a daunting task compared to the ease of use to Apple's Online Store. But there will always be a divide between those who want the perception of control and those who want simplicity. I'm glad we live in a society that allows all aspects to be represented.
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post #6 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

What's Apple's product quadrant going to look like then?

A hypercube! You'll have to start studying String Theory in order to grasp all of the dimensions. There will be the following axes:
  • Pocket-Laptop-Desktop (maybe) - Server
  • Entry-level - Consumer - Prosumer - Pro - Institutional
  • Flash-based - Hard-Drive-based
  • Other aspects we haven't dreamed up yet!

I can't wait to see Apple get into the 12% marketshare, because I think that is getting pretty close to Mac's optimal figure. Wouldn't you think that the optimal marketshare is 100%? I think it is a lot less because Apple engages in all kinds of anti-competitive and monopolistic practices, but with such a small market share, complainers are told that they do have a choice: the majority OS. Now, we long-time Mac users actually buy into the Apple monopoly because we like the integration of hardware, software and OS. Practically speaking, it makes using a Mac much nicer and smoother to use.

If Apple starts to gain really big market share numbers, anti-trust regulators might start giving them some trouble. Look at how many problems they've had, especially in Europe, with the highly successful iPod/iTunes combo.

My totally subjective optimal marketshare for the Mac is in the 15-20% range. That's big enough that no developer or peripheral maker can ignore our platform, yet we avoid to regulatory hassles that might make us as mediocre as the Microsoft world.

And, by the way, that claim about 3D printers is whack. I talked to a local print shop that has one and they are having a hard time keeping it busy enough to justify its on-going existence. I worked for one engineering company who gave theirs away for lack of use, but I worked for another where it got used pretty regularly. My view is that people are going to be pretty disappointed by the quality of their printed parts to gain that kind of widespread appeal. I wish it were true, but I don't see the 100-fold increase happening.
post #7 of 55
I believe that Apple will double its market share by the end of 2009 or, at the latest, mid 2010.

The writing's on the wall.
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post #8 of 55
Wow, I just looked up 3D printing... sick stuff! I didn't know the final products were FULLY FUNCTIONAL!

I watched this video and was amazed!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4qiU...eature=related

Also these two (the second video made me a believer!):
ww.youtube.com/watch?v=S7noXI530RU&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qwSxU...eature=related
post #9 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Customers like to have the option of options but tend to be confused by them. Most people rely on computers but still know nothing about them. It's still too common to here the harddrvie, CPU, motherboard, and RAM easily interchanged when something is actually talking about the harddrive, CPU, motherboard or RAM.

Using Dells website for ordering is a daunting task compared to the ease of use to Apple's Online Store. But there will always be a divide between those who want the perception of control and those who want simplicity. I'm glad we live in a society that allows all aspects to be represented.

Give me the market that wants simplicity and usability, and you can have the market of tweekers and DYI-ers.
See you at the bank... me depositing.
post #10 of 55
Unless Apple introduces a headless desktop that fits between the Mac Mini and the Mac Pro, this is not happening. Apple needs a $500 headless desktop with full feature set to win any significant share of enterprise business...
post #11 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdotdubz View Post

Wow, I just looked up 3D printing... sick stuff! I didn't know the final products were FULLY FUNCTIONAL!

I watched this video and was amazed!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4qiU...eature=related

Also these two (the second video made me a believer!):
ww.youtube.com/watch?v=S7noXI530RU&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qwSxU...eature=related

Just what the world needs... mass 'printing' of more junk to be disposed.
post #12 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by amac4me View Post

Can somebody say switchers

I was going to link to the youtube Mac switch ad of "switcher" Ellen Fleiss and then I thought, "Huh". People would post nasty comments that would have to be "beep, beep, beep ,beep" censored out.

So, I decided not to add my warp sense of humor to my reply to this post and not link to Ellen and to give it a rest!

See, I do have a heart!\

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post #13 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQB View Post

Give me the market that wants simplicity and usability, and you can have the market of tweekers and DYI-ers.
See you at the bank... me depositing.

I'll be depositing too. Being a simpleton, I'm heavily invested in companies that strive for simplicity.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post

I was going to link to the youtube Mac switch ad of "switcher" Ellen Fleiss and then I thought, "Huh". People would post nasty comments that would have to be "beep, beep, beep ,beep" censored out.

What's the del with Ellen Fleiss?
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post #14 of 55
3D printing is amazing technology, but its for modeling, it's NOT fully functional yet... "Earl grey tea, hot." "Mr. Data, are you fully functional?"
post #15 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I'll be depositing too. Being a simpleton, I'm heavily invested in companies that strive for simplicity.

That was the generic "you'.
post #16 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by macshark View Post

Unless Apple introduces a headless desktop that fits between the Mac Mini and the Mac Pro, this is not happening. Apple needs a $500 headless desktop with full feature set to win any significant share of enterprise business...

Actually, I think that an "xMac" will be introduced...but it won't be an xMac per se. I think the Mac Mini will shrink more in size, and that with this shrinkage, it will allow perhaps for small expansion slot in the back. It might be called a Mac Nano or who else knows, but the point is, that will satisfy all those who want expandability. I also think Apple TV and Mac Mini will eventually converge to become one product, however there will be two versions: AppleTV (entertainment/consumer) and Mac Mini (more powerfull, home computing/enterprise).

But honestly, who needs a headless mac, either buy a Pro, or buy a Mac Mini. Mac Mini is small enough where you can connect all sorts of cool stuff under it and its still smaller than any PC footprint. Maybe someone should make some sort of Mac Mini Expansion Dock, where you can plug in all the PCI slots you want.

And why does enterprise need a headless desktop? Most of them only use word processing, spreadsheets and some other apps. Mac Mini is more than enough for that. All the more hardcore stuff calls for Mac Pro. I think Apple has it covered.

I am planning on opening an office soon and I will be exclusively using Mac Minis, and they will be far better than the Dell & HP crap boxes at my current workplace. Also, our office will be elegant and will just work right, instead of constant calls to IT support for all sorts of messes.

Simplicity. Ockam's Razor. It always wins.

Simple, yet powerful. Simple, yet elegant. Apple.
post #17 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdotdubz View Post

I certainly believe it, it sounds fair, however I honestly think they might have more market share by then. MS screwed up big-time with Vista, people also constantly grumble about the shortcomings and idiosyncrasies of PCs. The Mac maker will return to having majority market share, unless something crazy happens like Ubuntu takes off.

Apple understands the market, but most important of all, it really gets its customers. Thats where the difference lies. For example, Sony envies the artistic + extremely functional aspects of the Macbook, so what do they do? They tack on so-called "artsy" designs to the backs of their already existing lines of notebooks and thing that people will dump their MBs and MBPs and flock because all of a sudden "Sony gets it!". Thats not getting it, thats a desperate attempt at imitation.

Bottom line is, consumers aren't stupid these days like they once were. They are well informed and they will not let certain companies force their products onto them. Consumers like options, not too many, but stable options. Case in point, people don't "buy" Vista or XP, it is forced onto them when they purchase a Dell or and HP. On the other hand, people who buy Macs buy them because they truly want a Mac!

I don't know if I would say other companies force their products on people. If anything Apple does this more- you have zero options when buying a Mac laptop compared to something like Dell. I can get a Dell in any size I want with any options on each of them. This has been a major sticking point in my decision to buy a Mac- Its tough to pay so much more when other companies offer you so many more options.
post #18 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by tuneman07 View Post

Its tough to pay so much more when other companies offer you so many more options.

I got my sister a Dell a few years ago. I had tons of choices. Honestly, it was a pain in the a$$ for me to decide what to get her. I did not know much about Dell's product line, and I found the array of choices mildly bewildering. Maybe I saved some money for the specs I got her, though, I don't remember. It surely had great benchmark specs compared to the Macs available at the time. I do know that she hates using it and can sometimes be found at my mother's iBook.

Did I pay less for the computer I bought? Probably.
Was the actual end result a waste of money? Definately.
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post #19 of 55
Did you check out NetApplications market share trends? Mac share is skyrocketing. Did you check out ChangeWave surveys? They say that the number of consumers (not businesses tho) wanting to buy Macs is going up fast, and it already exceeded 30%. That number is going to keep going up, and it a couple years, I can expect the market for mac to match 30%, especially if Microsoft leaves consumers with Vista until then.
post #20 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by tuneman07 View Post

I don't know if I would say other companies force their products on people. If anything Apple does this more- you have zero options when buying a Mac laptop compared to something like Dell. I can get a Dell in any size I want with any options on each of them. This has been a major sticking point in my decision to buy a Mac- Its tough to pay so much more when other companies offer you so many more options.

Sounds like you prefer the Dell product then.
Enjoy!

The point is that Apple isn't 'restricting' anyone's choices. A small small subset of users want to Tim Allen their computers, and for them, enjoy that great big Windows, Linux etc world.
Plenty of choices abound.

But quit griping that a company that has a specific (and enormous) target audience is somehow 'forcing' something on you.
post #21 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdotdubz View Post

Wow, I just looked up 3D printing... sick stuff! I didn't know the final products were FULLY FUNCTIONAL!

I watched this video and was amazed!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4qiU...eature=related

Also these two (the second video made me a believer!):
ww.youtube.com/watch?v=S7noXI530RU&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qwSxU...eature=related

I've been watching the Rapid Prototyping industry for years. I've been waiting for the day when we could have one in our homes! This is going to revolutionize the inventing process. The day is coming when the common man will be able to create a 3D prototype on his home computer, then turn around and actually create a single working model. How cool is that?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rapid_prototyping

$5000 to $1000 in 4 years
http://www.engadget.com/2007/05/08/d...5k-3d-printer/
post #22 of 55
I wish there were a market survey that could accurately gauge consumer (home, small office) use.

My impression is that the Mac is making headway in this space much faster than aggregate PC sales suggests, which is heavily skewed by large scale corporate purchasing of cheap, relatively low powered boxes.

Not that that's not for real market share, just that it would be extremely significant if Apple were capturing, say 15% or 20% of the home market at some point, even as all over sales remained under 10%.

By extremely significant, I mean that it would have a huge effect on developers and service and content providers and give us a better picture of the health and growth potential of Apple's ecosystem-- the iMac/Apple TV/iPod/iTMS/wireless media strategy.

If I knew that double digit significant numbers of my target market were using Macs, I would think long and hard about taking my sweet time in rolling out services for the platform, or porting or updating my app for the Mac.

I have no idea if Apple is making huge strides in this area, of course, but I would be willing to bet their numbers are way better if you factor out corporate purchasing.
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post #23 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by tuneman07 View Post

I don't know if I would say other companies force their products on people. If anything Apple does this more- you have zero options when buying a Mac laptop compared to something like Dell. I can get a Dell in any size I want with any options on each of them. This has been a major sticking point in my decision to buy a Mac- Its tough to pay so much more when other companies offer you so many more options.

Thats the thing. People do have a choice between who they buy their PC from, Dell, HP, whatever... but they are quite literally forced to use Windows by default. Recently Dell has offered Ubuntu and I think that was in the public negative response to Vista. Until people spoke up and told Dell that they don't want Vista "forced" onto them when they buy a PC, there was no choice. No you can get Vista or XP.

With Macs its different. You can buy the Mac and Run OSX, its default system, but you have the flexibility to run Windows too. People aren't "locked out" of the option to use Windows when they buy a Mac, which is a genius idea within itself!

There are so many people that buy PCs and have windows "forced" onto them unknowingly, many of them never knowing about other options. An example, my uncle, 50 years old, does not have the slightest clue about computers: He purchased a HP laptop, had no clue what windows was and never really heard of OSX until he came to my house to ask me some questions and asked me why my "Vista" looked to nice when he saw my iMac, lol. It was cute actually, he thought my OSX was a windows product. Thats where the problem lies, there are so many people around the world that have had Windows forced onto them for so long that they believe its some kind of "standard", like there is no other choice. My uncle, example, had no clue there were other things out there, he thought all computers run windows, that it was some kind of standard or something.

Another example, my cousin from Europe. He had heard of iPods, and in Europe they are of iconic status, but he really didn't know Apple makes computers or their own OS! He was bedazzled by my iMac and actually saved up money to buy a Macbook Pro after his experience. He was literally "taught" that Windows is the end-all, be-all, and that there are no other option. Keep in mind thought, that Windows and Windows apps are heavily pirated around the world. This explains the huge market share, because alot of Win stuff is available for free or cheap (though it pirated), even Windows itself! Half the people I know who run windows run a pirated version or just borrowed a install disc from a friend.

I think the market is beginning to respond to this, thus the HUGE SURGE in Mac market share! People are beginning to know there is something better out there!

And about Mac having "limited options", they don't. They just get rid of excess useless option to simplify the buying process. Sure, you can taylor a cheapo Dell with the bare minumum and $$$ave but you are getting what you paid for: A bare minimum machine that is not worth the pricetag and will be completely obsolete in a year or so. If you price out a Mac and a competitor accordingly with same options, you will see the Mac is the better value, as it 90% of the time comes out cheaper, plus you have to factor in that Apple included really great software with iLife for free. Your sister's purchase is like comparing a Kia and a Lexus, if you wanna do a correct comparison, compare a Benz to a Lexus: Grab a high end Dell XPS and compare it to a Mac product, or spec out a dell.

Maybe you should have got your sister a Mac Mini with a copy of parallels.
post #24 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by tmedia1 View Post

3D printing is amazing technology, but its for modeling, it's NOT fully functional yet... "Earl grey tea, hot." "Mr. Data, are you fully functional?"

The smaller 3D printers using plastics may not be, but there are Rapid Prototyping machines that are producing metal and metal/plastic combo products that have actually been used in real world situations. I've read a number of articles and discussed this subject with those attending classes on the products and it would blow most peoples minds what they are doing. Granted these machines are not easily obtained by us mere mortals.

http://www.cc.utah.edu/~asn8200/rapid.html

One of the coolest concepts is that one day we would have a 3D printer that could actually self-replicate its own parts.
post #25 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

What's Apple's product quadrant going to look like then?

Though products could be named differently, I'd like to take a guess:
  • iPod shuffle
  • iPod nano (touch)
  • iPod touch
  • iPod classic
  • Mac touch (tablet)
  • MacBook (13", 15", 17", configurable, colors)
  • iMac (20", 24" 30")
  • Cinema Displays (iSight, mic, 20", 27", 33")
  • iPhone
  • iPhone nano
  • Apple HiFi 2 (with screen & hard drive)
  • Apple Car radio
  • Time Capsule
  • Mac Pro
  • Mac nano (Mac mini or steroids - this product may not appear though)
  • Apple TV
  • Apple tele (37" + 50" with optional iTunes subscription)
  • Xserve
  • Xserve mini
  • iDildo :P
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post #26 of 55
Being that the vast majority of PC sales go to businesses that buy as cheap as they can and need only to conform to the Windows business interconnectivity that their IT groups have established, Apple has been shut out (to date) of the "total PC market-share" game. That is probably changing...

Consumers used to buy Windows PCs as a matter of course, sometimes due to their growing familiarity with their first PC operating system, but often because they could pirate software from work easily rather than buy it. Now they can even get by with internet applications for tasks that used to require Office-esque software suites. The proliferation of corporate laptops took a bite out of consumer sales numbers, but companies got hosed over and over by users taking them home and loading AOL, Quicken and games on them, frequently messing up stock business configurations and lowering productivity.

Now companies have much stricter admin control on IT assets. Software and updates are pushed over the company network to computers, and in some cases, users can't even change their screen saver configurations or desktop wallpaper, let alone borrow installation disks or CDs.

As home users need to maintain their own PCs (many of them discount, low-end models) OS health and application support, the intricacies of PC management starts to become overwhelming to the basic home user, and even more advanced ones. The halo effect of iTunes and the iPod starts making people look at Apple computers differently. Maybe the IT support specialist used to refer to them as "toy computers" a while back, but now he/she is more likely to admit they got one for Mom and Dad, or even themselves.

Companies no longer take the CIOs MS-dictated "stay the course" plan as inevitable. Many companies embrace Six Sigma and Kaizen principles and practices at all levels of business, and they no longer blindly accept that the corporate IT department is doing all it can to make personal computing and information management better. Microsoft's overly complex Windows licensing hasn't endeared them to the very people who were their strongest proponents.

I expect that Apple's overall PC market-share will go as high as they want it to. I'm not at all convinced it has ever been their goal to dominate the total PC market. It's similar to why Bentley, Bugatti and Ferrari don't make a car to compete with Toyotas. It's not in their best interest, and they simply don't have to in order to succeed.
post #27 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdotdubz View Post

Thats the thing. People do have a choice between who they buy their PC from, Dell, HP, whatever... but they are quite literally forced to use Windows by default. Recently Dell has offered Ubuntu and I think that was in the public negative response to Vista. Until people spoke up and told Dell that they don't want Vista "forced" onto them when they buy a PC, there was no choice. No you can get Vista or XP.

With Macs its different. You can buy the Mac and Run OSX, its default system, but you have the flexibility to run Windows too. People aren't "locked out" of the option to use Windows when they buy a Mac, which is a genius idea within itself!

The next logical step is to ask yourself which party is responsible for the PC's lacking ability to run Mac OS.
post #28 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

What's Apple's product quadrant going to look like then?

The Mac division arguably no longer has a "quadrant" in terms of organizing its product offerings.

Consumer notebook: MacBook
Consumer desktop: iMac
Consumer desktop: Mac Mini
Pro notebook: MacBook Pro
Pro desktop: Mac Pro
Pro server: Xserve
Not easily categorized: MacBook Air.

it's used to be a quadrant with the iBook, iMac, PowerBook, PowerMac/Server.
post #29 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by cameronj View Post

The next logical step is to ask yourself which party is responsible for the PC's lacking ability to run Mac OS.

Nothing would tarnish Apple's reputation faster than that.
Apple sells quality of experience, and the fact that OSX and Apple hardware are joined at the hip is what is responsible for that.
post #30 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQB View Post

Nothing would tarnish Apple's reputation faster than that.
Apple sells quality of experience, and the fact that OSX and Apple hardware are joined at the hip is what is responsible for that.

Of course! But the post to which I replied implied that somehow Apples were superior because they gave you choices that PC makers didn't, when in fact it's Apple that forces that situation.
post #31 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by lantzn View Post

One of the coolest concepts is that one day we would have a 3D printer that could actually self-replicate its own parts.

That day arrived a long time ago. A milling machine is capable of self-replicating all of its own parts, theoretically, although some parts would be made much better and faster on a lathe.

I seriously doubt that any individual will be able to keep a 3D printer busy. The next logical step is pretty obvious to me: people will send their STL files to the local print shop and pay them to have it done. Here in Houston, I was quoted a rate of $30-35 per cubic inch of model material used (the support material in this process is reclaimed and we customers don't pay for it explicitly.) I have something that is basically a six-inch diameter disk that, when hollowed, came out to about 4 cu. in. or about the $120-150 range. Unless I need to build lots of them, I don't think I could justify buying a machine instead of paying my local print shop.

Given the outrageous price of dumb ol' 2D printer ink, I can't see the sellers of 3D printer consumables being any less greedy. Notice that all of the drug stores, photo stores and big-box retailers are still doing a lot of business printing your color photos for you, even though the technology to print them at home has been affordable for at least a decade (the printing machines, that is, it's the cost of the paper and ink that keep the stores in business.)

Individuals won't be owning these things for a long time, but I sure would be happy to see more and more services pop up that could provide more options to those of use who would like to use them.
post #32 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by cameronj View Post

Of course! But the post to which I replied implied that somehow Apples were superior because they gave you choices that PC makers didn't, when in fact it's Apple that forces that situation.

gotcha.
post #33 of 55
Yet another example of the "pump and dump" strategy at work. This time predicting the future.

My prediction is that the number of foolish people will increase by 5%, that 10% of those will write reports predicting the future, another 30% will be working in web 2.0 start-ups that net out a return to their sweat equity at $2.35 an hour, less than a days page on an Indonesian assembly line, and another 10% will develop an allergy to math. There will be a corresponding migration of laptops to commuter trains, but when the market collapses there will be 40% more elbow room, allowing 15" screens to become the norm instead of 13". Apple is already planning to get ready to take advantage of this unprecedented opportunity by ordering shipping containers. This will have a negative effect on the corrugated container market resulting in depressed sales and high prices. As a result, Apple will build a manufacturing plant is the USA, staff it with unemployed Americans, and export all their laptops to China where there are jobs and trains. Apple stock will go through the roof, but it will all be owned by three sheiks in Saudi Arabia.

Dell will then come out with a $200 laptop, and Apple will collapse.
post #34 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Most people rely on computers but still know nothing about them. It's still too common to here the harddrvie, CPU, motherboard, and RAM easily interchanged ...

Much like words in English that sound the same but mean completely different things.

Quote:
when something is actually talking about the harddrive, CPU, motherboard or RAM.

I personally get freaked out when inanimate objects start talking to me about technology.
post #35 of 55
where are all the people that said " ha ha ha 10% could never happen"?

Who's laughing now


told ya so told ya so
post #36 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQB View Post

Nothing would tarnish Apple's reputation faster than that.
Apple sells quality of experience, and the fact that OSX and Apple hardware are joined at the hip is what is responsible for that.

Exactly right. Meanwhile hardware junk AND OS junk in the other corner.

I suspect 12% is way too low of a prediction. I see friends and businesses everywhere switching. A business contact, who is about to switch on my advice, told me today that even his PC tech support guy admited he'd switched already!
From Apple ][ - to new Mac Pro I've used them all.
Long on AAPL so biased
Google Motto "You're not the customer. You're the product."
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From Apple ][ - to new Mac Pro I've used them all.
Long on AAPL so biased
Google Motto "You're not the customer. You're the product."
Reply
post #37 of 55
The last studies that I saw reported Apple's market share to be from 7.3 to 8%. But this article states it is 6.1%? Well one thing is for certain, it will eventually reach double digits.
Switching From Windows on Nov. 30th 2007
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MacBook Pro 13" 2011
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Switching From Windows on Nov. 30th 2007
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MacBook Pro 13" 2011
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post #38 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by cameronj View Post

The next logical step is to ask yourself which party is responsible for the PC's lacking ability to run Mac OS.

So are you saying its Apple's fault that they do not want OSX to run on the multitude of various set-ups of crapola PC machines? They do that purposefully, by not having an Open-Architecture like PCs, they avoid all the problems Windows machines have. I think that is a wise decision on Apple's part, and it makes the superior machines due to their ability to run both OSes. And its less about them wanting total control (like MS) and more about them delivering a better product for the consumer to enjoy.

Apple experimented once with Open-Architecture, we saw how that went. The PC world is Open-Architecture, and that platform is flooded with problems.

I knew someone was gonig to try to throw that one back at me. So, to answer your question, it is in fact the PC's inability, due to the load of crapola low-end Tim Allen configured crap boxes floating around, that OSX does not run on PCs. That reason is because a good majority of low-end Dells and eMachines could not handle OSX properly.
post #39 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by zanshin View Post

Many companies embrace Six Sigma and Kaizen principles and practices at all levels of business, and they no longer blindly accept that the corporate IT department is doing all it can to make personal computing and information management better.

Hasn't 6σ been discredited already? I thought the companies that abide by it lag the market.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lantzn View Post

I've been watching the Rapid Prototyping industry for years. I've been waiting for the day when we could have one in our homes! This is going to revolutionize the inventing process. The day is coming when the common man will be able to create a 3D prototype on his home computer, then turn around and actually create a single working model. How cool is that?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rapid_prototyping

$5000 to $1000 in 4 years
http://www.engadget.com/2007/05/08/d...5k-3d-printer/

That story was about 9 months ago and they still haven't shipped it as far as I can tell. The objects in their photo gallery aren't all that impressive in my opinion. The ZPrinter 450 is shipping as far as I can tell, but for $40,000. I think it's zcorp's product that is being used to make those custom WoW figures.
post #40 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdotdubz View Post

Apple experimented once with Open-Architecture, we saw how that went. The PC world is Open-Architecture, and that platform is flooded with problems.

While it did hurt Apple financially, I haven't heard of any problems with the third party MacOS systems.
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