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The Grammar Rant Thread! - Page 4

post #121 of 149
Try reading his post.

Wait, don't. Your head will probably explode.
"If I had played my career hitting singles like Pete (Rose), I'd wear a dress." - Mickey Mantle
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"If I had played my career hitting singles like Pete (Rose), I'd wear a dress." - Mickey Mantle
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post #122 of 149
Quick question...

Is it "in regard" or "in regards"?

i.e. This letter is "in regard(s)" to blah...blah...blah...
"If I had played my career hitting singles like Pete (Rose), I'd wear a dress." - Mickey Mantle
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"If I had played my career hitting singles like Pete (Rose), I'd wear a dress." - Mickey Mantle
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post #123 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guybrush Threepwood View Post

Quick question...

Is it "in regard" or "in regards"?

i.e. This letter is "in regard(s)" to blah...blah...blah...

If you're using OS X check it in the dictionary -- pretty handy for a stock app.

PHRASES
as regards concerning; with respect to : as regards content, the program will cover important current issues.
in this (or that) regard in connection with the point previously mentioned : there was little incentive for them to be active in this regard.
with (or in) regard to as concerns; with respect to : he made inquiries with regard to Beth.
ORIGIN Middle English : from Old French regarder to watch, from re- back (also expressing intensive force) + garder to guard.

In our desire to impose form on the world we have lost the capacity to see the form that is there;
and in that lies not liberation but alienation, the cutting off from things as they really are. --...

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In our desire to impose form on the world we have lost the capacity to see the form that is there;
and in that lies not liberation but alienation, the cutting off from things as they really are. --...

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post #124 of 149
Well I could have googled as well it but I knew you or midwinter would answer it within 15 minutes...
"If I had played my career hitting singles like Pete (Rose), I'd wear a dress." - Mickey Mantle
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"If I had played my career hitting singles like Pete (Rose), I'd wear a dress." - Mickey Mantle
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post #125 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guybrush Threepwood View Post

Well I could have googled as well it but I knew you or midwinter would answer it within 15 minutes...

Actually I had to look it up yesterday and found it by accident!

In our desire to impose form on the world we have lost the capacity to see the form that is there;
and in that lies not liberation but alienation, the cutting off from things as they really are. --...

Reply

In our desire to impose form on the world we have lost the capacity to see the form that is there;
and in that lies not liberation but alienation, the cutting off from things as they really are. --...

Reply
post #126 of 149
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guybrush Threepwood View Post

Quick question...

Is it "in regard" or "in regards"?

i.e. This letter is "in regard(s)" to blah...blah...blah...

"in regard to"
Gangs are not seen as legitimate, because they don't have control over public schools.
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Gangs are not seen as legitimate, because they don't have control over public schools.
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post #127 of 149
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guybrush Threepwood View Post

Well I could have googled as well it but I knew you or midwinter would answer it within 15 minutes...

If you could try to ask questions between 11-12 on MW or 10-12:30 on T/Th, that's when I have office hours.

Gangs are not seen as legitimate, because they don't have control over public schools.
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Gangs are not seen as legitimate, because they don't have control over public schools.
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post #128 of 149
Moot point, moot point, moot point, not mute point!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! AAAARRRRRRRRRRRRGGGGGGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
post #129 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

"Wives'" tale.

There's no such word as "wive". "Wives" is the plural, and the possessive form gets the apostrophe after the 's'.

Honors English, huh?

Actually, wive is a word. It means to take a wife. Otherwise, you are quite correct.

BTW, I started another post in this thread, and half way through it, it vanished. Is there a limbo where these posts go or did it just go pouf? I am nonplussed. When is someone 'plussed"?
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post #130 of 149
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tilt View Post

Moot point, moot point, moot point, not mute point!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! AAAARRRRRRRRRRRRGGGGGGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Joey: "It's a moo point. It's like a cow's opinion. It doesn't matter."
Gangs are not seen as legitimate, because they don't have control over public schools.
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Gangs are not seen as legitimate, because they don't have control over public schools.
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post #131 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by sequitur View Post

... I am nonplussed. When is someone 'plussed"?

Inebriated... when is someone "ebriated"?

Oh, and does the question mark go inside the quotes or outside?
post #132 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShawnJ View Post

English doesn't have a gender neutral pronoun for the third person singular besides the uber-pretentious "one."

Rant part: ENGLISH, YOU BASTARDIZED TONGUE!

Actually, in 1989, the American Language Association approved the use of the word "they" to refer to a singular pronoun in the third person.
post #133 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimDreamworx View Post

Inebriated... when is someone "ebriated"?

Oh, and does the question mark go inside the quotes or outside?

It goes inside if it's a quote, but I don't know if it's just a word in a sentence. It's not a quote; it's just emphasizing the word. Ask the grammar police.
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post #134 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by sequitur View Post

It goes inside if it's a quote, but I don't know if it's just a word in a sentence. It's not a quote; it's just emphasizing the word. Ask the grammar police.

It depends what you are asking. In this case it would go outside the quotation marks. You could put a question mark inside the quotes, but then you'd be asking when someone was "ebriated?", i.e. "ebriated with a (possibly ironic) rising intonation", and would need another question mark outside the quotes as well:

When is someone "ebriated?"?

Of course, that would be a stupid question, but at least it'd be punctuated properly.
it's = it is / it has, its = belonging to it.
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it's = it is / it has, its = belonging to it.
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post #135 of 149
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sequitur View Post

It goes inside if it's a quote, but I don't know if it's just a word in a sentence. It's not a quote; it's just emphasizing the word. Ask the grammar police.

If a question mark or exclamation point is contained within quotation marks, it is assumed that the punctuation is a part of the material being quoted. Otherwise, they should be placed outside the quotation marks.

Periods are different. They are always contained within the quotation marks. Unless you are English, and then all rules of grammar are thrown out the window and everything taught in America about punctuation is completely wrong. Including the names of some of the marks.
Gangs are not seen as legitimate, because they don't have control over public schools.
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Gangs are not seen as legitimate, because they don't have control over public schools.
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post #136 of 149
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post

It depends what you are asking. In this case it would go outside the quotation marks. You could put a question mark inside the quotes, but then you'd be asking when someone was "ebriated?", i.e. "ebriated with a (possibly ironic) rising intonation", and would need another question mark outside the quotes as well:

When is someone "ebriated?"?

Of course, that would be a stupid question, but at least it'd be punctuated properly.

Actually, there are examples like that. In the MLA citation method, this oddity happens:

So and so asked "blah blah blah?" (Smith 71).

Bizarre.
Gangs are not seen as legitimate, because they don't have control over public schools.
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Gangs are not seen as legitimate, because they don't have control over public schools.
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post #137 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwinter View Post

Periods are different. They are always contained within the quotation marks. Unless you are English, and then all rules of grammar are thrown out the window and everything taught in America about punctuation is completely wrong. Including the names of some of the marks.

Yeah, it's actually called a "full-stop", don't you know?

I'm not sure that there are that many differences between British and American punctuation. I'm pretty sure the full-stop should go inside the quotes even if you're British.

Having said that, it depends what you mean. I think if you are quoting a complete sentence, and the quote forms the end of your sentence, the full-stop goes inside the quotes (i.e., you don't have another full-stop outside the quotes). If you are not quoting a sentence and the quote comes at the end of your sentence, there's no full-stop inside the quotes, but there is one outside them.
it's = it is / it has, its = belonging to it.
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it's = it is / it has, its = belonging to it.
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post #138 of 149
Proofreading stuff:

"The products were extremely popular with men after their launch."

"Police subdue man with a machette."

"Police help dog bite victim."

There was also a answering machine manual: "after taking a message the machine will rewind and resent itself."




I'll have to remember some more...

In our desire to impose form on the world we have lost the capacity to see the form that is there;
and in that lies not liberation but alienation, the cutting off from things as they really are. --...

Reply

In our desire to impose form on the world we have lost the capacity to see the form that is there;
and in that lies not liberation but alienation, the cutting off from things as they really are. --...

Reply
post #139 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmz View Post

"Police help dog bite victim."

There was also a answering machine manual: "after taking a message the machine will rewind and resent itself."

These two are . I heartily recommend Anguished English for more of the same.
it's = it is / it has, its = belonging to it.
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it's = it is / it has, its = belonging to it.
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post #140 of 149
Here we go -- email database pays off! From a crime scene dynamics book -- how not to write your report:

When completely plastered, officers who volunteer will paint the locker room.

Miami police kill a man with a machete.

Three cars were reported stolen by the Los Angeles police yesterday.

Police begin campaign to run down jaywalkers.

Squad helps dog bite victim.

In our desire to impose form on the world we have lost the capacity to see the form that is there;
and in that lies not liberation but alienation, the cutting off from things as they really are. --...

Reply

In our desire to impose form on the world we have lost the capacity to see the form that is there;
and in that lies not liberation but alienation, the cutting off from things as they really are. --...

Reply
post #141 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwinter View Post

Actually, there are examples like that. In the MLA citation method, this oddity happens:

So and so asked "blah blah blah?" (Smith 71).

Bizarre.

Shouldn't there be a comma after asked. I was taught there was a comma after the speaker and punctuation to the left of the end quote.
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post #142 of 149
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sequitur View Post

Shouldn't there be a comma after asked. I was taught there was a comma after the speaker and punctuation to the left of the end quote.

When writing dialogue, yeah, that's the convention. But in non-dialogue situations, you could just write something like "Hamlet asks 'Whether tis nobler in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,' which is a really good question because I have heard arrows hurt."
Gangs are not seen as legitimate, because they don't have control over public schools.
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Gangs are not seen as legitimate, because they don't have control over public schools.
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post #143 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwinter View Post

"Hamlet asks 'Whether tis nobler in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,' which is a really good question because I have heard arrows hurt."

Only if you get hit by the end with the pointy thingy; otherwise, the other end with the feathers just tickles. BTW, I saw a commercial the other night that had a Border Collie named Molly. Have you seen it?
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post #144 of 149
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sequitur View Post

Only if you get hit by the end with the pointy thingy; otherwise, the other end with the feathers just tickles. BTW, I saw a commercial the other night that had a Border Collie named Molly. Have you seen it?

I have not! But I have an excuse. We got a Wii and have been doing lots of golfing.
Gangs are not seen as legitimate, because they don't have control over public schools.
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Gangs are not seen as legitimate, because they don't have control over public schools.
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post #145 of 149
Reading this whole thread was worth it just for rocket surgery. My own grammar is less than exceptional so I hate to throw stones, but I really can't stand the improper conjugation of verbs.
post #146 of 149
I flinch when someone on this forum uses subjects and verbs that don't agree. For example, "Apple make."
Apple is SINGULAR, people: "Apple makes." PLEASE. The world has 6 billion people, but the word world is SINGULAR.
Furthermore, the words everybody, everyone, everything, and neither are SINGULAR.
Some words are both singular and plural. For example, the word audience. "The audience is mesmerized." Singular. "The audience took their seats." Plural.

Whew, I'm glad to get that off my chest. I can go back to sleep, now.
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post #147 of 149
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sequitur View Post

I flinch when someone on this forum uses subjects and verbs that don't agree. For example, "Apple make."
Apple is SINGULAR, people: "Apple makes." PLEASE. The world has 6 billion people, but the word world is SINGULAR.
Furthermore, the words everybody, everyone, everything, and neither are SINGULAR.
Some words are both singular and plural. For example, the word audience. "The audience is mesmerized." Singular. "The audience took their seats." Plural.

Whew, I'm glad to get that off my chest. I can go back to sleep, now.

"Apple make" is a British thing. Has to do with differences in how Americans and Brits approach collective nouns, I believe.
Gangs are not seen as legitimate, because they don't have control over public schools.
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Gangs are not seen as legitimate, because they don't have control over public schools.
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post #148 of 149
Thanks for the info. I won't flinch any more. There are many lists of collective words pertaining to animals. My favorite is: http://www.hintsandthings.co.uk/kennel/collectives.htm
My favorite collective word is a 'murder' of ravens.

BTH, the commercial with the Collie Mollie is ADT Home Security System.
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post #149 of 149
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sequitur View Post

Thanks for the info. I won't flinch any more. There are many lists of collective words pertaining to animals. My favorite is: http://www.hintsandthings.co.uk/kennel/collectives.htm
My favorite collective word is a 'murder' of ravens.

BTH, the commercial with the Collie Mollie is ADT Home Security System.

Here's the best way to think about how weird this is:

"Apple [it] makes good stuff"

"Apple [they] make good stuff"

"The Counting Crows [they] are my favorite band"

"The Decemberists [they] are my favorite band"

"Vampire Weekend [they] is my favorite band"

Have fun.
Gangs are not seen as legitimate, because they don't have control over public schools.
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Gangs are not seen as legitimate, because they don't have control over public schools.
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