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MacBook Air HDD and SSD battery benchmarks - Page 2

post #41 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I'm just saying that it may be about as useful as zapping the PRAM, something that's almost useless and still, Apple offers that as a suggestion in case there are problems.

Yet Apple says it's important - and explains why.

If you follow Apple's recommendation and are not happy with the battery life, that's one thing. But if you fail to follow Apple's procedure for maximizing battery life, you have no grounds to complain.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #42 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Yet Apple says it's important - and explains why.

If you follow Apple's recommendation and are not happy with the battery life, that's one thing. But if you fail to follow Apple's procedure for maximizing battery life, you have no grounds to complain.

I think that's why they include that wording, to give a reason to blame the user even when the user might not be at fault at all. I think the procedures may be about as useful as a rain dance, the shaman might blame you for no rain because you didn't dance like he told you to.

It's possibly like the iPod reset procedure. You do NOT need to turn "hold" on and off as they say in the procedure to actually reset the iPod. But it's in the procedure anyway.
post #43 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I'm just saying that it may be about as useful as zapping the PRAM, something that's almost useless and still, Apple offers that as a suggestion in case there are problems.

Yes, but without any cited foundation to back it up, it just leads to many of the ignorant questions, suggestions or concerns as posted here.
post #44 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I think that's why they include that wording, to give a reason to blame the user even when the user might not be at fault at all. I think the procedures may be about as useful as a rain dance, the shaman might blame you for no rain because you didn't dance like he told you to.

It's possibly like the iPod reset procedure. You do NOT need to turn "hold" on and off as they say in the procedure to actually reset the iPod. But it's in the procedure anyway.

So you feel that we shouldn't bother to heed the advice recommended by developers.
I gather you have quite a following considering some of the ridiculous paths that people have taken operating and resolving respectively their hardware/software and any issues that have risen.

Want to help get costs down. Help reduce the need for customer support. I suggest following instructions right from the beginning would certainly be a beginning.
post #45 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by onceuponamac View Post

i went to an apple store and played with an Air - I think it represents some impressive engineering - but I don't think the device is compelling - from my standpoint it's not powerful enough - especially for the price point - For $1,200 - it might be interesting...

I completely agree. $1799 is too much. Like you said, 1.6 GHz @ 4200rpm is too slow. And shoot, only 80GB hard drive?? An iPod has twice that. Sure it has the portability/coolness factor but that surely isn't worth the extra dough. Considering the intro Macbook is essentially faster and starts at $1099, on speed alone the Air should be down around $900. To have a premium of $900 for the thinness factor is ridiculous. There must be something I'm missing here.
If they would drop the price to $1200-ish that would be much more reasonable; they would sell like hot cakes too. It's not like the Macbook and Macbook Pro are that much less portable, ya know? Here's three options that are arguably faster/better:

For $200 more you could get a Macbook Pro with:
2.2 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo
2GB memory
160GB hard drive @ 5400 rpm

For $1674 you could get a Macbook with:
2.2GHz Intel Core 2 Duo
2GB memory
250GB hard drive @ 5400 rpm

Or cheaper yet, for $1549 you could get a Macbook with:
2.0GHz Intel Core 2 Duo
2GB
250GBhard drive @ 5400 rpm

I would never buy a Macbook Air for the price they have them selling for now. The only thing it has going is the thinness, which is way over priced.
post #46 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

So you feel that we shouldn't bother to heed the advice recommended by developers.

It's not like that.

Quote:
I gather you have quite a following considering some of the ridiculous paths that people have taken operating and resolving respectively their hardware/software and any issues that have risen.

Want to help get costs down. Help reduce the need for customer support. I suggest following instructions right from the beginning would certainly be a beginning.

I think you've misread me. Maybe you're a developer and have had run-ins with a certain kind of person, but I'm not that kind of person.

Besides, as far as I can tell, the MacBook Air manual says nothing about "conditioning" the battery, and it doesn't say anything about a monthly discharge/recharge cycle. I suppose it's nice that Apple has a web page, but that information isn't in the manual itself. It's nice they offer an iCal reminder, but if they really believed in it, then why isn't it pre-loaded on the machine?
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