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Apple Time Capsule unboxing and preview - Page 2

post #41 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony1 View Post

Sorry, please pardon my brain-fart.

I sold my MBP a while back and have been depending on my towers lately, so I haven't been thinking straight I guess.

Also, many households have multiple computers. Whether they are notebooks or desktops they can all use the same networked drive for TM.
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post #42 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Now they do, but wasn't it just a few years ago when 1M hours was ONLY in Enterprise rated drives? I'm still trying to find something finite for its definition but there doesn't seem to be one. There seems to be a lot of common beliefs around the definition but no IEEE or other classification.


And they have an excellent marketing division. Fanboy or not, you can't deny the impressiveness of their marketing engine. Who knows, perhaps they purposely choose the DeskStar with 1M hours just to get free press that states that it's not labeled as Enterprise Grade but does have the requisite MTBF rating of such drives. I certainly don't put it past them.

But you yourself pretty much said that times change, in different words. So maybe it's "server grade" as of maybe 2004. That's hardly comforting.

I really can't believe that you're praising their weaseliness.
post #43 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

But you yourself pretty much said that times change, in different words. So maybe it's "server grade" as of maybe 2004. That's hardly comforting.

I really can't believe that you're praising their weaseliness.

I'm not praising it, I'm just saying it's not a big deal. Marketing always try to use buzz words that have no specific meaning. 1M hours is 114 years and the reviews of this drive are great.
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post #44 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I'm not praising it, I'm just saying it's not a big deal. Marketing always try to use buzz words that have no specific meaning.

I think this goes above and beyond that.

Quote:
1M hours is 114 years

The total life of one drive is not what is really being measured (or rather, estimated), it cannot simply be be restated like that.
post #45 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I think this goes above and beyond that.

I don't understand why you think they can't call it Server Grade. There is no definition that I know of and they use this exact drive in their servers. It's not like they found one backwoods shop in a 3rd-world country using it as a server to supplement their definition.
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post #46 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony1 View Post

What's the advantage of doing a TM backup to a TC opposed to a backup connected directly to your machine? Wouldn't a direct connection (via FW or internal) be faster anyway compared to wireless?

So you can backup multiple machines - why ask this question since you just answered it yourself in the next sentence?
Quote:
And why in the world would someone want to do multiple backups from multiple machines to a single drive (TC)? When that one drive craps out, all machines have lost there backup rather than just one. Enlighten me please.

So what if all machines lost their backup? Replace the drive and back them up again. Drive loss is always a risk whether it contains the backup of one or more machines. People who are serious about backups have multiple offsite backups anyway - this product is not meant to fit that bill.
Quote:
Just my opinion, not meaning to start any arguments. I'm sure someone can shoot it down, it's just that some people get caught up in so much hype about some products.

I don't think it's hype. I think people want a device that is always on, and can back up multiple machines, both desktop and portable. This fits the bid - it's like any other NAS system but it supports Time Machine and has a built-in router. Not only that, but consider that this feature will get people to back up. Whether you think it's the best solution or not, it's getting them to back up - something they weren't doing before.
post #47 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I don't understand why you think they can't call it Server Grade. There is no definition that I know of and they use this exact drive in their servers. It's not like they found one backwoods shop in a 3rd-world country using it as a server to supplement their definition.

Because they're trying to make the drive sound a lot better (more special) than it really is. It doesn't matter how many people do it, slapping in a desktop drive into a server doesn't make it a server rated drive.
post #48 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

Because they're trying to make the drive sound a lot better (more special) than it really is. It doesn't matter how many people do it, slapping in a desktop drive into a server doesn't make it a server rated drive.

There is no such definition as "server rated drive" so Apple can say what they want, but they do have validation since they have been using it in their own servers. No one is claiming that this rated as Enterprise grade.

On opposite ends of the spectrum we need to read between the lines of marketing and between the lines of technical specifications, which is just another way of marketing electronics. One technique uses unspecific terms and the other very specific terms, but neither one gives a full picture of a product.
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post #49 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

Because they're trying to make the drive sound a lot better (more special) than it really is. It doesn't matter how many people do it, slapping in a desktop drive into a server doesn't make it a server rated drive.

Nothing can make it officially "server-rated" because there IS no such official classification. However, using it in your own servers certainly would make it "server-rated" as far as you're concerned, and that's the only standard of truthfulness you can be held to. If you used that term for it in Time Capsule but wouldn't touch it with a ten-foot pole for your own servers, then somebody could take you to task.
post #50 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

There is no such definition as "server rated drive" so Apple can say what they want, but they do have validation since they have been using it in their own servers.

At least they're consistent, but it's still just a desktop drive. If the maker of said drives intended them to be used in servers, then the drive maker should be saying so in their literature.

The other part of the problem is that the terminology they use is intended to give the impression that it's an enterprise storage kind of drive, when it's anything but that. That's why I call it weasely. Even if all marketing departments do it to some extent, that doesn't make it right
post #51 of 80
Sorry for the noob questions, but do I need to have wireless internet to use time capsule as a back up drive? I know I have an Airport card in my Mac Pro, but no wireless router. Will I need to purchase one? If so, what kind is best for this?

Also, one more thing I'm confused about. I have four terabytes in my computer, can I buy four time capsules, and set one to back up each drive, or does time machine only work with one capsule? Thanks!
post #52 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

At least they're consistent, but it's still just a desktop drive. If the maker of said drives intended them to be used in servers, then the drive maker should be saying so in their literature.

If the only two grades for 3.5" HDDs are Desktop and Enterprise, and said drive is not advertised as such or fails to meet one or more requirement of the more stringent, Enterprise Grade classification, then said drive defaults Desktop Grade as there is no other classification available.

Additionally, if said drive is not uncommonly used in servers and there is no such classification as Server Grade, then an unofficial designation can veridically be placed upon said drive without cause for misrepresentation.

That is my lame attempt at lawyer speak.
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post #53 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by tim68 View Post

Sorry for the noob questions, but do I need to have wireless internet to use time capsule as a back up drive? I know I have an Airport card in my Mac Pro, but no wireless router. Will I need to purchase one? If so, what kind is best for this?

Also, one more thing I'm confused about. I have four terabytes in my computer, can I buy four time capsules, and set one to back up each drive, or does time machine only work with one capsule? Thanks!

"Good news, Everybody, Time Capsule is a wireless router"



You don't need wireless, and the Ethernet would be faster if you need to use it on a network. If you don't need the Airport Base Station router part of Time Capsule for your Mac Pro then you'd be better off just adding a HDD to your machine for the TimeMachine backups.Once you put a new drive in a prompt will appear asking you if you want to you use it for your backups.
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post #54 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by tim68 View Post

Sorry for the noob questions, but do I need to have wireless internet to use time capsule as a back up drive? I know I have an Airport card in my Mac Pro, but no wireless router. Will I need to purchase one?!

No, Time Capsule has a built-in wifi router.

EDIT: solipsism beat me to it.
post #55 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

At least they're consistent, but it's still just a desktop drive. If the maker of said drives intended them to be used in servers, then the drive maker should be saying so in their literature.

Doesn't matter much. The Google statistics show MTTF specs mean little and the Carnagie Mellon study of fiber channel and SCSI vs SATA drives didn't see much difference in quality.

You're seriously making a huge mountain out of drive manufacturer's mole hills. Desktop drives are effectively equivlaent to Enterprise drives in terms of reliability. Trusting any single drive backup method is better than nothing but sticking an "enterprise" grade drive in there simply fattens someone else's bottom line for little addtional value. The superior warranty isn't going to help you since you aren't a data center with hot swaps and RAID arrays.

http://www.usenix.org/event/fast07/t...tml/index.html

http://labs.google.com/papers/disk_failures.html

Server Grade, Desktop Grade, Enterprise Grade. BFD. One drive is one drive and all of these drives suffer from infant mortality far higher than their MTTF specs would have you believe.

This is why a lot of folks were hoping for ZFS as the Leopard file system.
post #56 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by vinea View Post

Doesn't matter much. The Google statistics show MTTF specs mean little and the Carnagie Mellon study of fiber channel and SCSI vs SATA drives didn't see much difference in quality.

You're seriously making a huge mountain out of drive manufacturer's mole hills. Desktop drives are effectively equivlaent to Enterprise drives in terms of reliability. Trusting any single drive backup method is better than nothing but sticking an "enterprise" grade drive in there simply fattens someone else's bottom line for little addtional value. The superior warranty isn't going to help you since you aren't a data center with hot swaps and RAID arrays.

http://www.usenix.org/event/fast07/t...tml/index.html

http://labs.google.com/papers/disk_failures.html

Server Grade, Desktop Grade, Enterprise Grade. BFD. One drive is one drive and all of these drives suffer from infant mortality far higher than their MTTF specs would have you believe.

This is why a lot of folks were hoping for ZFS as the Leopard file system.

Excellent post!
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post #57 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by vinea View Post

Doesn't matter much. The Google statistics show MTTF specs mean little and the Carnagie Mellon study of fiber channel and SCSI vs SATA drives didn't see much difference in quality.

You're seriously making a huge mountain out of drive manufacturer's mole hills. Desktop drives are effectively equivlaent to Enterprise drives in terms of reliability.

And Wd/IBM/Hitach Deathstar drives are to be voided at ANY cost. Enterprise my arse. I have a machine running 24/7 and i now swap them routinely after 1 year as they tend to corrupt after 1.5.

So - dunno but 114 years ain't 1.5 years and Goole prooved that as well.

The MTBF might be accurate if you keep your disk in a 100% dust free,13 degrees centigrades server room. But lets face it - whose house/appartment has THAT ? And I doubt that Extreme Makeover - House Edition will come to the rescue either. Bus driver - m-o-v-e t-h-a-t hard disk ? Hmmmm \
post #58 of 80
http://www.hitachigst.com/tech/techlib.nsf/techdocs/67A68C59B27368FC862572570080FC70/$file/Deskstar7K1000_010307_final.pdf

"Applications...
Networked storage servers"

Hence the term "server grade". So all blame goes to Hitachi and Apple is just an innocent victim of marketing.
post #59 of 80
This sounds obvious, but can anyone confirm that assuming I'm using the drive in time capsule to back up a computer wirelessly with TM, I can still use it for other normal storage purposes both from the same wirelessly connected mac and any other computers on the network?
Thanks
post #60 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by charliego7 View Post

This sounds obvious, but can anyone confirm that assuming I'm using the drive in time capsule to back up a computer wirelessly with TM, I can still use it for other normal storage purposes both from the same wirelessly connected mac and any other computers on the network?
Thanks

Sure can. It sticks a single Time Machine folder on the root of the HDD. In there are fodlers for each of your backed up Macs. Welcome to AI.
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post #61 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haggar View Post

http://www.hitachigst.com/tech/techlib.nsf/techdocs/67A68C59B27368FC862572570080FC70/$file/Deskstar7K1000_010307_final.pdf

"Applications...
Networked storage servers"

Hence the term "server grade". So all blame goes to Hitachi and Apple is just an innocent victim of marketing.

Great - its a DeathStar Disk. For back ups. On a disk running 24/7.

May I just ask one thing - why does anyone else here think that it is widely considered that those disks amrked the end of IBM disks if the disks were that good ?

Honestly ? Did samsung sells its HD division - no they made it - dixit Toshiba - dixit Seagate. Plese any informed user do a Google on Deaskstar Disks and their reliability.

And Apple is never an innocent victim - if you are one of the most profitable and sucessfull computer companies in the world (eat your hat M. Dell) you are never the victim but part of the process/problem.
post #62 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by freelander51 View Post

Great - its a DeathStar Disk. For back ups. On a disk running 24/7.

May I just ask one thing - why does anyone else here think that it is widely considered that those disks amrked the end of IBM disks if the disks were that good ?

Honestly ? Did samsung sells its HD division - no they made it - dixit Toshiba - dixit Seagate. Plese any informed user do a Google on Deaskstar Disks and their reliability.

And Apple is never an innocent victim - if you are one of the most profitable and sucessfull computer companies in the world (eat your hat M. Dell) you are never the victim but part of the process/problem.

1) Why do people still think that there are no programs for Macs when that hasn't been the case for many a year. Some people only seem to remember the bad stuff, which is why we will never have another cruise ship name Titanic, a shuttle named Challenger, or why I'll never name child my Dahmer-Osama Adolf-Manson Solipsism.

2) Reviews show that this drive functions remarkably well. The sensationalist "DeathStar" has stuck and no matter how the drive performs you're always going to associate the DeskStar brand with faulty drives. Japanese car companies had to create a new brands in the 1980s because no matter how luxurious the car was the brand was still associated with "cheap". So perhaps they'd do some good to rename them, but that name doesn't mean they are bad.
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post #63 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbird_1.0 View Post

No, Time Capsule has a built-in wifi router.

EDIT: solipsism beat me to it.

Thanks! Do you by any chance know if I can get four time capsules and have each one back up one of my four hard drives?
post #64 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by tim68 View Post

Thanks! Do you by any chance know if I can get four time capsules and have each one back up one of my four hard drives?

It can't, it's a consumer device. If you have 4 HDDs in your MacPro you don't need a Time Capsule. Just use do a RAID1+0 to two of your storage drives and use the 4th drive for a TIme Machine backup of your System drive.
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post #65 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Time Capsule, Apple's brand name for an Airport Extreme Base Station with an integrated hard drive and power adapter, is now shipping. Here's a look at what's in the box, and how the new Apple TV-sized wireless backup unit stacks up against the existing AirPort Extreme.

Inside the Box

While AirPort wireless devices have long been shipping in white boxes, Time Capsule ships in a black box with a purple galaxy graphic (below) reminiscent of Leopard's space themed desktop background. The association is a clear nod toward the new wireless base station's support for Leopard's Time Machine feature.



The packaging borrows from the iPod's, with a paper cover that slides off to reveal a plain black box (below) with the words "Designed by Apple in California."



The paper and styrofoam box opens like a book to reveal the shrink wrapped base station unit (below).



Underneath the device is a white envelope with regulatory information, a setup guide booklet, install software, and an AC power cable (below).



The Bigger Box (As Seen On Apple TV)

There's no power brick because Time Capsule includes the AC transformer in the unit itself, just like the Apple TV. The existing AirPort Extreme uses an external power adapter (below), which helps makes it slightly smaller at the expense of having a longer tail and another box to hide. Time Capsule also manages to find room inside itself for a full sized 3.5" hard disk drive with either a full or half terabyte capacity.



Time Capsule has the same 7.7" square outline as Apple TV, making it noticeably larger than the existing 6.5" AirPort Extreme when stacked (below), as well as being a bit heavier.



It has all the same ports as the existing Extreme, although Time Capsule has a regular AC power plug instead of a round DC adapter for the AirPort Extreme's power brick. USB is used for connecting additional hard drives or shared printers; there are three Gigabit Ethernet LAN network jacks (just like the second revision of the Extreme; the original unit only supplied 10/100 Fast Ethernet ports) a WAN network jack, a reset button, and a security hole for a locking cable.



All three units share the same rubberized bottom, which is glued to the base in a way that makes opening up the unit awkward but not entirely difficult. There aren't any intended user serviceable parts inside. Users who outgrow the supplied 500GB or 1TB drive are expected to add an external disk via USB rather than peeling the drive open to swap in a larger model.

The only other cosmetic difference is that Time Capsule has a shiny, mirror finished Apple logo on top rather than the Extreme's plain embossed logo outline or Apple TV's printed logo on a glossy inlaid plastic panel (below).



Time Capsule is just slightly taller than the Extreme and shares the same slotted top design (below top), while it's a full lip taller than Apple TV (below bottom).





Time Capsule Software

The installer CD includes a PDF version of the printed user guide, a brief read me, a "need to know" PDF guide about backups (also included in print as a short leaflet), and an HTML page linking to various resources on finding more information, including the extended references such as Designing AirPort Networks, at Apple - Support - Manuals.

The read me document lists system requirements:

Time Machine backup requires Mac OS X Leopard v10.5.2 or later
AirPort Utility requires Mac OS X v10.4.x or later for configuration of Time Capsule
Wireless network access requires a Macintosh computer with AirPort or AirPort Extreme card
WPA2 support requires a Macintosh computer with an AirPort Extreme card

The short Need to Know PDF points out some basic tips:

The first backup will take a long time, perhaps even lasting overnight
You can set Time Machine to exclude items in Options to save space on the Time Capsule drive
Users should set up the device as the primary base station because its 802.11N is faster than than the Express or earlier AirPort units
Portables being backed up will complete fastest if they have a good signal in the same room as the Time Capsule and are plugged into power
If a Mac is shut down or interrupted during Time Machine backup, it will just start up from where it left off next time



Like the earlier AirPort Extreme, the Time Capsule software includes "AirPort Extreme" 802.11N enabler software for any Macs that shipped with 802.11N hardware but did not include software drivers for it, as well as the AirPort Utility software.

Setting up the unit is as easy as plugging it in, starting AirPort Utility, selecting the unit, and running through the setup assistant (below).





If you select the option to replace an existing base station (below top), the next option presented is to pick from one of the existing configuration settings saved by AirPort Utility, making for a painless upgrade (below bottom). Also available in the base station upgrade candidate list are third party devices saved by the local AirPort client software as previously used WiFi networks.





Another option is to join and extend the range of an existing wireless network. Pick a wireless network, and the software supplies your login if it has previously been joined and the password saved to the Keychain (below).





These slickly automated upgrade and expand options highlight the advantages of using standalone client software to configure the AirPort units rather than a simple embedded web page as most wireless base stations do. Alternatively, none of the AirPort base stations, including Time Capsule, can be set up from a basic web browser; they require installing the AirPort Utility software, which works on both the Mac and Windows PCs.

The Time Capsule Disk

The included drive is formatted and ready for use. The volume name can be changed from the Disks section by selecting the Time Capsule volume (below top). To erase and reformat the drive, select the Time Capsule Disk and click Erase... (below bottom). Either page can be used to boot off all connected users.





The file sharing tab (below) allows you to limit guess access to read only or block guests entirely; setting a Workgroup name is used to serve the drive to Windows clients; and "secure shared disks" offers three options for shared disk security:

with a Time Capsule password uses the same password to access the shared disk as to join the wireless network
with a disk password uses a separate password for the network and disk access
with user accounts sets up the ability to add multiple users on a third tab, each with their own password and an option to limit them to read only access or to block their access without affecting the other users.



No Love for Extreme Users?

Other options for sharing USB printers, logging, SNMP, IPv6, and Bonjour services are identical to the existing AirPort Extreme. Apple continues to sell the Extreme alongside the new Time Capsule models, but hasn't yet issued an update allowing Time Machine to backup to USB disks attached to the Extreme. This is disappointing because a lot of users expect Time Machine backups to work with their existing Extreme shared disks, and Apple hasn't released any clear indication on whether this will be released or not.

It would really seem petty if Apple expected its Extreme customers to all upgrade to Time Capsule, particularly since the company prominently advertised Time Machine as a feature that was planned to work with shared disks on the Extreme in pre-release Leopard information. While those features were listed as "subject to change," there appears to be no technical reason for not supporting the Extreme with Time Machine. Time Capsule also supports externally connected USB disks for use with Time Machine.

We will be testing the drive included with Time Capsule against USB drives attached to an AirPort Extreme in a more in depth look at Time Capsule, but the limitations of wireless networking will likely show no difference in performance throughput between the two. Readers who would like to make special request of the reviewer ahead of the formal review can email Prince with those requests.

Time Capsule is offered in two versions alongside the existing AirPort Express and Extreme:

AirPort Express $99 802.11b/g No disk sharing; USB printer and AirTunes audio sharing only. AirPort Extreme $179 802.11a/b/g/n USB disk and printer sharing; disk for network storage only. Time Capsule $299 802.11a/b/g/n 500 GB disk, USB disk, and printer sharing; Time Machine backups. Time Capsule $499 802.11a/b/g/n 1TB (1024 GB) disk, USB disk, and printer sharing; Time Machine backups.

I installed Airport Utility from CD that came with Time Capsule. Network setup was easy to perform using the setup assistant - I was well pleased with that. My configuration included several external HD's connected to Time capsule via a USB hub. I was able to access them without any problem. But I was unable to access the Time Capsule internal HD. I got the following error:
"The operation cannot be completed because the original item for MYNAME's Time Capsule" cannot be found". It was pointed out to me by my son that the apostrophe in the name may be causing a problem. The HD was named automatically during the setup process! I changed the HD name to remove the apostrophe. Once I did this I was able to access the drive. It seems that the setup assistant has a flaw in how it names the internal HD!

I don't know if others have experienced the same problem.

TTFN Peter
post #66 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony1 View Post

What's the advantage of doing a TM backup to a TC opposed to a backup connected directly to your machine? Wouldn't a direct connection (via FW or internal) be faster anyway compared to wireless? And why in the world would someone want to do multiple backups from multiple machines to a single drive (TC)? When that one drive craps out, all machines have lost there backup rather than just one. Enlighten me please.

Personally, I'm not sold on this product. As for backups, as cheap as HDD's are today there's no reason why anyone couldn't afford a dependable drive and enclosure for each machine they own. As far as wirelessly sharing an iTunes library, hell I've been doing that since my old APE (flying saucer style) was released (along with a $75 G4 tower) and even those files are backed up elsewhere. I also have the ability of quickly throwing my iTunes drive into a machine if I choose. I feel that depending too much on a single device, in this case, is not a good idea.

If this device can allow a backup of itself then it may be a plausible if someone's using it for TM.

Just my opinion, not meaning to start any arguments. I'm sure someone can shoot it down, it's just that some people get caught up in so much hype about some products.

Tony

Space! I would love to have my back up HDD down stairs in the basement as opposed to on my desk with a USB cable and power cable. Cleaner look is the draw for me. I don't have a Time Capsule unit yet but I imagine I will soon.

Also, I can backup multiple machines to one central location without the hardware being on their desk to get knocked off (work). Space is again key with fewer cables.
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post #67 of 80
Ok, why all of a sudden Apple is going nuts with all this back-up hardware and software? It seems to me computers have been around for an awfully long time and no one's died, no countries have collapsed, no villages burned down and no massive financial ruin befall anyone due to a lack of back-up hardware and software. So why now all of a sudden is there this hysteria to back everything the F up? I would rather have Apple focus it's development on more ground breaking products like the macbook air or software. Just my opinion. Seems like a lot of future e-waste.
post #68 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsweimer View Post

Ok, why all of a sudden Apple is going nuts with all this back-up hardware and software? It seems to me computers have been around for an awfully long time and no one's died, no countries have collapsed, no villages burned down and no massive financial ruin befall anyone due to a lack of back-up hardware and software. So why now all of a sudden is there this hysteria to back everything the F up? I would rather have Apple focus it's development on more ground breaking products like the macbook air or software. Just my opinion. Seems like a lot of future e-waist.

Untapped market for big potential.

The need is there. Have you used a one touch backup HDD? Not very good when compared to SuperDuper! or TIme Machine.

Did I mention an untapped market for Apple to exploit billions of dollars from AI members alone.
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post #69 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsweimer View Post

Ok, why all of a sudden Apple is going nuts with all this back-up hardware and software? It seems to me computers have been around for an awfully long time and no one's died, no countries have collapsed, no villages burned down and no massive financial ruin befall anyone due to a lack of back-up hardware and software. So why now all of a sudden is there this hysteria to back everything the F up? I would rather have Apple focus it's development on more ground breaking products like the macbook air or software. Just my opinion. Seems like a lot of future e-waste.

Wow! SImply, wow!
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #70 of 80
yeah I get the dollar aspect and all that. $$$ more more more. It's just a little bonkers how a company can drive the public into thinking they need this stuff. It's like some Photographers I know who back up to a portable HD and ship it to another state for safe keeping. Well, if the state you're living in goes down I don't think you need to worry about your pictures that you sent out of state, you'll be dead. Why not send it to the moon. My point is why not as a company direct your attention to something worth while, something truly untapped.
post #71 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsweimer View Post

Ok, why all of a sudden Apple is going nuts with all this back-up hardware and software? It seems to me computers have been around for an awfully long time and no one's died, no countries have collapsed, no villages burned down and no massive financial ruin befall anyone due to a lack of back-up hardware and software. So why now all of a sudden is there this hysteria to back everything the F up? I would rather have Apple focus it's development on more ground breaking products like the macbook air or software. Just my opinion. Seems like a lot of future e-waste.

Purchased media and user created media.
Apple is selling a lot of people a lot of data files. Plus many more data files are being generated by us users through iPhoto, iMovie and Garageband. How many of those files have been lost due to hardware failures? How many were backed up? How much hand holding has Apple done while consoling people for their lost masterpieces? I bet a lot. This is Apples solution.
What goes online stays online. What is online will become public.
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What goes online stays online. What is online will become public.
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post #72 of 80
"Wow! SImply, wow!"


Speak of the devil.
post #73 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsweimer View Post

yeah I get the dollar aspect and all that. $$$ more more more. It's just a little bonkers how a company can drive the public into thinking they need this stuff. It's like some Photographers I know who back up to a portable HD and ship it to another state for safe keeping. Well, if the state you're living in goes down I don't think you need to worry about your pictures that you sent out of state, you'll be dead. Why not send it to the moon. My point is why not as a company direct your attention to something worth while, something truly untapped.

Think Katerina.
How many photographers lost their primary files and local backup files? I don't know, but I bet the most relieved were those who had out of state backup. A lot was lost there as many were forced to leave with just the clothes on their back.
What goes online stays online. What is online will become public.
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What goes online stays online. What is online will become public.
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post #74 of 80
Point well made.
post #75 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsweimer View Post

yeah I get the dollar aspect and all that. $$$ more more more. It's just a little bonkers how a company can drive the public into thinking they need this stuff. It's like some Photographers I know who back up to a portable HD and ship it to another state for safe keeping. Well, if the state you're living in goes down I don't think you need to worry about your pictures that you sent out of state, you'll be dead. Why not send it to the moon. My point is why not as a company direct your attention to something worth while, something truly untapped.

First of all, backing up one's data has always been important, and many companies have tried to address the problem but it's often been tedious, difficult, and/or expensive to do. We are also getting more and more digital each year. My parents don't even own a film camera anymore.

We are now at a point where home networks and capabilities are fast and large enough to be had at very reasonable prices. I know I have been backing up for many years. i used to put all personal info in a text file that was saved as a draft email on Hotmail.com. Oh, the memories.

Now I can backup large video files I'm almost certain I'll never watch again to music and keychain passwords, bookmarks, and contacts. .Mac and migration assistance takes care of most of that for me. And with the iPhone, the result is that I never have to add all my contacts manually to a new cellphone and edited contacts can be down more comfortably with Address Book on a Mac.

Now that I think of it, I have my most important data saved in no less than 5 places at once. This is a common thing with progression. We depend on computers more and more each day and so much of us (in some regard) is stored in them that it's only natural that we'd want to preserve if possible.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #76 of 80
And what if we ran out or severely crippled our power resources? What if all of a sudden only life sustaining energy could be used. Heat, water, Hospitals, the like. I'm not being a...what do they call it? A doomsday freak for lack of a better term. Just suppose we put all this energy, time, money and effort into backing up all these trivial things created by our computers into making a real difference with the direction we are headed in life. As for myself I can remember the days when I could recite 12-20 telephone numbers. Shit now I can hardly remember my own. Thankfully it's backed up somewhere. I realize having all these new shinny things makes us feel better, more secure, safe. But what if, what if we all of a sudden we had to actually write shit down to back it up.
post #77 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsweimer View Post

And what if we ran out or severely crippled our power resources? What if all of a sudden only life sustaining energy could be used. Heat, water, Hospitals, the like. I'm not being a...what do they call it? A doomsday freak for lack of a better term. Just suppose we put all this energy, time, money and effort into backing up all these trivial things created by our computers into making a real difference with the direction we are headed in life. As for myself I can remember the days when I could recite 12-20 telephone numbers. Shit now I can hardly remember my own. Thankfully it's backed up somewhere. I realize having all these new shinny things makes us feel better, more secure, safe. But what if, what if we all of a sudden we had to actually write shit down to back it up.

That is why one of my backup methods is to etch things onto large stone slabs. Though I could always etch it onto aluminium Macs.

Seriously though, if that were to happen then all that data would be worthless to be anyway. I'd be more interested to getting on Mel Gibson's good side.

I mean it this time: Seriously, the chances of that happening is not something I consider. but if it does I hope I can get my own Interceptor.



PS: The movie Doomsday looks interesting.
PPS: Oddly, I can seemingly remember every phone number until the time I started storing them in cell phones. Now, like you say, I sometimes forget my own cell number.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #78 of 80
Cheers, I'll take the BMW K1200R myself.
Thanks for the discussion.
post #79 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

1) Why do people still think that there are no programs for Macs when that hasn't been the case for many a year. Some people only seem to remember the bad stuff, which is why we will never have another cruise ship name Titanic, a shuttle named Challenger, or why I'll never name child my Dahmer-Osama Adolf-Manson Solipsism.

2) Reviews show that this drive functions remarkably well. The sensationalist "DeathStar" has stuck and no matter how the drive performs you're always going to associate the DeskStar brand with faulty drives. Japanese car companies had to create a new brands in the 1980s because no matter how luxurious the car was the brand was still associated with "cheap". So perhaps they'd do some good to rename them, but that name doesn't mean they are bad.

I happen to have quite a stock of dead deskstar disks behind me. Ranging from the year 200 to the year 2007. It might just have been coincidence granted. But on a more general statement : consumer HDs should never ever run 24/7 for more then a year in a consumer environement.

The MTBFs as per the manufacturers are under OPTIMAL conditions. Dust free, low temp. Great - but whose's household really does offer this ? Really ! Or isn't the 'common' SOHO a warm(ish) room usually full of clutter and other stuff. Who has a SOHO that is similar to a Data Center.

Should the drive power down though => then the following is me and what i get for my nagging
post #80 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I mean it this time: Seriously, the chances of that happening is not something I consider. but if it does I hope I can get my own Interceptor.



PS: The movie Doomsday looks interesting.
PPS: Oddly, I can seemingly remember every phone number until the time I started storing them in cell phones. Now, like you say, I sometimes forget my own cell number.

Woot! Fellow Mad Max fan?
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