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Reseller's website offline following pledge of $400 Mac clone

post #1 of 236
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The website of a Miami-based networking and security solutions reseller became inaccessible Monday, shortly after the company began advertising an unauthorized Mac clone for a fraction of the cost of Apple's cheapest system.

Dubbed OpenMac, the $400 offering from Psystar Corporation is described as "a low-cost high-performance computing platform" based on the ongoing OSX86Project -- a hacker-based initiative aimed at maintaining a version of the Mac OS X operating system for everyday PCs.

The 'basic' OpenMac is capable of running Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard, Psystar says, and includes a 2.2GHz Intel Core 2 Duo microprocessor, 2GB of DDR2 667 RAM, an integrated Intel GMA 950 Graphics card, 20x DVD+/-R drive, 4 USB ports, and a 250GB 7200RPM drive. However, the Psystar online store also lists several upgrade options, including FireWire ports, a 2.66GHz processor, and a nVidia GeForce 8600GT 512MB graphics card.

"When comparing base configurations, [Apple's] Mac Mini costs 150% of the price of the OpenMac while offering poorer performance, smaller storage space, and RAM," the company wrote. "Not only that but the Mac Mini doesn't have the option for an nVidia GeForce 8600 video card like the OpenMac does so playing games on it is a lost cause."

Unfortunately for Psystar, its offering is only likely to test the response time of Apple's legal department. The reseller told MacLife that while it has yet to receive a correspondence from the Cupertino-based Mac maker, it would be "ready" to respond.

At issue is Section 2A of the Mac OS X End User License Agreement (EULA), which stipulates that users are allowed "to install, use and run one (1) copy of the Apple Software on a single Apple-labeled computer at a time." As such, the OpenMac (and any other Mac system based on non-Apple hardware) would appear to stand in direct violation of Apple's terms.

Although Apple ran an authorized Mac clone program for a stint of about two years in the mid-to-late 90's, its stance has remained that of disapproval ever since chief executive Steve Jobs put an end to Mac OS X licensing with the release of Mac OS 8.0.

Still, curiosity over Psystar's offering was enough to knock the reseller's website offline for most of the day. The company said its web traffic peaked at over 30,000 hits per second on Monday, causing an outage and prompting it to begin handling customer orders for the OpenMac via email.
post #2 of 236
Well, I know lots of folks here are going to say that Apple can't afford to offer OSX customer service to computers they don't build, or something like that, and that might be true - if they did, they might end up with similar, or worse, customer service and quality issues than Microsoft has.

That said, it would be great if it was possible to have an OSX desktop that sacrificed the pretty plastic form-factor of the existing Apple-built options for a super-cheap mid-tower option as this company was trying to do.


This model was basically the same specs as an iMac and much, much cheaper than even an old macmini. I wonder what it would cost them to build something closer to a Mac Pro?
post #3 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by Superbass View Post

Well, I know lots of folks here are going to say that Apple can't afford to offer OSX customer service to computers they don't build, or something like that, and that might be true - if they did, they might end up with similar, or worse, customer service and quality issues than Microsoft has.

That said, it would be great if it was possible to have an OSX desktop that sacrificed the pretty plastic form-factor of the existing Apple-built options for a super-cheap mid-tower option as this company was trying to do.


This model was basically the same specs as an iMac and much, much cheaper than even an old macmini. I wonder what it would cost them to build something closer to a Mac Pro?

I don't think the $400 included OS X or iLIfe, which are included in the price of a mini.
Their price comparison was a little deceptive in my opinion.
post #4 of 236
You don't need Psystar to build you a Hackintosh. There is an entire community out there with rated HW and associated KEXTs so you know what you should buy before you buy it. And you can do it cheaper than Psystar. Of course, you can't run the store bought copy of OS X that they were offering. I'm not sure how they accomplished that.
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post #5 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by quinney View Post

I don't think the $400 included OS X or iLIfe, which are included in the price of a mini.
Their price comparison was a little deceptive in my opinion.

Well, the article says it would be running OSX, but even if it doesn't come with it, adding both Leopard and iLife would bring the total to $630. The clone has the following specs : 2.2GHz Intel Core 2 Duo, 2GB of DDR2 memory, Integrated Intel GMA 950 Graphics, 20x DVD+/-R Drive, four USB ports and a 250GB 7200RPM drive, which is double the hard drive size, doube the memory, and a faster processor than the $800 Mini.

Still, a savings of at least $170 for double the memory and storage plus a faster processor, and maybe most importantly, the ability to upgrade, and all at the sacrifice of form factor means a pretty damn good deal, in my opinion for somebody looking at a budget-type computer that at some point might want to upgrade to something with a bit more juice.

Another cool thing about this system that hasn't been mentioned, is that in 3 years from now when Apple is only offering the latest 2011 Intel processor, it'll be possible to upgrade to a 2010 processor and increase power for what should be pretty low prices.
post #6 of 236
Apple, please make us a QUIET Mac miniTOWER with FireWire 800 and 7200 rpm disks inside.
post #7 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

You don't need Psystar to build you a Hackintosh. There is an entire community out there with rated HW and associated KEXTs so you know what you should buy before you buy it. And you can do it cheaper than Psystar. Of course, you can't run the store bought copy of OS X that they were offering. I'm not sure how they accomplished that.

I guess they are banking on people not wanting to muck with the hacks themselves and being willing to pay someone else to do it for them..and still be cheaper than a direct from Apple option.

I really wonder how they think Apple would let them get away with offering OSX pre-installed on these machines. That is a blatant violation of the EULA. Now, if they were to offer the box and detailed instructions on how to get OSX on there, maybe that would take the legal onus off of them and put it onto the consumer, whom Apple is unlikely to sue. On the other hand, I could imagine someone wanting to push this with Apple to force an anti-trust action. Apple is a monopoly player, within their market, on both hardware and OS, and is using this monopoly to limit customer choices within this market. I doubt an anti-trust suit would be successful and certain it would be beyond the financial abilities of a small company to follow through on, but it would be interesting.

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post #8 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by Superbass View Post

Well, the article says it would be running OSX,

arstechnica article says they offered OSX preloaded.

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post #9 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by quinney View Post

I don't think the $400 included OS X or iLIfe, which are included in the price of a mini.
Their price comparison was a little deceptive in my opinion.

It seems like it would almost have to come with OS X if they were expecting to sell them. Of course, maybe they were offering just the hardware with whatever software the OSX86 Project required to run OS 10.5. That would be one way for the company to avoid violating the EULA. Then it would up to the purchaser to supply the copy of the Mac OS (and in the process violate the EULA).

To try to reach the base model of the clone brings the Apple price to $949 ($100 for an extra GB of RAM and $50 to get to 160GB HD which is still 90GB short of the clone's HD size)...compare that to their $400 + $129 for the OS = $529...heck throw in iLife for another $79 still only brings you to $608...which still makes the Mac Mini cost over 50% more than the clone.

Which would I rather buy, the clone or the Mini? (If you guessed the Mini, try again)
post #10 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulkas View Post

I really wonder how they think Apple would let them get away with offering OSX pre-installed on these machines. That is a blatant violation of the EULA. Now, if they were to offer the box and detailed instructions on how to get OSX on there, maybe that would take the legal onus off of them and put it onto the consumer, whom Apple is unlikely to sue. On the other hand, I could imagine someone wanting to push this with Apple to force an anti-trust action. Apple is a monopoly player, within their market, on both hardware and OS, and is using this monopoly to limit customer choices within this market. I doubt an anti-trust suit would be successful and certain it would be beyond the financial abilities of a small company to follow through on, but it would be interesting.

The End-User license agreement is just that - an agreement with the "End User", not the manufacturer or necessarily the installer. The only person who can violate is whoever buys it. Apple would have to take the company to court to get lists of purchasers, and then sue the individual users, which would be difficult and time consuming.

Does anyone know of any instances of a company actually suing for breach of EULA? I know that all of the recent piracy lawsuits have involved copyright law exclusively and not breach of EULA...
post #11 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by zunx View Post

Apple, please make us a QUIET Mac miniTOWER with FireWire 800 and 7200 rpm disks inside.

I think that you should add to the list that it should NOT use laptop parts (CPU, RAM, HD, etc. should be desktop components).
post #12 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by caliminius View Post

... brings you to $608...which still makes the Mac Mini cost over 50% more than the clone.

Yes, but with the mini you are not just paying for a low end machine, you're paying for the form factor. How much would a PC with the same form factor and specs as a $599 Mac mini cost?
post #13 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by Superbass View Post

The End-User license agreement is just that - an agreement with the "End User", not the manufacturer or necessarily the installer. The only person who can violate is whoever buys it. Apple would have to take the company to court to get lists of purchasers, and then sue the individual users, which would be difficult and time consuming.

Does anyone know of any instances of a company actually suing for breach of EULA? I know that all of the recent piracy lawsuits have involved copyright law exclusively and not breach of EULA...

Unless they have a license as a reseller from Apple, I would think that they would be considered the end user at the time they install OS X.

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post #14 of 236
Their site is still up.



I love how they say they can get you a Mac Pro at Mini prices...


Have these idiots priced the Quad Core Penryns?
post #15 of 236
Man, I was wondering how long it would take AI to post this article... We've been talking about it all day on MacRumors.

Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

You don't need Psystar to build you a Hackintosh. There is an entire community out there with rated HW and associated KEXTs so you know what you should buy before you buy it. And you can do it cheaper than Psystar. Of course, you can't run the store bought copy of OS X that they were offering. I'm not sure how they accomplished that.

Actually now you can use your store-bought copy of Leopard. You build the PC, patch your store-bought leopard, utilize some EFI-emulation, and viola.

If you looked at the OSx86 project long ago and decided it wasn't worth it, you should give it another look. There've been a lot of advancements in the last few months.

-Clive
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post #16 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clive At Five View Post

Man, I was wondering how long it would take AI to post this article... We've been talking about it all day on MacRumors.



Actually now you can use your store-bought copy of Leopard. You build the PC, patch your store-bought leopard, utilize some EFI-emulation, and viola.

If you looked at the OSx86 project long ago and decided it wasn't worth it, you should give it another look. There've been a lot of advancements in the last few months.

-Clive

SWIM has been using Hackintosh for quite awhile, though (s)he never updated to Leopard because things were working so well with 10.4.10. Though (s)he hasn't looked at the sites for about 4 months now. I'll let (s)he know, thanks.
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post #17 of 236
Despite appearances, Apple is a hardware company. The purpose of the software is to add value to the hardware. Sure, they sell some software like Aperture, Final Cut, etc. But OSX and iLife are all about selling you the hardware. That's the reason they can sell you Leopard for $129 vs MS selling Vista for hundreds more. Apple makes their money on the hardware (that goes for computers, iPods, iPhones, etc).

If they let other companies sell the hardware, we'd start seeing OS upgrades costing more and there would start to be draconian activitation processes like Windows has to prevent piracy. As it is, Apple is pretty liberal with their OS. You never have to enter an license codes or anything to install (unlike their professional apps).
post #18 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by Superbass View Post

Well, the article says it would be running OSX, but even if it doesn't come with it, adding both Leopard and iLife would bring the total to $630. The clone has the following specs : 2.2GHz Intel Core 2 Duo, 2GB of DDR2 memory, Integrated Intel GMA 950 Graphics, 20x DVD+/-R Drive, four USB ports and a 250GB 7200RPM drive, which is double the hard drive size, doube the memory, and a faster processor than the $800 Mini.

Still, a savings of at least $170 for double the memory and storage plus a faster processor, and maybe most importantly, the ability to upgrade, and all at the sacrifice of form factor means a pretty damn good deal, in my opinion for somebody looking at a budget-type computer that at some point might want to upgrade to something with a bit more juice.

Another cool thing about this system that hasn't been mentioned, is that in 3 years from now when Apple is only offering the latest 2011 Intel processor, it'll be possible to upgrade to a 2010 processor and increase power for what should be pretty low prices.

yeah but with memory prices how they are right now that's a non-issue, the processor speed is a non-issue since they are both core 2 duos, and the $170 price difference doesn't take into account the lack of support from apple, lack of a 1 year warranty from apple, and likelihood of the whole system being broken by a single update.

it doesn't really beat the mac mini. but really a lot of apple fans want a midrange desktop tower.

i won't even say say apple needs to make one, though. desktops are dead to the consumer, and that's unfortunate because they are still the best choice for enthusiasts. so apple is perfectly happy selling gazillions of macbooks.
post #19 of 236
LOL, they charge you an OSX install fee.


For the entry level model, it's $604.99

Base $399.99
Firewire + $50.00
OSX Installed +$155.00

Total $604.99



post #20 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

SWIM has been using Hackintosh for quite awhile, though SWIM never updated to Leopard because things were working so well with 10.4.10. Though SWIM hasn't looked at the sites for about 4 months now. I'll let SWIM know, thanks.

So can you ask SWIY how GarageBand and pro-app performance is on his/her hackintosh? I haven't - I mean, SWIM hasn't had an opportunity to get his/her PC prepped for his/her hackintosh implementation yet. (S)he'd really like to know.

-Clive
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post #21 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by akhomerun View Post

yeah but with memory prices how they are right now that's a non-issue, the processor speed is a non-issue since they are both core 2 duos

It'll still cost $100 bucks to upgrade the memory on a mini, and processor speed would be an issue to a lot of users.

Quote:
Originally Posted by akhomerun View Post

it doesn't really beat the mac mini.

Maybe be not in terms of size, but in prices, individual components and upgrade ability it does

Quote:
Originally Posted by akhomerun View Post

desktops are dead to the consumer

You're funny!
post #22 of 236
I think this outfit may be on the wrong side of the law on several counts. First, by calling their product "OpenMac" they are likely already infringing on Apple's trademarks. Additionally, as previously mentioned, they likely need a reseller agreement of some type to avoid being considered the end-user. At any rate, Apple does have some say how there IP can be used.

The monopoly argument is really kind of a stretch. Sure, Apple has a monopoly within Macintosh systems just as Chevy has a monopoly on Corvettes, but does it make sense to define the market so narrowly? Put in the proper market context (PCs and cars), neither holds a monopoly. A more likely argument is that Apple has a monopoly in portable media players.

I really wonder what makes people feel that a company should be compelled to release their IP to its competitors. When Lexicon developed Logic 7 audio processing, it was offered exclusively in Lexicon products so Lexicon had a 100 percent monopoly on Logic 7 audio processing. When Harman International acquired Lexicon they offered Logic variants in products from some other Harman brands. As the owner of the technology, that is their right and they are free to do what they wish with the technology as long as they do not: a) have a monopoly in their market, and b) use that monopoly in an unfair anti-competitive manner.
post #23 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by skottichan View Post

LOL, they charge you an OSX install fee.


For the entry level model, it's $604.99

Base $399.99
Firewire + $50.00
OSX Installed +$155.00

Total $604.99




Well, it's still a lot cheaper than a comparably set up Mac Mini, and with that firewire upgrade, you get 3 firewire outputs, to the mini's single. Also, isn't just the idea of being able to upgrade the system, including adding a dedicated graphics card or 8 GB ram, a bit leap up from the Mini?
post #24 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by zunx View Post

Apple, please make us a QUIET Mac miniTOWER with FireWire 800 and 7200 rpm disks inside.

Your ilk has been asking for this for over what, twenty years now? Haven't you gotten the message yet?
post #25 of 236
Why are people so thick headed and ignorant? Apple sells hardware. That's the ONLY reason OS X, iTunes and the iPhone SDK exist. Turn OS X loose on crap PC hardware, iTunes loose crap MP3 players, and the iPhone SDK loose on crap cell phones, and Apple ceases to exist the next day. It's that simple. Don't you people know your Apple history? Apple turned Mac OS loose on third party hardware and damn near went out business in the 90's. Is the concept just too complicated for small minds to grasp?
post #26 of 236
Apple sells complete products.

While many of us like to tinker, there are many people out there who do not. That is who Apple is appealing to and it is only a matter of time before corporate America decides on adopting a similar stance (if Macs are to make inroads there). In a sense, they do with their MS-only attitude when it comes to rolling out desktops and having back-end servers; soon they will want working solutions!

I can't see any end-user wanting to buy this thing to save a few bucks. And I can't see anyone who tinkers thinking this thing is a great deal.
post #27 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimDreamworx View Post


I can't see any end-user wanting to buy this thing to save a few bucks.

There are many many people who bought hacked iPhones to avoid getting locked into paying 2 years of AT&T rates. They face the same updating issues as Hackintosh folks will, but that doesn't stop what is estimated to be a few million folks from doing it.

Speaking of which, is there anything in the iPhone EULA that says you can't run the iPhone software on a non-AT&T phone for the first 2 years?
post #28 of 236
I bet PC manufactures are listening closely at this
post #29 of 236
We need Apple to listen closely, we've been begging for a mid-tower Mac for ages!
post #30 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clive At Five View Post

So can you ask SWIY how GarageBand and pro-app performance is on his/her hackintosh? I haven't - I mean, SWIM hasn't had an opportunity to get his/her PC prepped for his/her hackintosh implementation yet. (S)he'd really like to know.

-Clive

Never tried Garageband or most Pro Apps, but Aperture, iTunes, and iPhoto work fine. They have even been successful with getting the latest updates via Software Updater.

Dell Optiplex w/ 2.66Ghz Pentium with SSE2 (and maybe SSE3, but not sure), 1.5GB DDR RAM, 2x80GB and 1x160GB internal HDDs, DVD±R. Start up time is 25 seconds.

Handbrake is very, very slow, DVD Player and Front Row do not work but SWIM never concerned with a solution to that. Sharing libraries with iTunes had issues, too. I'm pretty sure most of these issues, if not all have been worked out by now since SWIMs copy of OSx86 is a couple years old.
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post #31 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by dr_lha View Post

Yes, but with the mini you are not just paying for a low end machine, you're paying for the form factor. How much would a PC with the same form factor and specs as a $599 Mac mini cost?

That would assume the end user actually cares about the form factor and isn't simply interested in a cheap Mac system. I doubt the majority of purchasers would really be upset if the Mini was in a Mini- or Midtower configuration (from the number of comments on Mac sites, there seems to be a large group that would be absolutely giddy about that prospect).

The only reason you're paying for the form factor with the Mac Mini is that Apple gives you no other choice if you want a (vaguely) budget priced Mac.

The fact that it can easily and cheaply be upgraded both at time of purchase and afterwards makes a non-Apple sanctioned OS X running computer highly attractive. Even if the actual package won't be as pretty to look as Apple's product.
post #32 of 236
All those hits must be from the non-existent mid-range tower market.

If they get over here to the UK and come with some sort of warranty, I am buying one. To hell with the EULA and to hell with Apple. I've been waiting for a machine like this the entire time I've used a Mac and they've seen the demand often enough to make one.

I don't care about updates. I hardly ever update my system anyway and I'm sure someone will figure out how to get updates working anyway.

If this machine runs Leopard unmodified, I don't see how Apple can even have any say in this. They are only selling a box that runs Apple's system.

All I wanted was a machine I could use at home with good graphics. A 2.2GHz Core 2 Duo with an 8600 and 7200 rpm drives is ideal.

I'm not tied down to a single glossy display and I can replace my optical drives and hard drives however I like. 20x burner vs 8x in the iMac. For the first time in years, I'm excited about a Mac and it's not sold by Apple and as I suspected, there are a lot of people who feel the same way.
post #33 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by Superbass View Post

The End-User license agreement is just that - an agreement with the "End User", not the manufacturer or necessarily the installer. The only person who can violate is whoever buys it. Apple would have to take the company to court to get lists of purchasers, and then sue the individual users, which would be difficult and time consuming.

Does anyone know of any instances of a company actually suing for breach of EULA? I know that all of the recent piracy lawsuits have involved copyright law exclusively and not breach of EULA...

Before you start offering legal opinions you should make sure that you know what you are talking about because everything that you said is 100% false.

Software may be covered by patents, trademarks, and copyrights and with all three, inducement or contributory infringement are actionable against suppliers. Additionally, manufacturers are subject to a separate license, rather than the EULA (which as the name states applies to end users) and may only install the licensed software in accordance with the terms of that license.

In practice, end users are never sued for IP violations because it is easier to sue the contributory infringer who would be liable for each violation by his or her customers.

Piracy lawsuits are a different matter because the person who induces the infringement is often overseas and beyond the reach of American courts. Therefore, it is easier to sue end users. However, end users have been sued for EULA violations, most recently by Microsoft (end users who violated OEM licensing of Windows and Office products by installing on another machine).
post #34 of 236
There will always be cheapos out there unwilling to pay even a nickel for something, yet they will spend all of their waking hours to get something for nothing. This thread is evidence of that.

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post #35 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by caliminius View Post

That would assume the end user actually cares about the form factor and isn't simply interested in a cheap Mac system. I doubt the majority of purchasers would really be upset if the Mini was in a Mini- or Midtower configuration (from the number of comments on Mac sites, there seems to be a large group that would be absolutely giddy about that prospect).

The only reason you're paying for the form factor with the Mac Mini is that Apple gives you no other choice if you want a (vaguely) budget priced Mac.

Agreed. I happen to have just finished helping a friend build a Hackintosh. Why? Because it was a fraction of the cost of a Mac Pro. The damage:

$100 Gigabyte P35-DS4 motherboard (open box) with 8 USB 2.0 and 2 Firewire ports
$60 aluminum case with 11 drive bays
$70 80-Plus rated 500w power supply
$65 4GB of DDR2 800 RAM
$40 GeForce 7600GT PCIe video card with both DVI and VGA outputs
$30 CPU cooler
$200 Core 2 Quad Q6600 2.4GHz CPU
$89 Leopard from Amazon
$25 Philips SATA 20x DVD burner
$115 Samsung 750GB 7200rpm 32MB cache hard drive

Total: just over $800 including shipping, and every spec is vastly superior to the Mac Mini, even the low-end video card. The only thing the Mini has that the Hackintosh doesn't is Bluetooth and Wifi, and we could add those for about $30 if he wanted it. The case isn't as elegant as the Mac Pro's, but you can't have everything. And if he decides to upgrade next year, it will again cost him less than selling a Mac Pro and buying a new one. I can't say I'm not sorely tempted to build one for myself.
post #36 of 236
dang.... i was about to buy my first Mac from there... for just $400 dollars. I'm sure if Apple released something similar to that it would be a hit. I'd buy it.
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post #37 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kolchak View Post

Agreed. I happen to have just finished helping a friend build a Hackintosh. Why? Because it was a fraction of the cost of a Mac Pro. The damage:

$100 Gigabyte P35-DS4 motherboard (open box) with 8 USB 2.0 and 2 Firewire ports
$60 aluminum case with 11 drive bays
$70 80-Plus rated 500w power supply
$65 4GB of DDR2 800 RAM
$40 GeForce 7600GT PCIe video card with both DVI and VGA outputs
$30 CPU cooler
$200 Core 2 Quad Q6600 2.4GHz CPU
$89 Leopard from Amazon
$25 Philips SATA 20x DVD burner
$115 Samsung 750GB 7200rpm 32MB cache hard drive

Total: just over $800 including shipping, and every spec is vastly superior to the Mac Mini, even the low-end video card. The only thing the Mini has that the Hackintosh doesn't is Bluetooth and Wifi, and we could add those for about $30 if he wanted it. The case isn't as elegant as the Mac Pro's, but you can't have everything. And if he decides to upgrade next year, it will again cost him less than selling a Mac Pro and buying a new one. I can't say I'm not sorely tempted to build one for myself.

1) Have you verified the HW will work (and are optimized) with the hacked copy of Leopard?
2) Once you have this store bought version of Leopard, how are you going to get it to install? The usual way is to just DL the pre-edited x86 install disc, from what I'm told.
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post #38 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by flydoggie View Post

Before you start offering legal opinions you should make sure that you know what you are talking about because everything that you said is 100% false.

... manufacturers are subject to a separate license, rather than the EULA (which as the name states applies to end users) and may only install the licensed software in accordance with the terms of that license.

Wow, so everything I wrote is 100% false, but then you repeated what I wrote about EULA's as though it's true. Hmm, did i forget that it's opposite day today?

Or are you, sir, a conundrum?
post #39 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

1) Have you verified the HW will work (and are optimized) with the hacked copy of Leopard?
2) Once you have this store bought version of Leopard, how are you going to get it to install? The usual way is to just DL the pre-edited x86 install disc, from what I'm told.

Most of the hardware doesn't care what OS is running. Only the motherboard and the video card may have problems. The P35 series from Gigabyte are known to be some of the most compatible with OS X (along with Intel's Bad Axe 2 and Asus' P5 series, but those use older chipsets and will not work with Yorkfield), with almost all features working out of the box and only a few patches required, if any. There are plenty of options for making Geforce cards work properly with OS X. The retail copy of Leopard was mainly to salve his conscience, not for installation.
post #40 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by suhail View Post

We need Apple to listen closely, we've been begging for a mid-tower Mac for ages!

Bingo. That would be the reason that this product would be successful; Apple does not sell the product that a large number of Mac users want to buy. If someone else comes along as does so, Apple's losses are entirely of their own doing.

I just bought a new iMac, but I'll give it to my son and buy an OpenMac in a heartbeat if it actually comes to fruition, for no other reason than it's the Mac I wanted to buy from Apple in the first place.
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