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Apple files first lawsuit in defense of "Made for iPod" licensing - Page 3

post #81 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfiler View Post

Ah... another perfect example of why I despise the current body of patent laws in the United States.

Companies should not be given monopolies over accessory markets simply because they make their plug a different shape.

To do so is actually at odds with the original intent of patents. Patents were legislated in order to further the public good, not because it was "fair" for inventors. The idea was to make it such that secrets were more likely to be divulged and thus benefit the public. Rewarding inventors is how patents accomplish that goal, not the goal itself.

In this specific instance, Apple is hiding behind patent law to prevent competition, not to protect a novel idea whose inception needs to be rewarded in order to motivate future innovation.

With that said, I think the issue here is that a company is claiming false membership in what amounts to certification program for accessories. In my opinion, that false claim is immoral and illegal, while the the use of the dock connector is not.

You're wrong in this.

The intent was to BOTH insure fair return for the inventor, AND insure widespread adoption for the public good.

It also gave others the opportunity (for those who could travel to Washington, a difficult, expensive, and perilous journey in those days) to look at the invention and its patents, in the hope of working out some other way of accomplishing the same thing, or accomplishing something even better.
post #82 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

You're wrong in this.

Nuh-huh!

Patent holders have gone to considerable effort to sway public perception about the origin and even morality of patents. The same is true for copyrights.

I'm of the opinion that Americans have done a 180 on the subject, having once been the biggest violator of what are now dubbed "intellectual property rights." We now can't even fathom the mindset that existed at the time that patents (or copyrights) were initially legislated.

I'll grant however that historians are divided on the subject.

One thing is for sure, the morality of intellectual property law will be one of the biggest cultural battles of the next century. Not only do nations differ in opinion, but that opinion also changes over time.
post #83 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfiler View Post

Nuh-huh!

Patent holders have gone to considerable effort to sway public perception about the origin and even morality of patents. The same is true for copyrights.

There's no reason for them to have to publicize something which is correct.

Quote:
I'm of the opinion that Americans have done a 180 on the subject, having once been the biggest violator of what are now dubbed "intellectual property rights." We now can't even fathom the mindset that existed at the time that patents (or copyrights) were initially legislated.

Have you any evidence to back this up?

Quote:
I'll grant however that historians are divided on the subject.

One thing is for sure, the morality of intellectual property law will be one of the biggest cultural battles of the next century. Not only do nations differ in opinion, but that opinion also changes over time.

I'll agree on that.
post #84 of 84
Apple certainly doesn't need to worry about Living Solutions stealing business from them! I just purchased a Living Solutions iPod speaker with dock so I'd have something small I could keep in my bathroom. It was listed as $39.99 on the store shelf but rang up at $21.49, and I was thrilled to get such a great deal. Well, the joke was on me, because the stinking thing doesn't work. It plays music, but it won't charge either of my iPods. My older iPod no longer holds a charge, so it NEEDS to be on a charger in order to be of any use. (It's a third-generation monochrome iPod, and I have an iPod touch now as well, so I just don't think it's worth spending $60 + shipping to send it to Apple to get a new battery.)

Maybe Apple is concerned with cheap products like this wrecking its image, but believe me, I'm not faulting Apple for this piece of crap not working properly!

I must be off now to find a forum to leave a proper review for this piece of junk before I return it!
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