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What are your top 10 films? - Page 4

post #121 of 155
Sorry, I don't have 10. Grouped by director.

Once
2046, Chungking Express, Days of Being Wild, In the Mood for Love
Rope, Rear Window
Blade Runner
The Double Life of Veronique, Trois Couleurs
Brother
The Apartment
Cold Fever
Blue Velvet
Brazil, Holy Grail
Contempt, Breathless, Bande a part
Hiroshima mon amour
Star Wars 4, 5 & 6
Delicatessen
The Princess Bride
Bagdad Cafe
La Haine
Beat Street
Wild Style
Stand by Me
Vengeance Is Mine
Last Tango in Paris
Talladega Nights
Batman, Beetlejuice
Barton Fink, Miller's Crossing, Hudsucker Proxy, Lebowski, O Brother, No Country For Old Men
Repulsion, The Tenant, The Pianist, Rosemary's Baby
Coffee and Cigarettes, Mystery Train
Shop Girl
Mad Max
Friday
City of Lost Children
Oldboy
Paris, je t'aime
Hardware
Communion
City of God
Alien(s)
All Miyazaki films
All Wes Anderson films
Pixar FTW
2001
Heavy Traffic, Fritz and Wizards
Wait Until Dark

Damn, that's too long. Anyway, does HBO count? I say yes, so Deadwood and Carnivale
post #122 of 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by giant View Post

Blue Velvet

You know, I can't really say that it's a "good" movie or even one that I liked, but man it's unforgettable. I can't get out of my head that scene with Al from Quantum Leap lip-syncing to Roy Orbison's "In Dreams." Incredible song and scene.
post #123 of 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwinter View Post

I'm not really sure what that means. I thought it was mostly that capitalism is competition is struggle and replaces and destroys familial and social relations; in the end stasis can only be reached if the competitor is destroyed.

I think my saracasm detector went off -- false alarm?

They present this picture of purified Evil -- evil come into it's own, brooking no rival. This Evil crossed Brolin's character's path -- by being seemingly ubiquitous -- and he was led into temptation by the money. He makes a mistake by trying to mitigate, or bargain with that evil (in going back with the water.) I think that is the point of the movie. The rest is his attempting to placate that evil his is contending with, but in the end, obviously loses that struggle -- the Evil is completely consistent, it has to rule, or a least rule those who dabble with it.

Jones' character seems capable enough in solving each individual crime, but Cattle gun guy and the entity/struggle he represents are in a much wider far-flung conflict -- so he his helpless to intervene, and in the end he loses his nerve. Maybe I need to watch that conversation between Jones and Corbin again. The conversation in the diner seemed to tie in with what Brolin was doing -- no matter what, he just couldn't let that money go, his greed and hubris not allowing him to understand what he was dealing with.

Hats off to the Cohen brothers, I thought they were going to Hollywood their way out in the end -- have the villain monologue for five minutes -- Jones would dole out some pithy wisdom, and then blow him through a plate-glass window, out a 150 story building, only to be impaled on a water wheel covered in rusty spikes, spilling flesh-eating eating beetles instead of water.

Have you seen Lives of Others?

In our desire to impose form on the world we have lost the capacity to see the form that is there;
and in that lies not liberation but alienation, the cutting off from things as they really are. --...

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In our desire to impose form on the world we have lost the capacity to see the form that is there;
and in that lies not liberation but alienation, the cutting off from things as they really are. --...

Reply
post #124 of 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwinter View Post

You know, I don't get what people see in that flick.

It's a bewildering film at first, and the end turns into some bizarre action pieces, but stylistically it borrowed heavily from Metropolis and Nosferatu (heavy German Expressionism and Gothic elements) and had a huge influence on a whole crop of science-fiction films that followed... notably, The Matrix (Blade and Alien also had big chunks of influence on The Matrix).

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post #125 of 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by giant View Post

Sorry, I don't have 10. Grouped by director.

.........

Damn, that's too long. Anyway, does HBO count? I say yes, so Deadwood and Carnivale

Good list. I tend to pick movies by director also, then by certain stars.

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post #126 of 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

It's a bewildering film at first, and the end turns into some bizarre action pieces, but stylistically it borrowed heavily from Metropolis and Nosferatu (heavy German Expressionism and Gothic elements) and had a huge influence on a whole crop of science-fiction films that followed... notably, The Matrix (Blade and Alien also had big chunks of influence on The Matrix).

Dark City definitely hits that sci-fi/noir/puzzle sweet spot. Video games like Max Payne and Bioshock are also in the same vein, stylistically.
post #127 of 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Good list. I tend to pick movies by director also, then by certain stars.

Yeah, I usually go through directors and, secondarily, sountrack/composer. I'm a big fan of Angelo Badalamenti, who has scored chunks of most of David Lynch's films (sometimes together with Lynch), and Zbigniew Preisner, who did most of the music for Kieslowski. Wong Kar-wai and Wes Anderson are two others who are really notable for having consistently awesome music in their films.

Actually, as much as I like the other two, most films by Wong Kar-wai and any films scored by Preisner are really in a league of their own when it comes to the music.
post #128 of 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmz View Post

I think my saracasm detector went off -- false alarm?

Sorry! I mixed up No Country and There Will Be Blood. They're so similar, you know!

Quote:
They present this picture of purified Evil -- evil come into it's own, brooking no rival. This Evil crossed Brolin's character's path -- by being seemingly ubiquitous -- and he was led into temptation by the money. He makes a mistake by trying to mitigate, or bargain with that evil (in going back with the water.) I think that is the point of the movie. The rest is his attempting to placate that evil his is contending with, but in the end, obviously loses that struggle -- the Evil is completely consistent, it has to rule, or a least rule those who dabble with it.

See, I read him as Fate, not evil. Hence, all the coin flipping and the unstoppableness and all that. The title is what's important. The first line of the Yeats poem is "THAT is no country for old men," suggesting that the speaker is already on his way, looking back in disgust as what his country has become. It's about the "surface" of the world changingalways already changingeven though the world is inhabited by the same forces and just plain opting out. Indeed, the speaker in the poem, like TLJ, desires complete self-abnegationhe wants to become the aeolian harp or windchime on which the songs about the past, present, and future are played. Hence, the voiceover is TLJ's voice

set upon a golden bough to sing
To lords and ladies of Byzantium
Of what is past, or passing, or to come.

My point is that I don't think this is Brolin's character's story. It's TLJ's character's story.

Quote:
Have you seen Lives of Others?

Half of it, and I thought what I saw was brilliant. I haven't been in a position to watch a subtitled flick in months, so I haven't gotten back to it. Have YOU seen King of Kong?
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post #129 of 155
"There Will Be No Blood In My Country, Old Man"

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post #130 of 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwinter View Post

Sorry! I mixed up No Country and There Will Be Blood. They're so similar, you know!



See, I read him as Fate, not evil. Hence, all the coin flipping and the unstoppableness and all that. The title is what's important. The first line of the Yeats poem is "THAT is no country for old men," suggesting that the speaker is already on his way, looking back in disgust as what his country has become. It's about the "surface" of the world changing—always already changing—even though the world is inhabited by the same forces and just plain opting out. Indeed, the speaker in the poem, like TLJ, desires complete self-abnegation—he wants to become the aeolian harp or windchime on which the songs about the past, present, and future are played. Hence, the voiceover is TLJ's voice

set upon a golden bough to sing
To lords and ladies of Byzantium
Of what is past, or passing, or to come.

My point is that I don't think this is Brolin's character's story. It's TLJ's character's story.



Half of it, and I thought what I saw was brilliant. I haven't been in a position to watch a subtitled flick in months, so I haven't gotten back to it. Have YOU seen King of Kong?

Haven't seen that -- I may make an attempt wrestle my wife for a spot in her Netflix queue.

Back on NCFOM, near the beginning, there's a weird passive-aggressive thing that went on in the store, that seemed to really pull into focus a go-along, get-along/make nice mentality. The shopkeeper was clearly creeped out with cattle gun guy, but couldn't confront him honestly/forthrightly -- a combination of cowardice and social conditioning; but then he didn't/couldn't apprehend what he was dealing with. That seemed like a dig on the South. Maybe it's just another take on TLJ's route.

Any idea if the book goes there?

In our desire to impose form on the world we have lost the capacity to see the form that is there;
and in that lies not liberation but alienation, the cutting off from things as they really are. --...

Reply

In our desire to impose form on the world we have lost the capacity to see the form that is there;
and in that lies not liberation but alienation, the cutting off from things as they really are. --...

Reply
post #131 of 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmz View Post

Haven't seen that -- I may make an attempt wrestle my wife for a spot in her Netflix queue.

You can watch it online on Netfrix.

Quote:
Back on NCFOM, near the beginning, there's a weird passive-aggressive thing that went on in the store, that seemed to really pull into focus a go-along, get-along/make nice mentality. The shopkeeper was clearly creeped out with cattle gun guy, but couldn't confront him honestly/forthrightly -- a combination of cowardice and social conditioning; but then he didn't/couldn't apprehend what he was dealing with. That seemed like a dig on the South. Maybe it's just another take on TLJ's route.

Any idea if the book goes there?

No idea. I have never read it.
Gangs are not seen as legitimate, because they don't have control over public schools.
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post #132 of 155
sin city is a very good stan lee graphic novel adaptation. that is one of my favorite movies as well.
post #133 of 155
I'm trying to list some I haven't seen here yet.

Giant
Dr Zhivago
Lawrence of Arabia
Ghandi
On the Waterfont
Raging Bull
Gone with the Wind
A Streetcar Named Desire
In the Heat of the Night
The Killing Fields
The Seventh Seal


No Woody Allen movies? No Spike Lee?
post #134 of 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by deftones007 View Post

sin city is a very good stan lee graphic novel adaptation. that is one of my favorite movies as well.

In my opinion, Sin City is the only successful comic book put to film so far.

My reasons are complicated. In the early period of comic books, the layout and style of sequential art was stiff and the storytelling was bland. Two of the early pioneers, Jack Kirby and Will Eisner were big movie fans and just like their medium, American film was stiff and bland. Then Orson Welles' "Citizen Kane" came out. When they saw this film and saw the leaps and bounds Welles had made with the medium, they both decided to strive and create comics that leapt from the page and expanded the viewer's horizon with light, perspective, angles and storytelling just as Welles did.

Come to today and here a comic book creator and a filmmaker set out to do the same, but from the opposite direction and with new technology. I think they pulled it off grandly.

I saw Iron Man yesterday. Though the critics were gushing and praising this movie, I thought it was mediocre as far as a comic book film. It reminded me of Robo-Cop. Though Robert Downey Jr. redeemed it.

Now Speed Racer, that was an amazing, faithful and revolutionary piece of film making. One that overstepped the boundaries again. But the critics and the general public snubbed it. Most kid's cartoon remakes to film are disasters (Scooby Doo, Garfield, Underdog...), but In my opinion the Wachowski brothers did a stellar job with Speed Racer.

Go figger...\
post #135 of 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by mydo View Post

I'm trying to list some I haven't seen here yet.

Giant
Dr Zhivago
Lawrence of Arabia
Ghandi
On the Waterfont
Raging Bull
Gone with the Wind
A Streetcar Named Desire
In the Heat of the Night
The Killing Fields
The Seventh Seal

Damn good list mydo.

Quote:
No Woody Allen movies? No Spike Lee?

Both great directors in their own right. Both in serious trouble right now creatively (Allen) and in keeping their damn mouth shut (Lee).

I don't believe you heard the latest on Spike Lee's racist bullshit rant on Clint Eastwood and Eastwood's reply...

Spike Lee gets in Clint Eastwood's line of fire

Quote:
Clint Eastwood has advised rival film director Spike Lee to "shut his face" after the African-American complained about the racial make-up of Eastwood's films.

In an interview with the Guardian published today, Eastwood rejected Lee's complaint that he had failed to include a single African-American soldier in his films Flags of Our Fathers and Letters from Iwo Jima, both about the 1945 battle for the Japanese island.

In typically outspoken language, Eastwood justified his choice of actors, saying that those black troops who did take part in the battle as part of a munitions company didn't raise the flag. The battle is known by the image of US marines raising the American flag on Mount Suribachi.

"The story is Flags of Our Fathers, the famous flag-raising picture, and they didn't do that. If I go ahead and put an African-American actor in there, people'd go: 'This guy's lost his mind.' I mean, it's not accurate." Referring to Lee, he added: "A guy like him should shut his face."
post #136 of 155
I heard a little bit about Lee but not the Eastwood stuff. Despite what he's up to now, Do the Right Thing was a good movie that I would hope would stand the test of time. Malcolm X seems to be forgotten.
post #137 of 155
Quote:
Eastwood's next project, The Human Factor, will be about Nelson Mandela's attempts to foster national unity in post-apartheid South Africa. Asked if he would remain historically accurate with depictions of the former president, he said: "I'm not going to make Nelson Mandela a white guy."




That should be an interesting film, I hope.
post #138 of 155
Once Upon a Time in America.

The million hour cut.

The score so far is gorgeous.
post #139 of 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by mydo View Post

No Woody Allen movies? No Spike Lee?

One of my all-time favorites: What's Up, Tiger Lily?

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post #140 of 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by @_@ Artman View Post

I don't believe you heard the latest on Spike Lee's racist bullshit rant on Clint Eastwood and Eastwood's reply...

IMO, Spike Lee has personal issues. He's carelessly used charges of 'racism' his whole career. I used to think he was a social critic with merit, now I know he's just a jerk with a grudge.

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post #141 of 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingOfSomewhereHot View Post

I'd definitely include "Airplane" and "The Blues Brothers"

The Blues Brothers was great fun: rawhide!

Quote:
Originally Posted by hardeeharhar View Post

-The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension

Classic! Haven't thought of that one in years!

Quote:
Originally Posted by @_@ Artman View Post

In my opinion, Sin City is the only successful comic book put to film so far.

How about 300 -- I preferred that one to Sin City (though Sin City was good).

Quote:
Originally Posted by deftones007 View Post

Hard Candy (Please, do yourself a favor and watch one of the most brilliantly written movies. If you like a psychological movie then this is it!!!)

Quite good. Disturbing, but Ellen Page was amazing.

----------

My list:

1. Kill Bill (it's the soundtrack as much as anything else)
2. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (was a well-timed movie -- I saw it not long after the end of my first serious relationship)
3. It's a Wonderful Life (saw this for the first time just five years ago -- simply excellent)
4. American Beauty (the first movie that I really loved -- I've seen it more than any other, though Kill Bill is catching up quickly)
5. 2001: a Space Odyssey (best science fiction film ever)
6. The Matrix (what can I say?)
7. Fight Club ("Now, a question of etiquette - as I pass, do I give you the ass or the crotch?")
8. 300 (I can almost smell the ink rising off the page as I watch this one)
9. The Usual Suspects (so much fun -- If KS could have actually shed a tear in his mock-sob, I might move this up a couple spots)
10. Moulin Rouge (while I like The Sound of Music and White Christmas, this is the best film where people break out in song)
post #142 of 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denton View Post

How about 300 -- I preferred that one to Sin City (though Sin City was good).

Well, the director of 300 was in constant contact with Frank Miller during the shoot. Also, this was color and color that successfully matched colorist Lin Varley's palette from the graphic novel. I liked it too.

It all depends on the director's intentions. I understand most super-hero movies can be sequalized, but 300 is a stand alone story.

Also Frank Miller can be an egotistical ass. He and Rodriguez had a falling out on the Sin City sequel and now Miller is currently at work raping Will Eisner's The Spirit as we speak. It's sad that some geniuses have these lapses of stupidity (see Robo Cop II and The Dark Knight Returns)...but when they succeed (Sin City), it's brilliant.

Frank Miller's The Spirit trailer...
post #143 of 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by @_@ Artman View Post

Well, the director of 300 was in constant contact with Frank Miller during the shoot. Also, this was color and color that successfully matched colorist Lin Varley's palette from the graphic novel. I liked it too.

It all depends on the director's intentions. I understand most super-hero movies can be sequalized, but 300 is a stand alone story.

Also Frank Miller can be an egotistical ass. He and Rodriguez had a falling out on the Sin City sequel and now Miller is currently at work raping Will Eisner's The Spirit as we speak. It's sad that some geniuses have these lapses of stupidity (see Robo Cop II and The Dark Knight Returns)...but when they succeed (Sin City), it's brilliant.

Frank Miller's The Spirit trailer...

Oh, really. Wow. I hadn't heard of the falling out between him and Rodriguez. Doesn't completely surprise me. Miller is quite an alcoholic. I met him at a comic book signing once (him and Geoff Darrow) and he reeked of alcohol.

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post #144 of 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Oh, really. Wow. I hadn't heard of the falling out between him and Rodriguez. Doesn't completely surprise me. Miller is quite an alcoholic. I met him at a comic book signing once (him and Geoff Darrow) and he reeked of alcohol.

I may be wrong (I was told by a friend of mine) here's what Wikipedia says about the delays on Sin City 2...

Quote:
Sin City 2 is the currently unproduced sequel to Sin City. Although specific plot details remain unknown, it is generally believed the film will be based on Miller's A Dame to Kill For, certain stories from "Booze, Broads and Bullets" and an original story involving Nancy Callahan.[13]

Production on the film has been delayed, most notably due to Robert Rodriguez's involvement with a scheduled remake of Barbarella.[14] There is also speculation that the box office failure of Grindhouse has caused the film to be delayed.

Funny, I thought Rodriguez's movie from the Grindhouse was very good in it's own demented way.

Also, he's remaking Barbarella......I just watched the original last night.
post #145 of 155
A Barbarella remake?

Sigh, Hollywood really is out of original ideas. \
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post #146 of 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by iPoster View Post

A Barbarella remake?

Sigh, Hollywood really is out of original ideas. \

If you can find it, rent CQ about a young filmmaker who goes to Paris in the sixties to shoot a science fiction film.

Roman Coppola directed it. I like it when someone pays homage to something by creating something new and unique to frame it with. That's originality.


CQ trailer
post #147 of 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by @_@ Artman View Post

I like it when someone pays homage to something by creating something new and unique to frame it with. That's originality.[/URL]

IF the remake/repackaging/tribute is as good or better, yes.

Too often, particularly with Hollywood, the remake is much worse than the original.

Off the top of my head, I give you:

King Kong
Planet of the Apes
The Poseidon Adventure
Bad News Bears
The Ring
Amityville Horror
Herbie
War of the Worlds (OK, this one isn't terrible, but IMHO it's one of Spielberg's weakest films)
The Rear Window remake (can't recall the name right now)

Although, there are only 7 original plots after all, so I guess we can't complain too much! \
You need skeptics, especially when the science gets very big and monolithic. -James Lovelock
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post #148 of 155
On a side note I'm taking a break from movies about Africa. Hotel Rwanda, Last King of Scotland, Blood Diamonds, The Constant Gardner. Does anything good happen there?
post #149 of 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by iPoster View Post

IF the remake/repackaging/tribute is as good or better, yes.

Too often, particularly with Hollywood, the remake is much worse than the original.

Off the top of my head, I give you:

King Kong (Though toooooo long, I like it. Can't beat the original uncut version though)
Planet of the Apes (I see this DVD in the budget bins and want to get it. I liked the visuals)
The Poseidon Adventure (Well, I didn't like the first one either, hate Irwin Allen)
Bad News Bears (Never saw the remake, it doesn't deserve it)
The Ring (I could on in length with the utter stupidity of remaking Asian films, the pros and cons...but we will have to see how Steven Spielberg does with Ghost in the Shell...)
Amityville Horror (Again...why?)
Herbie (ditto)
War of the Worlds (OK, this one isn't terrible, but IMHO it's one of Spielberg's weakest films) (Spielberg is a great director...also an idiot sometimes...see above on Asian remakes)
The Rear Window remake (can't recall the name right now) (Someone did a remake of that? Didn't they learn their lesson with Psycho? I guess not...)

Although, there are only 7 original plots after all, so I guess we can't complain too much! \

The writer's strike hasn't helped. This will be a running thing until the writers get back in synch...but will they?
post #150 of 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by mydo View Post

On a side note I'm taking a break from movies about Africa. Hotel Rwanda, Last King of Scotland, Blood Diamonds, The Constant Gardner. Does anything good happen there?

No. Not since the end of the cold war.
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post #151 of 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwinter View Post

No. Not since the end of the cold war.

I think you mean since the end of European colonization? They did draw up the present borders with no regard to previous tribal/national boundaries.
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post #152 of 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by iPoster View Post

I think you mean since the end of European colonization? They did draw up the present borders with no regard to previous tribal/national boundaries.

Yes, but that meant that Europe was paying attention to Africa. During the Cold War, the world paid lots of attention to Africa. Now, no one pays attention to Africa, which is the heart of the tragedy of big chunks of the continent. Somalia doesn't have a functioning government? No one cares. Nearly a million Rwandans hacked to death wit machetes? No one cares. Darfur? AIDS in Kenya? Roving gangs in South Africa? Mugabe forcing his challenger to withdraw from the election?

Europe royally screwed up Africa, yes. But the indifference is worse.
Gangs are not seen as legitimate, because they don't have control over public schools.
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post #153 of 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwinter View Post


Europe royally screwed up Africa, yes. But the indifference is worse.

Can't argue with that.
You need skeptics, especially when the science gets very big and monolithic. -James Lovelock
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post #154 of 155
The Time Machine
The Aviator
Tombstone
The Blues Brothers
Blues Brothers 2000
Apocalypse Now
Full Metal Jacket
Contact
It's a Wonderful Life
post #155 of 155
Its a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad, World
.
Cuckoo's Nest
Godfather
Matrix
Die Hard (1)
Terminator 2
Titanic
Shawshank Redemption
Saving Private Ryan
Jaws
Heat.

yeah, kinda weighted to recent flicks...
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