or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Complexity of Apple retail stores revealed by permits
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Complexity of Apple retail stores revealed by permits

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
(ifoAppleStore) The complexity of an Apple store is visible to visitors, but beneath the structure of stainless steel, glass and stone is another level of complexity that is just as important. City permit records show that the electrical, plumbing and other systems inside the retail outlets are extensive -- and expensive.

For instance, the new Boylston Street (Boston) store has 550 lighting fixtures, 224 electrical receptacles and 25 switched outlets, consuming a maximum of 1,200 amps, according to the permits. That’s enough current to power 12 average-sized homes.

The store also has 17 motors for various air conditioning and elevator operations, and a 200 KVA gas-fired generator to supply electricity if the utility power fails. Meanwhile, the fire alarm system consists of 97 different detection and initiating devices, and has 37 alarms to alert the public.

Additionally, city permits show the store to have 51 security devices, 94 data outlets and 90 "telecommunications" devices. In total, Boylston Street store's electrical installation is valued at $971,000, according to an application filed Apple to allow contractors to perform the electrical work.

The store’s plumbing is equally complex: three water closets, one kitchen sink and four lavatories in the basement, along with one hot water heater, slop sink, one urinal and one drinking fountain. Two boilers in the basement connect to the HVAC system, supplying a maximum of 1*million BTUs, a measure of the system’s capacity to heat or cool.

The store’s video surveillance system uses 36 cameras, according to the documents, which safeguard both the store’s public and non-public areas.

Even the work permits themselves came with a high pricetag: $11,590 for the permit covering the installation of temporary electrical service during construction, and $80,900 for the permanent electrical work permit. The closed-circuit TV permit was $20,700, the plumbing permit $17,000, and the gas fitting permit $12,000.

Apple's latest flagship shop on Boylston Street in Boston, Mass.

Overall, some estimates put the total cost of the Boylston Street store at nearly $6 million, including $236,000 to demolish the original building on the site.

Gary Allen is the creator and author of ifo Apple Store, which provides close watch of Apple's retail initiative. When Gary isn't busy publishing news and information on Apple's latest retail stores, he finds himself hanging out at one.
post #2 of 28
Hot Water Heater hmmmm
post #3 of 28
the apple logo appears to be leaning to the left in that photo.
post #4 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlrcasanova View Post

Hot Water Heater hmmmm


iWater, iHot, iLeak
I APPLE THEREFORE I AM
Reply
I APPLE THEREFORE I AM
Reply
post #5 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlrcasanova View Post

Hot Water Heater hmmmm

Jobs is gonna intro the iWuvHotWater at WWDC!

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #6 of 28
This just shows once again how out of control the govt has gotten when you look at the cost of just the permits for this store. Completely unjustified.
post #7 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sawdustman View Post

This just shows once again how out of control the govt has gotten when you look at the cost of just the permits for this store. Completely unjustified.

Those fees are typical and ensure the building is inspected and built to code. The reason for building codes and permits is to avoid what we just saw in China. School buildings built on the cheap which collapsed during the earth quake even though they were supposed to be designed and build to withstand them. Had they been inspected and built correctly there would be fewer grieving parents in CHina.
post #8 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by der passant View Post

Those fees are typical and ensure the building is inspected and built to code. The reason for building codes and permits is to avoid what we just saw in China. School buildings built on the cheap which collapsed during the earth quake even though they were supposed to be designed and build to withstand them. Had they been inspected and built correctly there would be fewer grieving parents in CHina.


An all glass facade is just perfect in a 7.8 mag earthquake. Couldn't be in a safer spot then Apple Store Boyleston during that kinda quake!
post #9 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by der passant View Post

Those fees are typical and ensure the building is inspected and built to code. The reason for building codes and permits is to avoid what we just saw in China. School buildings built on the cheap which collapsed during the earth quake even though they were supposed to be designed and build to withstand them. Had they been inspected and built correctly there would be fewer grieving parents in CHina.

Note that the permit are not related to the structural system. The permit covers the electrical and mechanical work which is not related to the building ability to withstand earthquakes and/or wind forces.

However, the fees are justified. The fees are mainly related to public health and safety. The city have to make sure that the build can get the required power, water supply, and sewer drainage. The city also have to make sure that all fire safety equipments are correct and as per design standards and drawings. This is not an easy job and I know that because I am a structural engineer and work on construction projects for a living.
post #10 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by freethinker View Post

An all glass facade is just perfect in a 7.8 mag earthquake. Couldn't be in a safer spot then Apple Store Boyleston during that kinda quake!

Glass can be engineering to withstand large lateral movement such as the movement experienced during an earthquake.
post #11 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by NasserAE View Post

However, the fees are justified. The fees are mainly related to public health and safety. The city have to make sure that the build can get the required power, water supply, and sewer drainage. The city also have to make sure that all fire safety equipments are correct and as per design standards and drawings. This is not an easy job and I know that because I am a structural engineer and work on construction projects for a living.

Yeah and that is just the above board fees. Can you imagine how much it actually costs to get everything signed off on? There's the greens fees, the dinners and the bottles of liquor. Heck you even have to pay people to make sure you don't get a $500 parking ticket. You cant park a construction truck on the street downtown, what are you crazy?

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #12 of 28
umm... how is this newsworthy?

is it out of line with nearby retailers?

is it an unusual level of power consumption?

or is it just typical building codes for a retail outlet of that size?

I have no idea, anyone have more of a clue?
post #13 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by McHuman View Post

the apple logo appears to be leaning to the left in that photo.

You can thank Steve and his buddy Al Gore for Apple's left-leaning.
post #14 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by iCarbon View Post

umm... how is this newsworthy?

is it out of line with nearby retailers?

is it an unusual level of power consumption?

or is it just typical building codes for a retail outlet of that size?

I have no idea, anyone have more of a clue?

Yeah, I'm with you on this one. While I am certain that this is beyond the average for retail buildings of the same size, you wouldnt expect department stores to have the same power and cooling requirements...

I guess the point is, assuming that this store is outfitted above the average even for giant electronics stores, that Apple/Jobs are leaving nothing to chance--going for the top dollar experrience and assuring that whatever they want to do in the fuure, they have the capacity for it. This makes sense as it is the image they have been cultivating for some time now...
Progress is a comfortable disease
--e.e.c.
Reply
Progress is a comfortable disease
--e.e.c.
Reply
post #15 of 28
What's the difference between a water closet and a lavatory?
Also, I don't find its power consumption (eq. 14 homes) all that unusual.
post #16 of 28
Solar Panels.
It is green, will help keep Apple costs down in the future and is good PR.
post #17 of 28
As with any religious organizations, such a beautiful structure is inspired from above and a necessity for followers to worship.
Cubist
Reply
Cubist
Reply
post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by city View Post

As with any religious organizations, such a beautiful structure is inspired from above and a necessity for followers to worship.


Ok, that is what I wanted to say! Damn.
Progress is a comfortable disease
--e.e.c.
Reply
Progress is a comfortable disease
--e.e.c.
Reply
post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by der passant View Post

Those fees are typical and ensure the building is inspected and built to code. The reason for building codes and permits is to avoid what we just saw in China. School buildings built on the cheap which collapsed during the earth quake even though they were supposed to be designed and build to withstand them. Had they been inspected and built correctly there would be fewer grieving parents in CHina.

The buildings in China were built by the government. Why do you think they are not allowing aid to the hardest hit areas? They do not want the outside world to see just how bad things are there. \
Just say no to MacMall.  They don't honor their promotions and won't respond to customer inquiries.  There are better retailers out there.
Reply
Just say no to MacMall.  They don't honor their promotions and won't respond to customer inquiries.  There are better retailers out there.
Reply
post #20 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buck View Post

What's the difference between a water closet and a lavatory?
Also, I don't find its power consumption (eq. 14 homes) all that unusual.

The Lavatory is the sink and the water closet is the toilet.

As an Architect, I'll point out that ALL plumbing, electrical and HVAC require extensive permits and likely is no Less complicated than what they are reading about here.
post #21 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by roehlstation View Post

The Lavatory is the sink and the water closet is the toilet.

As an Architect, I'll point out that ALL plumbing, electrical and HVAC require extensive permits and likely is no Less complicated than what they are reading about here.

That's just bizarre. In most English speaking countries the Lavatory is the toilet. I just can't imagine washing my face in the lavatory. Each to their own though.
post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

(ifoAppleStore) The closed-circuit TV permit was $20,700...

Puhlease, that is the biggest BS permit fee I have seen...
Hard-Core.
Reply
Hard-Core.
Reply
post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Grain of Salt View Post

That's just bizarre. In most English speaking countries the Lavatory is the toilet. I just can't imagine washing my face in the lavatory. Each to their own though.

Dictionary definition has lavatory defined either way, in drawings and specifications Architects and contractors refer to the lavatory as the sink and the water closet as the toilet, or we just all it the toilet.


Also,

"Puhlease, that is the biggest BS permit fee I have seen..." referring to the 20k + for closed circuit is NOT the permit fee, it is the estimated cost of the CCTV system itself.

This is really a story that isn't telling much. It is not surprising at all the cost of any of this equipment. You should see what it costs just to put a 2 toilet bathroom facility in the park is. Construction cost of structure is about $15,000 the plumbing is $125,000 Especially if they have to run a long stretch of pipe for water and sewer. You should see those costs in any public works project. Apple is not spending more than any other retail outlet out there on this construction, the only thing they are spending more on is structural since they are doing more elaborate structural design.
post #24 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Grain of Salt View Post

That's just bizarre. In most English speaking countries the Lavatory is the toilet. I just can't imagine washing my face in the lavatory. Each to their own though.

A public restroom is also called a lavatory. "Lava" means wash.
Cubist
Reply
Cubist
Reply
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by razorpit View Post

The buildings in China were built by the government. Why do you think they are not allowing aid to the hardest hit areas? They do not want the outside world to see just how bad things are there. \

No... that's Myanmar.

Quote:
Originally Posted by razorpit View Post

They do not want the outside world to see just how bad things are there. \

The opposite has been true. This is a great PR/propaganda opportunity for the Chiense government pre-Olympics.
post #26 of 28
Wow, an Apple store is amazingly complex!

Like a 7-Eleven. Or a gas station.
post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by paloozamalooza View Post

No... that's Myanmar.



The opposite has been true. This is a great PR/propaganda opportunity for the Chiense government pre-Olympics.



Can I have some of what you're smoking?
Just say no to MacMall.  They don't honor their promotions and won't respond to customer inquiries.  There are better retailers out there.
Reply
Just say no to MacMall.  They don't honor their promotions and won't respond to customer inquiries.  There are better retailers out there.
Reply
post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by freethinker View Post

An all glass facade is just perfect in a 7.8 mag earthquake. Couldn't be in a safer spot then Apple Store Boyleston during that kinda quake!

Quote:
Originally Posted by NasserAE View Post

Glass can be engineering to withstand large lateral movement such as the movement experienced during an earthquake.

True, here's an example from over in Japan, where they know a few things about building for earthquakes:

Quote:
The Kobe earthquake in 1995 put the Kansai international airport to test. It's epicenter was only 20km away from KIX. It killed 6,434 people in Honshu. But airport received almost no damage whatsoever. Even the glass in the windows remained intact. Later, the airport survived typhoon with a wind speeds up to 200km/h.

Here's a photo, it has quite a bit of glass in the terminal:



IRT Topic:
I don't understand the point of the article either, I'm sure the store is no more complex than a comparable tech store.
You need skeptics, especially when the science gets very big and monolithic. -James Lovelock
The Story of Stuff
Reply
You need skeptics, especially when the science gets very big and monolithic. -James Lovelock
The Story of Stuff
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Complexity of Apple retail stores revealed by permits